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Discussion Starter #1
My FCS spring is no longer very springy. I am spraying it with penetrating fluid but it seems to stick when pushed down. It does tend to stay in the up position OK. Can I service this?

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Discussion Starter #4
I have a 1978 Spider that has about 55K. Been sitting for a long time. The CSS seems to work and the car runs for a few seconds then dies. When I pulled the FCS I noticed the lever underneath was sticking when pushed down. It actually looked to be in the down position which would explain the no run situation.

Having read the SPICA bench testing guide I was wondering if the FCS lever would be something that a good bench cleaning could improve? Or is this a Wes rebuild situation. Not sure I want to wait 8+ months for a rebuild so I was looking for other options.
 

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Lots of needs ... no good answers.. "long time" is not measurable in old car lingo.. This is probably a case for a person in the know in your area to short circuit the book language and pay a visit. I find the manual Wes put together great BUT they don't discuss long term sleep revivals. I think that is a highly underrated. I don't think a SPICA is a light switch or bulb that works 30 years after you shut it off . Perhaps someone who wants to wade in with far more experience than I can keep this ball rolling for you. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Lots of needs ... no good answers.. "long time" is not measurable in old car lingo.. This is probably a case for a person in the know in your area to short circuit the book language and pay a visit. I find the manual Wes put together great BUT they don't discuss long term sleep revivals. I think that is a highly underrated. I don't think a SPICA is a light switch or bulb that works 30 years after you shut it off . Perhaps someone who wants to wade in with far more experience than I can keep this ball rolling for you. Good luck.
Yes these cars don't do long decades slumbers well. This fellow did not wake up refreshed at all. Mr Spica is clearly still asleep.
 

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This is the only region of the pump not lubricated with oil.
I never heard about this leaver been stuck, but your attemt of spraying it with WD40 or an equivalent sounds good. Will the leaver move up and down if you do that by hand? Should move fairly easy.
I will have a look at my sparepumps tommorow and see if I can find an solution.

Bernhard
 

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Discussion Starter #10
This is the only region of the pump not lubricated with oil.
I never heard about this leaver been stuck, but your attemt of spraying it with WD40 or an equivalent sounds good. Will the leaver move up and down if you do that by hand? Should move fairly easy.
I will have a look at my sparepumps tommorow and see if I can find an solution.

Bernhard
Yes it moves freely. When I pull up the spring forces it back to level. When I push down it sticks in the down position. I can then pull it up easily back to level. It feels like something is gummy. That's why I emailed Wes and asked if there was a bench solution I can do.
 

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The normal level of the lever is up.
It is pushed down by the pin coming out of the FCS when actuated by the micoswitch on decelaration. After it should come back up to the normal level.
Second the lever is pushed down by the FCS itself with setting the fuelmixture.

I just removed the housing of the lever off the pump. 3 little screws ( 8mm wrench ) then you can pull the housig off the pump. This should also be possible with the pump in sito. Be carefull there is a tiny little surface gasket there as well between pump and lever housing.
This way you might have better ability to penetrate the shaft and get him working freely again. The lever is also fixed to the shaft with a small srew ( 7mm wrench ) but I would not touch it because the lever has to have a fixed position on the shaft. The spring is fixed behind the lever and another bigger slotted screw.


So as Wes stated a couble of years ago to me the FCS and the microswitch are only a redundant device for fuel cut of, because the pump has got a mechanical fuelcutoff built in as well.
He suggested only to work on the microswitch when the pump has to go for an overhaul anyhow.
The microswitch will give you a fuel cut off with reffs below 1500 whereas the built in cut off device starts below 1200 reffs.
Older pumps had no FCS at all. They only worked with the built in one.

So if you cant get the lever working freely and if you do not want to take the pump of the car, just disconnect the FCS from the microswitch and see what happens. Dont forget proper insolation of the plug.
Because I think what happens is you can start the engine and as soon as it runs you let go the accelarator pedal and the microswitch engages the FCS . The lever does not come back quickly enough ( rather slowly ) and the engine dies.

Good luck

Bernhard
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The normal level of the lever is up.
It is pushed down by the pin coming out of the FCS when actuated by the micoswitch on decelaration. After it should come back up to the normal level.
Second the lever is pushed down by the FCS itself with setting the fuelmixture.

I just removed the housing of the lever off the pump. 3 little screws ( 8mm wrench ) then you can pull the housig off the pump. This should also be possible with the pump in sito. Be carefull there is a tiny little surface gasket there as well between pump and lever housing.
This way you might have better ability to penetrate the shaft and get him working freely again. The lever is also fixed to the shaft with a small srew ( 7mm wrench ) but I would not touch it because the lever has to have a fixed position on the shaft. The spring is fixed behind the lever and another bigger slotted screw.


So as Wes stated a couble of years ago to me the FCS and the microswitch are only a redundant device for fuel cut of, because the pump has got a mechanical fuelcutoff built in as well.
He suggested only to work on the microswitch when the pump has to go for an overhaul anyhow.
The microswitch will give you a fuel cut off with reffs below 1500 whereas the built in cut off device starts below 1200 reffs.
Older pumps had no FCS at all. They only worked with the built in one.

So if you cant get the lever working freely and if you do not want to take the pump of the car, just disconnect the FCS from the microswitch and see what happens. Dont forget proper insolation of the plug.
Because I think what happens is you can start the engine and as soon as it runs you let go the accelarator pedal and the microswitch engages the FCS . The lever does not come back quickly enough ( rather slowly ) and the engine dies.

Good luck

Bernhard
Thank you Bernhard for taking the time. I have an engine start with CSS but no run which lead me to the FCS and the lever beneath. What I discovered last night was as the engine starts for a few revolutions the lever is pulled down by the SPICA without the FCS attached. Any ideas why that may be?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank you Bernhard for taking the time. I have an engine start with CSS but no run which lead me to the FCS and the lever beneath. What I discovered last night was as the engine starts for a few revolutions the lever is pulled down by the SPICA without the FCS attached. Any ideas why that may be?
Wes Ingram said a slow moving FCS decel lever usually points to rust in the center section where oil or penetrants cannot easily reach. He also mentioned that the plungers in the pump do not usually survive the water moisture in the gas requiring that they replace all the plungers and barrels in a rebuild. So I would guess I am dealing with a rust situation in the pump from sitting in storage for decades.

I am going to pull the pump and have a closer look. Thanks to all for your input.
 
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