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Discussion Starter #1
I thought this would make a great topic to be discussed as it applies to both Spiders, Alfetta's from 75 and up cars. Here is the quote that I felt would be a good start to the discussion:
As a native of this beautiful but politically crazy state of California, I will once again have to pass smog April next year for my 1976 Alfetta GT. It will easily pass after installing a new T.A. and a Cal Cat. last year. No other state requires smog tests for 43 y.o. cars...It's just part of the price for living here........
Here is a short history of smog and Alfas.

I started my walk with Alfa Romeo 49 years ago with my 65 Veloce. It had twin carbs so it was exempt under the new smog rules. However, my sisters, Giulia Normale had to have some kind of hose kit to make it smog-legal. We jump to the early 105's and they closed off the road draft tube and rerouted the crankcase vapors into the airbox.
1969 Spica was introduced and the CO level was below 4%. No other smog equipment. No cars in 1970. In 1971 we get a redesigned smog pump with a micro-adjustable fuel cutoff solenoid and the C) level drops to 2.5%.
1972-1974 the system remains the same but with a different cam profile in the Spica pump to lean the cars out to 2%. Still no other smog equipment.
1975 we get a more lean pump at 1.8%, retarded cams, catalytic converter, retarded and advanced points, and an air pump to meet the new CA smog requirements. There was also a 49 state car in addition to the CA cars. The 49 state cars didn't have a cat that I can remember. They were tested to a different standard.
1976 everything stays the same but the cams were different and retimed differently.
1977-1979 the Spica pumps were leaner, the air pump pipes were pointed downstream instead of directly into the exhaust port. The exhaust manifold was changed from a 4 into one to a 2 into 2 manifold reducing the cracked manifolds splitting between 2 & 3.
1980-1981 we get the last of the Spica system improvements. The smog limits were at max for the mechanical pump and in the middle of 1981, the Spica was dropped for the electronic injection.

So, here is the crux after reading a short bio of how all of this came about. In California as far back as 10 years or more when I bought a 1976 Spider I went to get it registered. The smog shop said it would not pass and have to go to a referee to decide if it passes or fails. I had put on a set of stainless headers but the pipes didn't have the CARB placard that said it was legal. The smog shop said if I could find a manifold for that year they would pass the car as it was a 49 state car and not cat. No manifolds to be had anywhere. I was ready to take the car to the referee and a buyer came along from Washington state to take the car there.

What gets me is that we have a 40+-year-old car that is being held hostage by the state of CA for smog rules that should have exempted the car after 25 years. The car has to have a closed vapor recovery system, non-venting cap and pass with ever-tightening carbon emissions. Even if it falls slightly outside the limits it fails. I can bring a car from Canada that is more than 25 years old but I would have to bring it into some kind of compliance in CA and pay a $300 environmental fee.

So the question is after all of this, is why should our now "collector cars" be held to a standard that puts our cars out of compliance if parts are no longer available or can't pass a more stringent standard than when the car was built? It isn't our fault parts are not available since Alfa no longer is required to carry parts past 10 years. The number of our cars on the road is minuscule and would barely add to the air any pollutants. No other state makes our cars toe the line. So if I can't get parts or make the car pass, that means I can't drive my car. What happens we don't have Wes Ingram rebuilding pumps?

Ok, I have said my peace. Comments are welcome.
 

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The challenge is to keep this from becoming political. California has more cars than probably any three other USA states combined. Having worked in other countries with NO emissions controls, I’ve also seen the pendulum swung the other way... headaches from a 15-minute taxi ride. I lived in CA most of my life, so modding Alfa’s was always out of the question. Here in oregon, smog controls are under county jurisdiction... so Portland requires them and Eugene and Linn/Lane counties don’t. But we have no congestion here, and Portland is legendary for traffic mess , as is CA. As your thread starter said, it’s a price of living there, with too many people, houses and, of course, cars...
I’m interested in other states and counties (and countries!) input. BTW, after living in the UK for 9 months, it seems that they have a pretty restrictive process there for regular cars, but don’t know about collector/vintage cars.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It starts with the legislature to fix it. There are counties in CA that have no smog checks just like in Arizona. If you live in the Phoenix area you have smog checks. I am not sure how far back they make you smog your car. It is hit and miss. Where I live up in the mountains, we are exempt from any smog checks ( guess it blows to the east or south). It just seems ridiculous to smog a car 40+ years old. After all, how many of these old Alfas are left in CA?
 
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