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Does anyone recognize this headlight bucket as being from a production model or was it specific to Siata? And, how does a retaining rim attach? A photo or a drawing of a complete unit would be incredibly helpful. As you can see mine aren't exactly in good condition. Thanks -
 

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What model of Siata are you referring to? Some used Carello, some Marchal.
Anton
 

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Anton,

It's a 208SL-series car, bodied by Stab. Farina. These are the original buckets and I'm trying to figure out what the balance of the assembly originally comprised.

Thanks -

Stephen
 

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Anton,

It's a 208SL-series car, bodied by Stab. Farina. These are the original buckets and I'm trying to figure out what the balance of the assembly originally comprised.

Thanks -

Stephen
That's also known as a Daina(not Diana) and was largely based on Fiat 1400 mechanicals. I believe those are Carello buckets. Try Matt Jones at Re-originals in Texas. He's not cheap but he comes up with some amazing stuff.
Anton
 

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Monte Carlo & Anton,

Thank you for the replies. The diagram from John deBoer is very helpful as are the leads.

Anton, it's actually not a Daina - see the attached picture of it new in Euclid Ohio circa late 1952. It started life as a 1951 Ford two-door, was sent to Siata via Tony Pompeo and came back as a convertible. According to John's records it's the highest known Stab. Farina body number and may well have been the last car built by them.

Back on topic, if anyone out there has these parts please don't hesitate to contact me via PM.

Thanks,

Stephen
 

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OK, my bad. I've seen one of those cars(maybe that one) in southern California maybe 25 years ago and I had an email exchange with someone who had one under restoration by someone in Germany a few years ago.
Photos always help in this type of discussion.
I still believe those are Carello lights.
Siata's type designations tend to be rather confusing at times.
Anton
 

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Carello headlamp units

Carello was not the only maker of parts for these lights but was the predominant supplier to most builders of cars in Italy. This style bucket was made in several sizes so we will need to know the diameter of the bucket in order to have a clue as to what you are searching for. I'm afraid that there is no definitive "one-size" for the headlamp units used even in Siata Daina in all of its iterations. Since your Siata-Ford is unique (so far as we know), we cannot know which light was used unless you give us some more information. I have some buckets that I suspect will be too small for your application but who knows? It will not be all that difficult to find in Italy with just a bit more information. it is also possible to fabricate a close approximation.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I was digging around in the piles of parts I've accumulated with this project and found what appear to be the original rims. Anton was correct in that they are in fact Carello.

The rims say:
F.Carello & Co.
App. N. 170-2
Lamp 35/35

Per John's suggestion - I measured the bucket and the o/d of the outside lip measures between 180mm and 185mm - it's not perfectly circular. And the entire bucket is approximately 190mm in diameter.
 

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Carello headlight bucket

Stephen,

You have heard from three very knowledgeable people on this topic. Maybe I can be of a bit more help. To answer the question in your original post - no, the headlight bucket you show is not specific to Siata. Nor is it specific to Stabilimente Farina, the coachbuilder where your car got a facelift. It is part of a Carello headlight system, like the page in the Fiat parts book supplied by John. There are different versions of this system, again the page from the Fiat parts book shows two. There are probably more but the differences can be very subtile and as John indicates, different sizes too. Some Carello version of this system, (the light/bucket unit pivoting by a single bolt to a inner bucket to allow for headlight adjustment), is common on Siata's, St. Farina and many other Italian cars of the time. You can see Carlo's bucket is similar to yours but not the same. And as Tony suggests, at the time some Italian cars had Marchals (some Fiat 8Vs and 250 Ferrari for example).

On to the second question in your original post. How does the rim attach. Below is a bucket that I figure is identical to the one you show in your original post (second photo). It is from my Alfa 1900 Stabilimente Farina, (first photo, Alfa factory photo). Overall diameter 190mm, inner lip 185mm, notice on both the turned up part of the lip at the top of the bucket. Further notice on mine a threaded tab which appears missing due to rust on yours. The rim hooks on to the turned up lip then is pulled over the threaded tab and the attachment screw goes through the rim to the tab. Again, there are different versions but this is likely yours. Note also there are versions of this with one rim, like the 208 spyder. And there are some with an inner and outer rim. The latter looks to be the case on your car.

Finally, and you didn't ask this. This is the headlight glass I would suggest is most likely to be on your car (third photo), there is another that is nearly as likely but this is the one I'd expect. I can send a pic of the other if you are interested.

Ok, not finally. In the factory pic of my car. If you enlarge it you can see inner and outer rim. The outer rim attaches to the body and not the bucket arrangement we are discussing. BTW, the production date of my car, according to Alfa, is May 23, 1952.


If you sent a pic of your rim maybe we can get a little more information. Also, for me, I'd like to see a pic of your tail lights. I'm sure John would be interested if you find the 4 digit St. Farina body number on any of the pieces you take off the car.

Last thing. As I said this bucket is "common" on early '50's Italian cars. That doesn't mean they are easy to find. Start with first series 1900 sedans. A little more common than some of the other cars we've been discussing.

Good Luck, Dan
 

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