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1974 Alfa Romeo spider
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking for all of the people who were fooling around with the Spica injected cars when they were new. I have read various blogs about replacing the original fuel pump on these cars, some say put a Bosch ....070 pump on and close up the return line others say, "that will make the injection pump overheat" and to put a Bosch ...044 pump on with a regulator and replumb the return line. Back in the '70s someone came up with a way to use a Holley high performance fuel pump that came with a regulator but just the pump was used. No other modifications. There was an article in "AlfaOwner". Does anyone remember this and what fuel pump it was?
 

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Registered
1974 Alfa Romeo spider
Joined
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143 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Looking for all of the people who were fooling around with the Spica injected cars when they were new. I have read various blogs about replacing the original fuel pump on these cars, some say put a Bosch ....070 pump on and close up the return line others say, "that will make the injection pump overheat" and to put a Bosch ...044 pump on with a regulator and replumb the return line. Back in the '70s someone came up with a way to use a Holley high performance fuel pump that came with a regulator but just the pump was used. No other modifications. There was an article in "AlfaOwner". Does anyone remember this and what fuel pump it was?
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I worked at a dealer in 73-74, and in an imported car parts store and larger company for about 15 years after that.

At the time these cars were new, we could still get the three-port pump from Alfa, although I don't recall ever needing one through the mid-70s. By the late 70s the three port pumps were starting to fail, and we couldn't get new ones from Alfa. So, people starting playing around with whatever could be had.

From 75 onward I worked for BAP/Geon, and we were a national distributor for Bosch, but during that time it was impossible to get any technical info from Bosch. Their opinion was that we should just buy the original part number (which wasn't Bosch) and stop trying to re-engineer things. So, people being people, experimentation ensued.

For a while, the L-Jet pumps (and there were several similar-looking two-port units) were tried. They worked, but warm-temp low-pressure lights appeared. Someone (don't know who) soldered up the return orifice and got the light to go out. Others simply shut off the return line altogether. I have no doubt other experiments were tried, this being America and all.

I can't report on the Holley pump experiments. Never around them.

When I faced this problem with my Montreal, I discarded the idea of reducing the flow through the Spica pump, figuring it was worth a lot of money to protect that interesting piece of hardware. So, I ended up with two L-jet pumps and an adjustable regulator. The Montreal originally used two of the three-port pumps, to provide sufficient flow for the V8 engine. I was able to adjust two L-jets via the regulator to achieve the targeted pressure without reducing the size of the orifice.

I recently did the same thing with my 77 Spider, but using only one pump instead of two. I used an 044 to avoid borderline flow vs pressure conditions. working great.

FWIW, my Montreal had arrived FROM BOBCOR to the owner before me with the return line entirely blocked off. Thus, the Spica might have been receiving sufficient pressure, but had zero flow-through for cooling and lubrication. Bob Fernald in Austin, TX sorted out that problem, although I redid the plumbing when I did the dual-044 installation.

In the early days of Spica us 'Mericans really had no clue what was going on. "Feed it gas, and light the fire" might sum up our technology in the early 70s.
 
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