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Discussion Starter #1
I need some advice. I am a mechanical guy, but pretty unskilled with auto electrics. And that is the basis of the question I have.

I am doing a bare metal restoration of a 74 GTV (US with AC) and need to decide if I should keep the loom I have or get one of the new ones available on the market. Given my lack of skill in this area, my questions are:
  • Is there any reason, other than the money spent on a new one, to NOT replace the old loom? (Given my lack of skill, I could easily see myself spending more on troubleshooting issues with an old loom than just starting fresh.)
  • Will adding on AC wiring to a new loom I buy be an issue? (I will get help from someone knowledgeable for this modification.)
  • Anyone have experience with GTV looms from Alfaholics or AutoSparks? Any issues?
Thanks!
 

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chiuso per ferie
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Scott, there are probably the same number of people on each side of the fence on this topic.

If you have one of papajam's wire diagrams, you should be able to see what gauge wires are on the original harness. It would be important to know that the replacement harnesses use the right gauge wire on the various circuits.

I did not replace the harness on my car. I carefully unwrapped it, cleaned the wire bundles and re-wrapped. If I found broken wires, I replaced them from a salvaged harness. Most electricians would probably not approve of what I did.

Have you inspected the harness to see if any of the insulation is brittle? Can you see any corrosion on the wires at the terminals?
 

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Have you inspected the harness to see if any of the insulation is brittle? Can you see any corrosion on the wires at the terminals?
Ossodiseppia asks a good question: The condition of your existing harness is the key issue here. Wiring doesn't wear out, so your 46-year old harness may be just fine. Or a previous owner may have hacked it up, rodents may have chewed it, there could be corrosion issues, etc. etc. Without knowing that, it's tough to advise you on whether or not it needs replacing.

I'm not familiar with the factory A/C in these cars, but suspect that there isn't a lot of wiring involved. So sure, if you do need a replacement harness, and if replacements with A/C wiring aren't available, then you would need to add that wiring. And, to do it properly, you would need to unwrap the brand new harness, add in the A/C wires, and re-wrap it. Which kind of takes away some of the appeal of having a brand new, professionally made harness!

crackie said:
I am a mechanical guy, but pretty unskilled with auto electrics.
Whichever harness you decide to install - old or new - you are going to have to get familiar with electrical issues. The odds of rewiring a car and getting everything 100.0% right the first time are pretty slim. More likely, when you first hook things up, the heater blower will come on when you turn on the high beams. Using a multimeter and understanding what each circuit does becomes fairly important.
 

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Is your objective is to make the car look completely original or are you more concerned with functionality
The AC circuit is simple. My inclination would be to make it a separate harness but I am not an originalty guy.
I agree with Jay's comments. The least reliable parts of an old harness are the connectors unless it has been attacked or bodged so you have to consider whether you want to spend time carefully cleaning contacts.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes - I was thinking same with AC circuit. I figured it could just be "added on" to the harness and not have to be integrated into it. I am guessing (complete guess) Alfa may have done similar back in the day since so few GTVs had AC. So that may be a quasi-original approach anyway.

My concern with using the old harness is this...since those connectors and wires are 46 years old, if there are issues with them, I won't know until I have the car put back together. Then I am in the situation of tracking down electric gremlins (or very possibly paying someone given my lack of skills here) on a completely assembled car, which is pretty much always a pain...figuratively and often literally (lying on back under dashboard).

So my goal would be to avoid all of that with a new harness. Am I dreaming? Am I just opening a different can of worms with a new harness?

To Jay's point above I am actually looking forward to going through details of Papajam wiring diagrams and understanding each circuit, etc. I figure I'll need to know that to route wires correctly in any event. But it is the finding shorts, bad connectors, etc. after the car is assembled that I am not so game for if I can avoid it.
 

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You will still need to proof a new harness, testing each circuit to make certain it was manufactured properly.

I've got a '74 ac car, also. If you have the resources to buy new, you will save yourself a lot of time and hassle. R&Ring an original harness will require unwrapping the old harness anyway, so you'll have a new looking harness with old wire and connectors.
 

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chiuso per ferie
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You will still need to proof a new harness, testing each circuit to make certain it was manufactured properly.

I've got a '74 ac car, also. If you have the resources to buy new, you will save yourself a lot of time and hassle. R&Ring an original harness will require unwrapping the old harness anyway, so you'll have a new looking harness with old wire and connectors.

New terminals and connectors are available from several sources. I bought a great many from British Wire when I refurbished the harness for my car. They also have adhesive free electrical tape and vinyl tubing in various diameters as used on the wire harnesses.
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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If it were me and the car were down to a shell, a brand new harness would be incredibly tempting. The issue you're likely to run into is that there were a lot of changes to the GTV year to year and between US and Europe, especially on a '74 (all the Spica stuff, seat belt interlock system, H4 headlights with fogs vs. separate H1 high/low beams to name a few)

Is anyone making a proper US '74 wiring harness replacement? Classic Alfa sells a 2000GTV one but it's a Euro version.
 

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Push hard and live
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Time = money. Cheap costs too much.

If you’re doing a total, A1 restoration, buy a harness from Lionel Velez, if he makes them for a 105/115 GTV. It will probably cost you twice as much as harnesses offered by other vendors. You will easily regain the value in time saved during installation, accuracy of wires and colors, and quality of the connectors.

I’ve used two of his, and glad I did. Trust me, new harnesses are not all the same.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
So below is the one that is pretty tempting to me from AutoSparks in the UK. Note they call out the actual chassis # of the car they copied. They also have a different version for 71-73 GTVs, which inspires confidence.

1612961


I am also giving some thought to Lionel's as well since they come so highly recommended by a couple folks here on the BB.
 

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The "No AC" note makes me think they may also offer one intended for AC models.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Nope. Already asked them.
 

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Push hard and live
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One of the things Lionel does is take your old harness and compare it to his model. He could send the new one back ready for AC.

My Montreal had the wiring in place for AC, but had no AC.
 
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