Alfa Romeo Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
It looks like it might be the Fiat 2.0 8V, which would make this a Siata 208S. Or someone took a Daina and dropped the Otto Vu (or something similar) in there.

Edit: Further googling suggests that it's not the Otto Vu (altenator is in the wrong place, and that looks like more than a 70 degree V angle) but yea. Doesn't look like the original Fiat 4-cyl that would be in a Daina anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
That would be American Iron. A Studebaker V8, probably a 289ci.

Good looking project, I can't wait for John to give us his thoughts and history on the car!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,718 Posts
Suggestions and requests were made ...

... of the seller quite some time ago. I am told that the questions will be answered but that a bit of additional patience is required.

I asked for any known names of former owner(s). I've learned only that the car was in the same family ownership for some 51 years, perhaps in or near New York. I've asked for the Stabilimenti Farina body number and suggested where it might be found in its entirety. Even the last two digits, which should be found in quite a number of locations, would probably be enough as it is quite likely that the first two digits will be either "97" or perhaps "98". From the body number, I can almost certainly get very close to identifying (or approximating at a minimum) the chassis number. There is a possibility that the chassis number stamping was removed with a portion of the firewall that allowed the Studebaker engine installation?

As of a year ago, I had several leads collected to Siata-Studebaker cars. All of those leads have now been identified as belonging almost certainly to two cars, chassis SL*0203* and SL*0262*B, both of which were converted on the West Coast. The subject car is a third "Siata-Studebaker", evidently having been converted in the east. I am told that this car has been sold and that I may get to see it in about two weeks ... or maybe less. Then there may be more to share ... if I have the new owner's permission.

What I can say at the moment is that it is a "B" suffix chassis, numbered probably between SL*0225*B and SL*0306*B. There is a small chance that it might be numbered very slightly earlier or later than this range.

This car is not chassis 0224B, 0228B, 0229B, 0230B, 0231B, 0233B, 0236B, 0238B, 0239B, 0242B, 0244B, 0245B, 0246B, 0248B, 0251B, 0252B, 0253B, 0255B, 0256B, 0259B, 0262B, 0264B, 0266B, 0272B, 0272B, 0274B, 0280B, 0281B, 0286B, 0287B, 0288B, 0289B, 0293B, 0298B, 0300B, 0301B, 0304B, 0307B, 0308B, 0309B. Please note that not all of the cars mentioned here exist today and not all were "Gran Sport". This listing does not include an earlier style of "Gran Sport" that are known to have been numbered between SL*0203* and approximately SL*0220*.

A similar car was sold a few years ago out of the San Diego area and I am still awaiting the name of the family that owned it for a great many years. There is a small chance that the deceased owner brought that car from Pennsylvania to California after having raced it in the East. Sometimes a great deal of patience is required when one is waiting on someone else to realize that it might be important to preserve a bit of history ... which might then allow us a chance to do a bit of additional study that may be impossible in the future when more memories are lost to us!

Somewhere, there is a photo album that has already been tossed ... and perhaps another that is at risk. I am not naïve enough to think there was/is only one in each of those camps!

John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
There is an articlee in the June 1953 Hot Rod magazine on a Studebaker powered Daina.
The performance would not begin to approach that of a Tiger or Cobra.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,718 Posts
Siata Daina Gran Sport

These cars originally had a Fiat 1400 engine (roughly 1395cc) that was mildly tuned by Siata with two carburetors in place of one, some added compression (but not a lot) and some cam timing changes. Some engines were enlarged to 1500cc by Siata and they offered kits to raise the displacement to roughly 1800cc. The 1500cc version was the sportiest even though the 1800cc engine had more torque. The performance of the engine in any of its forms was not enough to overpower the excellent handling of the chassis and suspension. So, although the Gran Sport is a reasonably capable car, it is not particularly exciting to drive. It really needs another 30HP or more to make it begin to come alive.

By the time a 289 is fitted (or something similar from any maker), the performance characteristics will depend on the knowledge, desires and skill of the builder. As with the earliest Tiger and Cobra cars, the Siata-Studebaker examples were not truly engineered packages, so there were undoubtedly some shortcomings when compared to the perhaps more evolved nature of the Cobra and Tiger examples once they'd become "production cars". Even so, I'd bet that, if ever completed to a state that made a capable builder "satisfied", any of them might bring a smile to one's face ... and perhaps some moments of fear when the capabilities of the car were exceeded and some shortcomings revealed. It seems unlikely that any of the Siata-Studebaker examples known will be restored to that configuration, so we may never get to know from first-hand experience? Maybe I'll be proven wrong ... or maybe someone will build a retro-rod example one day?

I can say that the subject car appears to be on its original wheels and, if left as-is, they will not be strong enough to survive prolonged use with an American V8 of any sort.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
The Studebaker V8 shown in the Siata underhood shot is the smaller bore pre 1955 232 CID unit, but with a contemporary aftermarket twin 2v Stromberg carb setup. Clearly the car is original as nobody would opt for the small valved 232 after 1955. In 1955 besides the 259 there was briefly a 224 inch considerably destroked Stude V8 with the big valves that required the eventual large(!) bore of 3.563." Some were 9000 rpm capable as inboard hydroplane units. The weight of the Stude lump would have added 300 lbs to the Daina, and of course would have required a different axle assembly, perhaps Healey being the only candidate stout enough and of the right treadwidth.
I am surprised nobody guessed the engine was the Volvo "Sugga" designed almost exactly like the Stude -- while just as bulky was maybe 100 lbs. lighter for slightly over 200 cubes.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top