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Hi All! My 2.0 L engine had fitted Lodge 2HL sparkplugs and according to the PO information it was an expensive purchase some years ago. I don't know if they are originals or not but the time is here for replacement. I see many alternatives looking in the internet and I know that NGK are very popular. However, I would like to know if there are other plugs well tried and tested with good performance in the correct hot range apart from the popular NGK. My engine has high compression pistons (calculated CR is 10.4) with 123 distributor and I use 98 or 100 RON unleaded gasoline.
 

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Decades ago, the company I was with became a national distributor for NipponDenso spark plugs. A couple of years earlier, while I was a traveling salesman for the company, driving 50-60,000 miles per year in my 78 Honda Accord, I tried both NGK and ND in my car. The ND, which were original fitment, produced about 2mpg more than the NGK.

As I came to better know the ND product, my impression was not only superior quality, but a fairly aggressive commitment to technological development. They introduced several good concepts that NGK later copied.

I’ve long since retired and haven’t kept up, but my impression is that ND sort of lost the marketing war with NGK and Bosch, so they’re becoming harder to find. I turn them up on EBay as sellers try to dispose of remnant stocks. They are still original equipment on many Japanese cars.

They used to offer many optional configurations for otherwise interchangeable plugs. Gold, platinum, iridium, one, two, three, four electrodes, etc. I just installed eight NDs in my 1999 916 with 2.0 twin spark engine. Two different part number plugs for each cylinder. Running great, and cheaper than NGK.

Note, I have no complaint with NGK. They are reliable go-to plugs. I keep stock of both NGK and ND for my cars. With your presumably higher-dome pistons, I would be careful about using projecting tip plugs.

When I was the parts manager at an Alfa dealer in the 70s, the first thing our techs did during new-car prep was replace the Lodges with Champion N7Y plugs. I never heard why, but we ended up with a heap of new Lodges going into the bin.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Decades ago, the company I was with became a national distributor for NipponDenso spark plugs. A couple of years earlier, while I was a traveling salesman for the company, driving 50-60,000 miles per year in my 78 Honda Accord, I tried both NGK and ND in my car. The ND, which were original fitment, produced about 2mpg more than the NGK.

As I came to better know the ND product, my impression was not only superior quality, but a fairly aggressive commitment to technological development. They introduced several good concepts that NGK later copied.

I’ve long since retired and haven’t kept up, but my impression is that ND sort of lost the marketing war with NGK and Bosch, so they’re becoming harder to find. I turn them up on EBay as sellers try to dispose of remnant stocks. They are still original equipment on many Japanese cars.

They used to offer many optional configurations for otherwise interchangeable plugs. Gold, platinum, iridium, one, two, three, four electrodes, etc. I just installed eight NDs in my 1999 916 with 2.0 twin spark engine. Two different part number plugs for each cylinder. Running great, and cheaper than NGK.

Note, I have no complaint with NGK. They are reliable go-to plugs. I keep stock of both NGK and ND for my cars. With your presumably higher-dome pistons, I would be careful about using projecting tip plugs.

When I was the parts manager at an Alfa dealer in the 70s, the first thing our techs did during new-car prep was replace the Lodges with Champion N7Y plugs. I never heard why, but we ended up with a heap of new Lodges going into the bin.
Really interesting story indeed! I would never fit projected tip plugs! I am aware of the risk. My FIAT 124 Sport Coupe(1608cc TC engine) is running on Champion N6Y (this is also the proposed plug into owners manual). N7Y is colder than N6Y, am I correct? I noticed for the same temp index has many variations iridium, platinum etc. Marketing games I suppose, beyond any real need.
 

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Someone out of Europe here on this forum suggested the BERU UXF56 for Twin Sparks. I tried them on my Twin Spark. Later while waiting for some parts, I took 4 of them out and installed them in my GTV (non-twin spark) and they worked better than the NGKs that were in there and did not foul. I was having fouling issues with the GTV and was constantly removing and cleaning the plugs.

 
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