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Discussion Starter #1
I had it all planned out to replace the reactionrod and two shifter rod bushings when I tended the transmission in our '93 164L. However, it turns out that the bushings were all just fine. How can this be, you say? When we were disassembling things to get into the transmission to replace input shaft bearing, we found that the shifter control rod was not tightly screwed to the socket-ended shaft which is attached to it. The play in the screw joint was enough to be a pain and source of concern in the shifter mechanism.

Lesson: if you have a loose shifter in the cat, don't immediately blame the reaction rod or shifter bushings. If we'd looked at the linakge, we could have seen where the slop was, and it would have been in a readily accessible place. I've had the replacement bushings for over 6 months now, awaiting the occasion to get into the mechanism. Then it turned out hot to be the bushings. It was easier to tighten the screw than ti press out and in the bushings, so it wasn't what you could call a loss, except for a few years of sloppy shifting that could have been better. This may not help you, but it might, and it's a darned sight easier than the bushing route, which would have left us with the same sloppy shifting if I'd done it all by itself.

And if you have a tight clutch mechanism, you may have a distorted input shaft sleeve (throwout bearing sleeve). That's what appears to have been our sole problem with the clutch (aside from a missing flywheel cover that let dirt and oil collect as grinding paste on the clutch friction plate and wear it and the pressure plate down very smooth).

Michael (about to head for the shower)
 

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I had it all planned out to replace the reactionrod and two shifter rod bushings when I tended the transmission in our '93 164L. However, it turns out that the bushings were all just fine. How can this be, you say? When we were disassembling things to get into the transmission to replace input shaft bearing, we found that the shifter control rod was not tightly screwed to the socket-ended shaft which is attached to it. The play in the screw joint was enough to be a pain and source of concern in the shifter mechanism.

Lesson: if you have a loose shifter in the cat, don't immediately blame the reaction rod or shifter bushings. If we'd looked at the linakge, we could have seen where the slop was, and it would have been in a readily accessible place. I've had the replacement bushings for over 6 months now, awaiting the occasion to get into the mechanism. Then it turned out hot to be the bushings. It was easier to tighten the screw than ti press out and in the bushings, so it wasn't what you could call a loss, except for a few years of sloppy shifting that could have been better. This may not help you, but it might, and it's a darned sight easier than the bushing route, which would have left us with the same sloppy shifting if I'd done it all by itself.

And if you have a tight clutch mechanism, you may have a distorted input shaft sleeve (throwout bearing sleeve). That's what appears to have been our sole problem with the clutch (aside from a missing flywheel cover that let dirt and oil collect as grinding paste on the clutch friction plate and wear it and the pressure plate down very smooth).

Michael (about to head for the shower)
Sorry if I am asking stupid question, what exactly do ya mean by sloppy shift?? just want to compare with mine and get an idea of wht ya mean.

-Pavan.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
more details

What I mean is this: the gearshift lever should be fairly tightly coupled to the transmission shifting mechanism -- not much free travel before things start happening and limits are felt. The '93L had for years felt "loose" width 2 (two) or more inches of travel of the knob before any action was detectable. You could put our transmission in gear and then move the shifter left/right by a LOT before feeling the limits of travel.

A worn-out reaction rod bushing would let the shifter travel a significant amount before any force was applied effectively to the tranny shifting rods. Our reaction rod bushing seemed in fair shape, with the center metal sleeve being loose in its rubber surroundings (I applied some Permatex Ultra Black to it to stiffen this up a bit). But in the shifter mechanism itself, there is a rod (A) coupled directly to the driver's shift rod, and which passes through the box on top of the transmission. It is bolted to a transverse arm (B) with a socket on the end, which itself mates to a ball-end rod (C) similarly tied to the tranny master control rod. Our socket-ended rod (B) was loosely attached to rod (A).

If anyone else has excess travel in his shift mechanism, particularly L/R orientation, I'd recommend his checking how tight the bolts are in this interface box. At most you might need to pull the airbox to get at this. I think the coolant tank might be OK in place, but maybe it should be pulled too.

Michael (hoping this helps someone)
 

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Michael, I just noticed this, however, I only see one hex bolt under the black cover on the transmission. All three of those bushings are new on mine. Are there any other bolts to tighten?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Sean,

I don't remember any others to cause woes. The single small (8x1?) bolt was what seems to have caused our shifter slop on the '93L. It's been adequately tight since we did this nearly a year ago. We're speaking of the socket-ended rod that bolts to the shaft passing through the small upper compartment on the tranny. This shaft is called "speed selector control lever" in the pic above in post #3. The "attaching screws" are on the engine side of the collar with the socket-ended rod. I think it's only one screw, but can't remember.

The splined collar with the ball-end rod shown at the far right edge of the inset circle in the picture _could_ also have a its tightening screw loose. That would be poor form and allow for the splined connection to work around and damage the spline joint. So there _are_ two screws you might consider. The splined joint screw is oriented along the axis of the car. The other screw is oriented along the axis of the engine. I hope this helps.

You might try having someone work the shifter while you're looking at the business end of the mechanism to see if you can detect some slop in the action.

Michael
 

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Is there any trick to removing the gearshift lever knob on the 1995LS 5-spd? Just trying to replace a worn-down one.
 

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I may have just found the procedure in the CarDisc. removing the lever, placing it in a soft-jawed vise, etc, etc.
Sounds a bit convoluted to simply replace the knob.
No shortcuts?
 

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While you're in the vicinity, take the opportunity to look for stress cracks on the gearbox end of the speed selector rod. I had an increasing slop for some time. One day the rod broke on my way back from work. It was pouring that night.

If you see signs of stress, weld a strip of 4mm thick steel plate extending into the round section of the rod, drill holes on the plate and re-assemble with wide washers. As the rod is just a piece of tubing with a crimped end and a bracket at the rear, it will crack where the section changes from round to flat. Luckily it's very easy to disassemble.
 

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shortcuts to knob removal? Mine was stuck and stuck good. Knowing I wasn't going to reuse it, I simply went after it with a utility knife. It should have just popped off but it was kinda welded on the shift lever. I then cut down the lever about an inch and put a new round Momo on it. Love it.

I too had chased a slop in the shifter and first changed the reaction rod bushing which helped a little. Follwed Mr T's thoughts, no difference. Learned to live with it. Ciao, chris
 

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you just need to pull it not turning it and if you cn direct me were to buy one that fits lift and reverse i will thank you. mine is a real leater not plastic
kobbi
 
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