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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone...

Looks like the first job I'm going to tackle on my GTV is going to be the head gasket... anybody done it in their garage before? Hard? Very hard? Ultra Hard? I'm a amateur myself... hopefully my uncle (japanese car and diesel bus mechanic) would be helpful...


And of course I would like to get all the books that's available for the Alfa, but $$$ is always an issue. Which one of them should I get FIRST so I can work on Alfas?? Any suggestion is welcome. Thank you. :)

Alfa Romeo Owners Bible - By Pat Braden

Alfa Romeo Giulia - Spider 1962-78 Shop Manual - By Brooklands

CarDisc

Thx.

:D
 

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alfa_chan said:

Alfa Romeo Owners Bible - By Pat Braden Alfa Romeo

I have the Owner's Bible. It's a good book I think, especially for a Alfa newbie.

The Book Cover's good topic's:

Maintaining your Alfa
Engine
Transmission & Drivetrain
Bodywork and Interior
etc etc
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Re: Re: Shop manuals... & head gasket

Sniady said:
alfa_chan said:

Alfa Romeo Owners Bible - By Pat Braden Alfa Romeo

I have the Owner's Bible. It's a good book I think, especially for a Alfa newbie.


Thank you Sniady..
I couldn't wait and I just bought the Owner's Bible this morning from Autobooks :D
Reading it right now... pretty good

Should I get the CarDisc or the Shop manual next? :confused:
I'm a computer geek and the idea of CarDisc is perfect for me. :)
 

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Re: Re: Re: Ro: Ro: Ro: Ru: Ru: Ru: Ra: Ra: Ra: Shop manuals... & head gasket

alfa_chan said:
Should I get the CarDisc or the Shop manual next? :confused:
I'm a computer geek and the idea of CarDisc is perfect for me. :)
Heimeng,

The CarDisc definately holds a lot of information, just heed the previous warnings. The interface is disappointing and printing sucks. And what ever you do, do NOT pay 70 bucks for one! You can find them for 20 something on eBay.

Here are some traditional manuals:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2408716608&category=6762

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2408495569&category=6762
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Re: Re: Re: Re: Ro: Ro: Ro: Ru: Ru: Ru: Ra: Ra: Ra: Shop manuals... & head gasket

67GTV said:
And what ever you do, do NOT pay 70 bucks for one! You can find them for 20 something on eBay.
Gotcha
eBay search in progress... :rolleyes:

Reoua:
 

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The Owners Bible is a decent book. Just ignore
the advice of using Champion plugs:D
Use Lodge.

As far as the head gasket, its quite a job for
a beginner. But with help from a mechanic, should
be do-able. If you have the Spica FI, be really
carefull when removing the thermostatic actuator.
Its real easy to break the tube. Remove the actuator,
dont try and bend it out of the way, it will snap.
And then your gonna be out 200 bones!!

Make sure your car is also has rollpins installed
in the oil passages that conect the block to the
head. And buy as very high quality gasket.

Taking the timing chain off has always been the
hardest part of the job for me. I once managed to
drop the chain down into the oil pan:rolleyes:
Old hangers put on before breaking the special link
are a God-send.

Good luck, and have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Keven said:
The Owners Bible is a decent book. Just ignore
the advice of using Champion plugs:D
Use Lodge.
Good luck, and have fun.
Thx Keven!
Gotcha...

I'm going to buy my head gasket from internation-auto, is that a good one? Or any other source?

Thank you. :)
 

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Head gasket replacement is relatively easy and quick in a home garage.

The Brooklands book is a pretty good manual. Autobooks is another.

Recommendations:

Drain all fluids and remove the head bolts several days ahead of removal. Squirt a penetrating oil down the headbolt holes in the head several times a day for several days. This may help a head with corroded bolts come off easier.


Potential Problems:

1. Head sticks on block. For this you may need a simple hoist or fabricate a head puller tool like the Alfa original tool. DO NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES USE ANY TYPE OF PRYBAR BETWEEN THE HEAD AND THE BLOCK. The surfaces are aluminum and will damage easily.

2. Don't lose the timing chain down the engine. Attach mechanics wire to each end. Stuff a towel down in the well while your taking the timing chain link out. You don't want to accidently drop that down the engine either.

3. Set the engine at correct "time" before disassembly and reassemble in same way.

4. Have a machine shop check the head for trueness. Resurface only the minimum amount if needed. While the head is off you might as well have the machine shop check the valves and install new seals.

5. Do not lift the head by the camshafts or camshaft journals. The studs in the camshaft journals have been known to pull out when abused like that.

6. Be VERY careful when cleaning the mating surfaces. DO NOT use a scraper that could gouge the aluminum.

7. After complete reassembly, TRIPLE check the valve timing. Leave the spark plugs out and SLOWLY and GENTLY rotate the engine by hand to ensure that the valves are clear and that the engine is timed correctly.
 

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Headgaskets

Hey Alfa Chan:

Paul Spruell has carbon fiber head gaskets for a little added durability. Orion Motor sports have copper head gaskets for around $50.

I agree with RT that its not too bad and can be done with ease @ home. His outline is a good list of common pitfalls to avoid. Your biggest pain will be getting the ancillary items off (T/A, fuel lines, headers, etc). Takes a friend to easily get that head off. Bring her up level or you will hang on the studs. Place her down level as well in reassembly.

And by all means, follow the correct pattern and instructions for retorquing the head.

John M
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
brain surgery...

Thank you everybody for the advice.


Anyone has a picture of the tool that Roadtrip mentioned? And where does it connect to the head?
The "Bible" mentioned about a special tool, but it doesn't say anything else.

The head stick to the block is what I fear the most too.

Any recommendation on how to check the TDC? And how to move it?
Put it in gear and move the car?

Thank you :D
 

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Roadtrip said:

2. Don't lose the timing chain down the engine. Attach mechanics wire to each end. Stuff a towel down in the well while your taking the timing chain link out. You don't want to accidently drop that down the engine either.

Keven also mentioned this and I've seen it referenced in quite a few repair manuals. Actually, the first thing I do is drop both ends of the chain into the engine to get the dam things the hell out of the way!!! Just use a telescoping mechanics magnet to get em out. Makes my life way easier.

I've learned the hard way that scraping the carbon off the pistons and blowing it off with compressed air WILL result in an engine that smokes like a bastard (technical term). Seems the tiny bits of carbon will get lodged between the rings and lands and sieze the rings. Resist the temptation.

A little detail item (well, there's a few of them) I always do is to clean the studs and the holes in the head thru which they pass. This eliminates the crap that caused the head to stick in the first place from falling onto your new head gasket. I use a die on the head studs and a tap in the head nuts to clean the threads. Then clean the head nut washers. After the head is lowered into place, I put a couple drops of oil on the head where each of the 8 thick washers go. Install the washers with the tapered (or rounded) side up followed by more oil on the top of each stud so it runs down the threads and onto the washer. The same technique applies to the engine lifting hook, which goes on the center pair of studs, with it's two, thin un-tapered washers. Avoid getting any oil in the head nuts as this will cause hydraulic lock and throw the torque accuracy right out the window.

After the usual cold/hot torque sequence, I retorque the cold engine to the hot spec after loosening the nuts, ONE at a time, a quarter turn or so. Retorqueing every 2 or 3 oil changes will guaranty the head gasket out lasting the oil rings or valve guides.
 

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Papajam-
Do you actually oil the head stud threads? I though that the torque specs assumed dry threads. Oiled threads will result in considerably more tension on the stud than was intended.

Also, do you recommend using anti-sieze compound on the stud holes in the head?
 

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Roadtrip said:
Papajam-
Do you actually oil the head stud threads? I though that the torque specs assumed dry threads. Oiled threads will result in considerably more tension on the stud than was intended.

Also, do you recommend using anti-sieze compound on the stud holes in the head?
Yes. Oiling the threads WILL result in more tension. That's the whole idea. Alfa refers to the technique in their shop manuals as "lubetorque". I think that NOT oiling the threads is the number 1 reason for premature headgasket failures. The goal is to measure the clamping force on the gasket and not the friction of dry threads.

Personally, I don't anti-sieze the studs but I know of others who do. Your choice.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
papajam said:
Yes. Oiling the threads WILL result in more tension. That's the whole idea. Alfa refers to the technique in their shop manuals as "lubetorque". I think that NOT oiling the threads is the number 1 reason for premature headgasket failures. The goal is to measure the clamping force on the gasket and not the friction of dry threads.

Personally, I don't anti-sieze the studs but I know of others who do. Your choice.
What kind of anti-sieze should I use? WD-40? Or something else?
Thx. :)
 

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I use Permatex anti-seize on any fastener/component that has the potential to rust in place. Suspension fasteners, exhaust hardware, spark plugs, etc. Even use it on urethane bushings to stop the squeaking. Comes in a little plastic jar with a built-in applicator brush. Should be available at any auto parts store.
The head stud threads get good 'ol Castrol GTX.
 
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