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I have, very recently, become the owner of a white 1974 GTV 2000. Last week it was carefully removed from the exact spot in a family barn where it spent the last 20 years. The 25K miles, one owner car is remarkably rust free. The interior is in exceptional condition. Glass, brightwork and rubber are all in great shape.
I am 75 years old and have built cars all of my life but I'm out of my element, here. I buy wrecked cars and rebuild them for, mostly, my enjoyment; usually late model Toyota/Lexus products.
I plan to insure that the engine is not seized; I'm not going to try to start the car unless I find that it will increase the value, substantially. Whatever I do, I will do (or, have it done) correctly within the guidelines; ""do no harm.
So, here is my long-winded question; should I start the car or pass it on in it's current condition. I understand that it will be expensive (I'm OK with that) to do the fuel tank, lines fuel injection system, et al, but will it be a lot more valuable if it is in running condition?
 

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Congratulations on your find. Do you know why the car was parked? Chances are the fuel injection pump is shot. If there is a strong gas smell in the engine oil, that would indicated a bad injection pump.

A fuel injected car that has sat for this long is going to require quite a bit of work to get running. So, it really all depends on how much time and effort you want to put in it. If you plan to get the car running, here are a couple of suggestions:

Poor a small amount of marvel mystery oil in each cylinder to lubricate the top of the rings
Change all fluids
Change all filters including the fuel injection pump oil filter
Drain and clean the fuel tank.
Before initial start, remove the cam cover and poor some engine oil across the cams and cam lobes.
Disconnect the coil wire and crank the engine to build oil pressure
Reconnect coil wire and start the engine
 

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Gator you are definitely not out of your element with a 74 GTV. Its pretty easy to work on and there are great folks on this BB that will help you sort through it. If you were to buy the 'brooklands' book on Alfa romeo that, your already present mechanical skills, and your 75 years of common sense walking the Earth is all that you need (plus a few 13mm wrenches) to get this car running!

Go for it!
 

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it sounds as if you just bought this to turn it over for a profit, so why throw money at it?
If you wanted it for yourself to keep, that is a very different matter.

I'd pour oil down the plug holes and turn the engine by hand
if it turns, advertise it like that...

GTV barn find, extreemly solid car, engine turns freely, needs recommissioning.

You'll get the same money for a barn find whether it starts or doesn't, imo.
 

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Brian's advice on how to start a long resting barn find is right on...I did exactly that when I got my long term barn find running.

However, if you're just going to flip the car, I agree with Dom. See if it turns over by hand, and then advertise it. There is more risk than reward in trying to get it to start, given the stated intent.
 

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I recommend adding Marvel's mystery oil in each cylinder and let it sit there for a couple of weeks before trying to turn the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks.

I would like to thank all of you for great information - that I'm comfortable accepting and I was having trouble finding. I have put Marvel's Mystery Oil in the cylinders and have stopped there. I will try to turn the engine over by hand in a week or so which makes sense to me. As an artist, I appreciate the elegance of a simple design, truly a beautiful car, and I understand the love people have for them but at 75 years old I'm not going to begin another long-time restoration (relationship). I'm in no hurry to sell the car, I actually enjoy owning it and talking about it with car friends. At some point I'll find it a new home with someone who has the energy to do it right. Thanks, again. What a valuable asset the Bulletin Board seems to be
 

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Hi there... you hit the nail on the head with your statement "As an artist, I appreciate the elegance of a simple design" I don't know if others feel like this but I certainly do. To me, older Alfa Romeo engines are as beautiful as jewelry especially compared to today's modern cars that are lost in a sea of plastic. Simplicity is a beautiful thing. It makes one's mind "relax" and allows for easier repairs. I don't know... that' just my own two cents worth. ;)
 

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You say remarkably rust free, but if it's been sitting on dirt in a barn, it's very likely the underside is badly rusted. Have you made a detailed inspection from underneath? I am always very skeptical of claims of rust free-ness in a GTV, especially when the inspection is topside outside visual only and not inside the floorpans, rockers, A-pillar, jacking points, etc.

Obviously an running car will be a lot more valuable, since the prospective buyer will at least have an idea of the money that needs to be thrown at the engine, injection pump, transmission, and rear axle.
 

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Roadtrip - The barn doesn't have a dirt floor but to your point, there is rust. Without meaning to mislead, I said remarkable because I would have guessed that it would have been much worse. I'll be back in town in a couple of weeks and will be able to put it on the lift and do a real inspection of the underside. I would appreciate the information, and it would aid my search considerably, to know where the "prone-to-rust" areas are hidden.
 
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