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Discussion Starter #1
Driving in my 1967 GTV last week, I felt a slight vibration then heard an explosion. :eek::eek:
The right rear tire failed in a strange way - the tread and sidewall separated.
Anyone ever seen a failure like this? :confused:

Bob Z.
 

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How old was the tire?

Twice while driving on the highway I've had a tire go flat for now apparent reason (no nails, scuffs, etc.) The strange thing is, they happened within a year of each other on some crappy General tires. I've since switched and haven't had any problems since.

The positive is you're ok, just think if it happened on the fronts while driving at highay speeds.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Questions

Thanks for replying. To answer some questions:
I've had the tires for 8 or 9 years but I do not know how old they are (When manufactured)
There was approximately 10,000 miles on them and the tread wear was pretty uniform - they were regularly rotated.
The car is always garaged There was absolutley no sign of dry-rot - I use Armorall regularly.
None of the other tires show signs of impending failure like sidewall lumps or tread separation.
There was no sign of overheating - the rim was cool and the smell of burning brakes was not present.
The car does not sit idle for extended periods. I drive it regularly (Not driving an ALFA is like not driving a Ferrari - big mistake)

All four tires will be replaced tomorrow.

Bob Z.
 

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Look at the side walls and find the date code. A four digit code is used - the first two digits are the week, the second two digits are the year. 0806 = 8th week of 2006.

If you find a three digit code that means they were manufactured before 2000 - the first two digits being the week, the third digit the year. 228 = 22nd week of 1998 (or 1988, or 1978...).



I'd be leery of automobile tires older than 5-6 years (even with armourall applied regularly). For my motorcycle I replace them if they are 3-4 years old.

Knowing the date code can help prevent buying 'new' tires that have been on the rack for a year.
 

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There was absolutley no sign of dry-rot...
Bob Z.
Bob,
Glad you weren't injured. I have tires (Firestones no less!) that I bought in 1989 that are on a (very) infrequently driven vehicle. They have less than 2000 miles on them and by "looking" at them, you'd think they are brand new. A visual inspection on tires is not a basis of whether the tires are safe to ride on. Everyone, as mentioned above, must look at date codes and junk tires older than 6 years (maybe even earlier:confused:) on a vehicle that is driven. I intend to drive my aforementioned vehicle on a regular basis this year and intend to replace the tires.

On another note, before anyone buys "new" tires, check the date code to make sure you aren't getting "stale" tires. I sent for motorcycle tires last year and the company I bought from had the nerve to send me one that was something like 5 years old. I called them and asked them *** they were trying to prove:mad:. They didn't even apologize and make up a story that it was an unintentional error but said the tire I wanted was special and hard to get and that I was lucky they had one at all:rolleyes:. That company was American Motorcycle Tire. I sent both of their POS tires back. FWIW, I called "Dennis Kirk" and after telling them of my story, the salesperson went back in his warehouse and documented that his tires were made fresh only 4 months prior. I got them 2 days later.
 
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