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Discussion Starter #1
Is there a special tool to remove the screws? Seems like a typical phillips, I tried them all, and is not the right fit.

Any ideas?

1647847


thanks
 

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I would select a 1/4" drill bit which is about the size of the bolt (6 mm, I suspect) .. as I suspect that is what the bolt is ..then center the drill in the Philips and drill deep enough to separate the head from the bolt... Drill speed should be slow and oiled. This will release the sill with no damage to it .. Then the next challenge is removing what is left of the bolt.
 

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Seems like a typical phillips,
Yea, 50+ years ago, it was a typical phillips. Now it's a very rusted phillips. You might make some headway if you can pick out the rust deposits that have accumulated in the screw head with an awl, allowing the phillips bit to fully engage. You might succeed by using a impact driver - the kind you whack with a mallet.

But in the end, divotandtralee's advice is probably the way to go. Once the sills are off, you can apply some penetrating oil and may be able to twist out the stumps of the screws using vise grips.
 

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After cleaning out the hole like Alfajay says you can also use a tiny dab of valve grind compound on the tip of your screwdriver to give it more grip in the screw head. Still need to push crazy hard.
 

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If you can get a clean shot at it, the cut off wheel on a dremel can turn any phillips into a slotted screw - just cut a slot across the head. I do it all of the time. In this case it may be too recessed into the sill and you risk the the cutoff wheel damaging the trim. Alfajays suggestion plus the grind compound may do the trick though
 

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If you can get a clean shot at it, the cut off wheel on a dremel can turn any phillips into a slotted screw - just cut a slot across the head. I do it all of the time. In this case it may be too recessed into the sill and you risk the the cutoff wheel damaging the trim. Alfajays suggestion plus the grind compound may do the trick though
If you try this route, what I have done that helps is to use some white silicone and fill in the valley/recess around the screw, and just up on to the the sill top area, (sorta creating a donut of silicone around the screw). Then, when you come in with the dremel, you can see where the wheel is cutting a little better, while providing protection for the sill surrounding the screw. Once it off, the silicone will usually peel right off, but any residue will clean up with citrus scrub cleaner without any scratching or damage to the stainless.
In any event, I of course first let it soak in penetrating oil overnight first, so once you can get some kind of grip on it, (or what’s left) it will give it a better chance of turning easily.
Good luck!
 

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Wow, you guys with the cut-off wheels are braver than I am. I'd sacrifice the screw in a heartbeat before risking damage to the ss trim. Drilling off the head of a phillips screw, as divotandtralee suggests, is pretty foolproof.
 

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Wow, you guys with the cut-off wheels are braver than I am. I'd sacrifice the screw in a heartbeat before risking damage to the ss trim. Drilling off the head of a phillips screw, as divotandtralee suggests, is pretty foolproof.
FWIW, I wasn't implying that route as a preference, and certainly not to save the screw. Typically I would drill the head off too, but I have slipped when doing this before as well, and damaged surrounding material. Sometimes I choose the method of cutting a groove into the head of the screw, and then use a blade screwdriver to back it out. I wouldn't say I'm brave...
-maybe I'm just not that confident of my abilities with either method!
I was just suggesting whatever method you use, the silicone is an easy way to help protect the surrounding stainless.
 

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Have you tried an impact driver. The smack from the hammer might break it loose?

Pete
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks all for the great advice.

The impact and drilling is working perfect. Some are coming out with the impact and others with the drilling.
 
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