Alfa Romeo Forums banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just purchased a '73 Spider with the original SPICA fuel system. After the first few days of driving it started leaking fuel at the main filter o ring. I didn't see how the seal was installed when I removed it. I bought a new filter and seal but now I'm not sure where the seal goes. I can't get it to stay in what appears to be an o ring grove on the underside of the top half that has the fuel fittings (per this sites recommendation, I removed the whole assembly - great tip). The seal will fit around the top portion of the fuel canister.

Can someone please advise if the o ring has to be forced into the grove on the side under the fuel fittings or does it go around the top of the fuel canister?

Also, do I need to fill the canister with fuel before reinstalling it to make sure the pump doesn't run dry when I start it back up?

Thanks for helping a new guy. I've spent hours searching for an answer and found a thread from June/July 2005 with the same question but it wasn't answered. I've attempted to add a photograph from that thread (Rassilon, 7-22-05, #12 permalink in the injection section - the picture is at link:http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/carburetors-fuel-injection/12906-fuel-leak.html)

This site has been a great help in learning about this interesting automobile.

Thanks for helping a rookie.


FuelFilterParts2.JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,975 Posts
I've always managed to get the rubber ring into the groove. The lip of the canister then fits up and seals against it.

As for filling the canister with fuel, I wouldn't bother. When you turn the key to "on" the fuel pump will start circulating fuel through the supply and return lines. Let it run for a little bit before you start the car and you'll be sure the canister is full.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,977 Posts
I've never had a problem with that. Are you sure you can't get just one small part in the groove, then work your way around?

Like Bob said, the fuel pump will fill the filter up. When you see the fuel low pressure light go out, you'll know it's full and the entire system pressurized.

Also, you might get some seepage from the center bolt. Before you reinstall, take the soft copper washer and run it in circles on some very fine sandpaper to take out the scratches. Don't be afraid to get the bolt good and tight. It's easiest to do this with the filter mounted on the sidewall of the engine compartment. You might even have to tighten/loosen/tighten to get the copper washer to seal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,166 Posts
I like to error on the "not tight enough" side on a bolt like that. If there is a slight weepage, just a :rolleyes:smidgeon more. No need to go crazy with a breaker bar and a pipe on a bolt like that.;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Thanks for your quick feedback, Bob, John and lowmileage. I could start the o ring in the groove for about the first 30/360 degrees; after that I had to slightly stretch it because the diameter was too large to fit. By the time I got to the 300/360 degree point I had an extra 1/4" to 3/8" of o ring that had no where to go due to it being stretched enough to fit. I'm hoping the seal was just the wrong diameter but the (new looking) fuel filter was installed by an experienced Alfa technician per the previous owner. The cars records verified that both fuel filters were changed and the tank inspected in the last 500 miles. I will scuff the copper washer. 1500 grit OK?

Thanks again for everyone's help. Much appreciated. I'll keep you posted.

Gregg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,608 Posts
By the time I got to the 300/360 degree point I had an extra 1/4" to 3/8" of o ring that had no where to go due to it being stretched enough to fit.
I had the same experience with the O-ring on my filter canister. Almost no matter what I did there was a bulge sticking out of the groove. In the end I managed to get the entire O-ring to fit in there, and it hasn't leaked since (apart from through the washer now and then :mad: )
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks, TorW. I'll keep tweaking it until I get the o ring fully seated.

Best Regards,
Gregg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Follow-up and Thanks

John, thanks for the advice. I found a nick in the o ring that was leaking so I didn't want to reinstall it. I may have damaged it in my bungling to try and get it in while the housing was still on the car. I ended up ordering a new filter; it came with a square gasket that dropped right in. I installed new fuel hoses and clamps while I had the filter housing out. Put it back together last night and it is leak free. The old Spyder is back on the road.

Thanks to everyone for all your help!!

John, you are a wealth of information. I've been reading your posts for the last week - tremendous help to a rookie owner. Thanks for taking the time to share your knowledge at this site. Great stuff!!

Best Regards,
Gregg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
similar issue- main fuel filter

I have a simple, but perplexing problem: my 1978 Spider has a main fuel filter that won't release from the casting that is bolted to the inner fender. After removing the central bolt, the bottom cast 'dome', or cover drops away-- leaving what looks like a filter element, that just won't release. It is clean, and rock solid... what am I missing here? The return fuel line is blocked off,
( not there) would this be right for a '78?
Also, I'd like to publicly thank John Stewart for all his expert help previously. I am recovering from a bad case of poison ivy (think 2nd degree burns) on my arms, and am just now getting back to troubleshooting.
I must pull the rear filter, probably clogged, which I think is making the car sputter and die.
Any advice is much appreciated. james.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,977 Posts
I think I need to see pictures of what you're talking about, both of the fuel filter and the return line routing. The fuel return line (that's the one from the front fitting of the injection pump back to the tank) should NEVER EVER EVER be blocked off. That effectively "deadheads" the fuel supply pump . . . . BTW, one that can produce VERY high pressure when deadheaded, and perhaps exceed the bursting capacity of the rubber fuel lines. If you want excitement, try spraying high pressure fuel all over a hot engine and see what happens. What can also happen when deadheading a continuously running fuel supply pump, is that it heats up the fuel in the pump and cavitates, then loses pressure.

It sounds as if the previous owner tried to "fix" a weak supply pump by blocking off the return completely, thereby boosting the pressure. BAD BAD BAD. NEVER DO THIS.

The page below is from the 79 owner's manual on changing the filter. I think the 78 is the same.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Hi John, I see you are attending to my problems once again... you may recall I spent 2 weeks dicovering that my bell crank and rod were incorrect, another week to order the part... I would not know the lines are a hazard unless a pro took the trouble to tell me.
I'll get a photo up shortly. My L.P. fuel light worked before, now it does not. (?)
The main filter is as shown in the diagram. Remove the center bolt- it stays put & I mean like it is one piece. I thought maybe it unscrews, wiggles off, has some other fastening screw or bolt... an item like that ought to just release with the bolt withdrawn. And no fuel leak once the bottom 'dome' and rubber o-ring are back on. JC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
main fuel filter

Hi John, I see you are attending to my problems once again... you may recall I spent 2 weeks dicovering that my bell crank and rod were incorrect, another week to order the part... I would not know the lines are a hazard unless a pro took the trouble to tell me.
I'll get a photo up shortly. My L.P. fuel light worked before, now it does not. (?)
The main filter is as shown in the diagram. Remove the center bolt- it stays put & I mean like it is one piece. I thought maybe it unscrews, wiggles off, has some other fastening screw or bolt... an item like that ought to just release with the bolt withdrawn. And no fuel leak once the bottom 'dome' and rubber o-ring are back on. JC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
John S. , here is photo of fuel routing/ filter assy.

John,. here is the fuel filter assembly. Not much to show on the filter can itself, just held fast, with no sign of corrosion of any kind, not even dirty. Won't let go. J
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Mine looks exactly the same with the two ports blocked off. 79 spider SPICA. I am facing a low power issue and never even noticed this until I went to try to replace the fuel filters. The filter was perfectly clean (which is not surprising as the engine was rebuilt 1500 miles before my purchase 2 months ago). What's the fix?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,977 Posts
On the fuel low pressure light. Ground the wire going to the low pressure sending unit. If the light on the dash comes on, that part's good.


With the wire hooked up to the sending unit, if the light stays on with the fuel pump running, it's either a bad sending unit, or the pump output is low, or somebody removed the restrictor from the outlet fitting on the injection pump. Try squeezing the outlet hose from the injector pump and see if the light goes out.

On the front filter itself, the bolt must be seized. The only thing I could recommend is to just get a good 3/4" socket and a breaker bar and force it loose. If you break the bolt or filter then get a new one off eBay or from Alfa Parts Exchange. Could be that front filter hasn't been changed in a very very long time.

In dealing with low pressure issues get the guide from Ingram Enterprises, Inc. || Spica Pump Rebuilds
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,243 Posts
Does anyone have a part number for a Baldwin main fuel filter for early Spica cars from '69 to '74? Or any other part number for other filter brands?

Thanks
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top