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'cept there is a vacuum line running from the engine manifold to the gas tank.
This is where the vacuum valve is.
In the picture below, the valve is in the upper right corner. The line it tees into runs from the vapor can (black plastic) to the engine intake manifold. Then the can connects both to the tank filler neck and to the tank itself (two lines at the base of the can).
Thanks for the basic fluid mechanics lecture BTW. We kinda glossed over that at RPI :p
VaporCan.jpg
 

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AlfaRich said:
I have come to the conlcusion that before any SPICA tune up, the fuel cap should be removed. When removing it, listen for inrushing air. Inrushing air does not smell like gas. Out rushing air will smell like gas if the tank is under pressure. Inrushing air means the vacuum valve is stuck closed. ANy attempts to tune a SPICA with negative pressure in the tank I believe will negatively affect the quality of your tune up job.
ANyone interested in purchasing a SPICA Cut off solenoid lock nut SPANNER tool should let me know. I have plans to build a few. Using a screwdriver to loosen and tighten this nut is like using Gas Pliers to adjust the stem on your grandfather's gold pocket watch. Eventually you will chew up the threads and most certainly have already ruined the nut itself....all while marginally tightening the nut.
So I hope to make one for myself and some extras for anyone interested in getting one.
I'd be interested in one of those tools, I used to have the Shankle tool, but it has disappeared.
This is a great thread. AR74's original problem has never been solved? If everything else is set correctly I would first look at the fuel filters. After the battery is diconnected and saftey precautions are observed, you can remove the front filter, inspect and replace as needed. In my experience the rear (tank) filter loads up and is often the cause of problems, not limited to: it will run but sometimes lacking top end performance, or it will run fine but if a long drive it will die and then restart after waiting a few minutes. You can clamp off the rear lines and remove the filter, keeping it horizontal, then, over newspaper on concrete to catch the detris, turn the inlet end vertical and tap it, forcefully, on the the newspaper, besides the fuel, you will problably have rust/junk/junk coming out, (compressed air is an option for the adventurous) that is what is blocking the fuel supply. the fuel pressure senders are thiry years old, and IMHO unreialable, inadequite. I have had at least a ten different SPICA alfa's as daily drivers over the last 20+ years, and not one of those cars would not run due to an internal problem with the FI pump. Now some were better than others, and external problems were numerous: improper timing(s), improper linkage adjustment, bad T/A, broken belt, etc; but the most common problem is the rear filter being clogged and remember when the fuel pump is off, the clog lessens as there is no pressure pulling the gunk up against the element of the filter.
 

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Hi John,
Most appreciate all the Spica info you have prepared in detail. a lifesaver. Just bought a 10/74 Production 2000 GTV ('75 model in Canada) and have a question and it has a Spica 237/2 pump with a model N8500 stamped on its plate. Are you familiar with this model and what characteristics does it have?
Mike in Vancouver, BC
 

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Discussion Starter #84
unicornbc said:
Hi John,
Most appreciate all the Spica info you have prepared in detail. a lifesaver. Just bought a 10/74 Production 2000 GTV ('75 model in Canada) and have a question and it has a Spica 237/2 pump with a model N8500 stamped on its plate. Are you familiar with this model and what characteristics does it have?
Mike in Vancouver, BC
Hi Mike -
A T237/2 pump is for a 1750cc 1971 engine, not a 2000cc engine which your car should have. You should check to be sure that the engine in your car is indeed a 2L and not a 1750 . . . . or someone fitted a 1750 injection pump in place of the original if it's indeed a 2L engine. Although the T237/2 delivers about the same amount of fuel at idle, it will probably be a little leaner in the upper ranges than the spec'd T255/1 pump.

You can ID the engine by looking on the front of the cylinder head for a casting mark:

1750 . . . . circle with an upside down triangle

2000 . . . . circle with a box in the middle and a diagonal line through the box
 

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Thanks John,
It is definitly a 2000 with the cube and diagonal head marking and correct block AR01500 series block. I think someone just replaced the Spica with a good working '71 unit after problems with original.
 

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Discussion Starter #86
You might want to keep an eye out on ebay for a used T255/1 pump if you can pick it up cheap. You can use it for a rebuild core whenever your 1750 pump finally goes. That'll put the engine back to spec. Look on the right side of the pump to see if you see any Wes Ingram rebuild markings. It'll be stamped into the aluminum casting and look like the marking on top. . . sort of an "I" and an "E" pushed together. The "HP 150" means the pump was further modified to high performance standard.
 

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I had Wes rebuild my pump earlier this year and it came back without being stamped with his mark. Also, came back without the cap over the reference screw. I just wanted to let people know that if someone claims to have a Wes Ingram rebuild and it doesn't have the markings they may not be trying to pull a fast one. On the other hand, it would be easy enough for an unscrupulous person to duplicate Wes' marks.
 

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Discussion Starter #88
No stamp and no cap? That's interesting. I suppose you could call Wes with a "T" number and see if/when it was rebuilt last, if you were buying a used pump that the owner claimed was rebuilt.
 

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Wow. Surprised he'd not mark one. Call him and ask did he forget or is it something he quit doing or what? For the money he charges, I'd certainly want a mark. <grin>
 

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hello all,

I'm replacing my 69gtv 1750 with a spica 2 liter motor. I'm trying to reuse my old TA. Do I need a gasket or sealant in the water jacket port on manifold where the TA plugs in to prevent coolant leaks when I install it on my new motor? I did find faint traces of some orange silicone like substance around the opening of the manifold when I removed it. I don't remember seeing any on the bottom where it is inserted to the spica pump though. Someone at Centerline suggested putting a rubber O ring there. It seems like the mounting flanges are so thin that they would bend rather than flattening the O rings with those puny 7mm nuts.

Also my 69 spica doesn’t have an electronic FCS. How would I add this missing wire lead to my newer T255 Ingram 165HP pump? There does seem to be a wire lead hang from under the fuel filter area that I have no idea what its function is.


I'm just dying to see what my new 2liter motor will feel like.

davbert
if youre swapping out a 1750, consider keeping those cams. the 1750's cams are cross-compatible with the 2000 and have a more aggressive duration. use the 1750 cams for performance, and the 2000 cams for fuel-efficiency and smog-tests
 

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I have found that Tuffy Oil Change, in Wesley Chapel, FL can get those gaskets. He should be listed in the phone book.
Just a suggestion.

Bernman38
 

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SPICA filters and gaskets, Wes Ingram's SPICA manual for sale

HI: just sold my 79 Spica equipped Spider. I have many parts for sale.(Dash gages, speedometer, tachometer, suspension straps, transmission tunnel boots (both of them) , switches for turnsignals etc.)
Anyone interested pls PM me.
Thanks,
Rich
 

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Solenoid lock nut wrench

Good news for you> Wes Ingram makes excellent tool. These were not available at the time I needed one.
I have none.
Good luck.
 

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I have a 74 gtv. It does not want to start with the electrical wire connected to the FUEL SHUTOFF VALVE. With wire removed it starts fine. Is the engine running rich with wire disconnected. What should I do?
 

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Discussion Starter #96
It's probably a shorted microswitch. First check that the two wires going to the microswitch on the engine side of the pump aren't twisted together and shorting out.

You can run it with the wire disconnected from the Fuel Cutoff Solenoid. If the engine is tuned correctly, you won't get burbling or backfiring. It will have no affect on your running mixture.

Next time you have the pump off the engine, replace the microswitch.
 

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SPICA cold start

Self Test for SPICA Injected Alfa Owners:

1. T F SPICA Injection pumps are pressure lubricated with engine oil.

2. T F SPICA Injection pumps do not require any preventative maintenance other than changing the dedicated oil filter every 12,000 miles.

3. T F SPICA Injection pumps do not suffer from internal corrosion problems because they are constantly bathed in clean oil .

4. T F SPICA Injection pumps have oil filters because they require more fine filtration than the normal engine filter can supply

5. T F What filter? I didn’t know my car had a separate oil filter for the injection pump.

6. T F I’d rather not take the 60 minutes a year to maintain my injection pump. I’d rather spend $750 on a rebuild than maintain my pump for the long haul.

Answers:

1. Trick question . . . . . PARTS of the injection pump ARE pressure lubricated. There are two sections to the injection pump. The Pump Section and the Logic Section are physically segregated. The Pump Section is pressure lubricated by the regular engine oil system, however, the Logic Section IS NOT. In pre-75 models (T255/1) and earlier models, the Logic Section relies on oil directly added to the Logic Section. It’s splash/bath lubrication system. 1975 and later models have a passageway that allow a slight bit of non-pressurized oil to ooze into the Logic System (but not much). In all models there is an overflow port in the logic section that allows excess oil to gravity drain back into the engine oil sump.

2. Another trick question . . . . . . . Theoretically, yes, according to the Alfa Owner’s Manual . . . only the oil filter. HOWEVER, the Alfa manual assumes you are using Alfa mechanics to maintain your pump. You will find in the book that they warn against ANY tampering or opening of an injection pump. Thirty years later, however, very few Alfa’s are really maintained by factory-trained technicians. I would say the vast majority of owners do a good bit of their own maintenance, either out of love or the lack of an experienced local Alfa mechanic. That said, IMHO it is important that your injection pump be given a fresh change of oil every year or so, especially on pre-75 cars. Even on later models, the oil can stagnate in the logic section and harbor moisture and acids that can cause corrosion of logic section parts. One popular item for rusting and failure in poorly maintained pumps is the internal compensator link retaining spring . . . . a typical example of a $5 part that when it rusts apart will instantly disable the injection pump.

3. FALSE. See question 2. This is especially true of engines that are not operated regularly and for long enough to allow the already “cool running” injection pump to burn out any existing condensation and moisture. If you drive your car to work every for a half-hour each way, you probably don’t have much to worry about. But if it’s just a short haul or weekend driver, you do need to be concerned.

4. FALSE. The reason the small oil filter is in the injection pump base is that the oil passage that the pump draws its oil pressure from is direct from the oil pump and prior to the main oil filter. So, the injection pump is receiving unfiltered engine oil directly from the sump.

5. If you answered TRUE, you are in desperate need of a tech manual or an experienced Alfa mechanic to do you oil changes.

6. If you’ve got that much money, send me some!


HOW TO CHECK THE LEVEL OF OIL IN THE LOGIC SECTION:

1. Remove the three screws holding in the Barometric Compensator (the triangular plate on top of pump. On a 74 and earlier model, note how the detent spring for the temperature lever is positioned. 75 and on don't have the lever.

2. Carefully lift up the BC out of its cavity. The BC consists of a flexible bellows that expands and contracts with atmospheric pressure. You can puncure it if your not careful. The BC is not attached to anything inside the pump. It merely provides a calibration "stop" for the compensator link. DO NOT MOVE THE THROTTLE WHILE THE BC IS OUT OF THE PUMP BODY. Be careful with the BC, it's somewhat fragile. Place it in a protective tray or box on soft cloth. Guard it from damage.

3. Look down into the cavity of the pump. You should see some oil in there. A large syringe, such as those you can buy at Walmart to measure 2 cycle engine oil makes a good tool to suck out the old oil. Use a thin enough hose to fish down into the bottom of the pump and suck out the old oil. It helps the suction process if the oil is warm. Fill the cavity with about a half pint of clean engine oil. There is an overflow drain inside the pump that will allow excess oil to drain back into the sump, so you don't have to worry about overfilling.

4. Carefully replace the BC and snug up the screws.

5. Smell the old oil you removed from the logic section. If it smells like gasoline, you may have a worn FI pump that is allowing fuel past the pump plungers.
6. On cold starts lots of black stuff comes out of the tail pipe. Is there a cold start device in the SPICA that is ajustable or is it something I have no control over. I makes a mess on the drive way.
 

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Discussion Starter #99
The cold start system is somewhat adjustable, although soot is not unusual. Mine does that a little, as well.

You might want to check your pump gap as well as making sure the Cold Start Solenoid is not sticking.

How does it run otherwise?
 

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SPICA cold start

Please explain where is the cold start sol. and how is it adjusted, and what is the pump gap and how to adjust it.
The car runs fine. It has 170 lb pressure in all four cylinders with the throttle open and I think this is low, but then the engine has 110,000 miles on it. I have also timed the engine advanced, before TDC even though the timing mark for fixed advance is after TDC.
Your help is much appreciated.
Thanks
 
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