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Discussion Starter #1
Into week three of staying home, I wish I could say I've fixed everything wrong with my car. Unfortunately, at least until very recently, my job has consumed the majority of my waking hours (I'm a communications director for a large public health agency).

My list is short:
  1. Get the engine tuned. It's running pretty rough. Maybe timing? Maybe something else.
  2. Drop the front end. I'm planning to do this the right way, counting splines and rotating the bar. Going for a 1.25-1.5" drop.
  3. Various interior projects. COurtesy lights, gauge lights, wiring looms and conduit.
  4. Maybe I'll finally get the AC working correctly.
What have you all got lined up? Stay safe! Stay home!
 

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Well - pretty much in the same boat (I work in a job that enables remote working and learning...been busy). Luckily my GTV6 is pretty well sorted. So I'll be spending time building an engine for my 74 GTV restoration. It will be my first complete engine build...so going slow and carefully.

Good luck with your GTV6 projects!
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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Well, I wish I'd waited a month to rebuild my d-mn Burman steering box! ?
 

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I'm getting my Alfetta ('76 GT) more roadworthy. First on the chopping block is essentially the whole rear brake system; calipers, hard lines, discs. After I have all of that taken car of, I need to make new mounts for my sway bar, putting a later 22" one in. After that I can put the CV axles in that I rebuilt a little while ago, and hopefully put the car back on the ground. Up front I have a small rust spot in the frame rail that I should probably fix up and I have to put front rotors on the car and finish routing brake lines. I also have to get new hard line for the clutch system, there was the tiniest pinhole about 2 or 3 inches away from the soft line to the slave cylinder. After all that is done, all I have left to do is the body, which is definitely rough since it's been sitting for 40 years, but the Ziebart rust protection that's been on the car since '76 has been working fantastically.
 

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Joe Elwell
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Rebuilding 3 liter for my GTV6 that I picked from a Milano last year. Have block, pistons, liners, heads, valves, etc etc almost ready to take to machine shop.

But alas, have only found time during the week to take the GTV6 for the occasional spin.

Good news is that traffic is so much thinner that those drives are a lot more fun!!
 

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I am still fixing customer cars all week (auto repair is considered "essential"), so not much additional time for my own projects.

But, I do need to adjust the valves on the GTV6 (still my daily driver) and attempt one last re-seal of the Busso timing belt tensioner before throwing in the towel and installing the Staybelt mechanical tensioner that I have on the shelf.

And maybe detail the **** thing, paint is quite faded!
 

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attempt one last re-seal of the Busso timing belt tensioner before throwing in the towel and installing the Staybelt mechanical tensioner that I have on the shelf.
Interested to hear what you thing of the Staybelt. I'll need to do a tensioner next time I do my belt.
 

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cda951
Re: the hydraulic tensioner
One thing to try if you haven't already is to seal the outside of the piston oil seal . The piston shaft seals often leak past the outside of the seal and the cylinder wall , I used a gray sealant on mine and finally stop the leak peoperly.
post reply #38 has some photos and information.
 

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Stay extra safe everyone! You don’t want to get hurt working on your car these days!

I’m continuing the resto of the alfetta in “A New Hope”. Have now transitioned to inventorying and cleaning parts, and the all-important list of stuff I need, followed by the inevitable “I need to spend HOW much?”, and the follow-on justification plans to the wife/CFO.

one more thing I’ve learned... car mechanics already know how to wash our hands. After a full day in a greasy, oily engine tear-down, if you can clean those hands in ONLY 20 seconds, you are a superstar!
 

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cda951
Re: the hydraulic tensioner
One thing to try if you haven't already is to seal the outside of the piston oil seal . The piston shaft seals often leak past the outside of the seal and the cylinder wall , I used a gray sealant on mine and finally stop the leak peoperly.
post reply #38 has some photos and information.
Hi Glen,

Thanks for the link. When I first dragged my '81 out of the salvage yard a few years ago, it had the original de-tensioner locked into the tightest setting, and some epoxy and a pipe plug stuffed into the oil feed and return passages, respectively. I opened the passages back up and rebuilt a de-tensioner using the best parts of two different used units. I used the piston shaft with less scoring, but it always seemed that the leak was from between the shaft and the inner lip seal. I did use some RTV on the outside of the seal during the subsequent attempt to fix the oil leak, and it helped a bit, though I did not have time to let it cure for 24 hrs. The leak is not huge, but still annoying.

I'll give it another go, because the de-tensioner idea actually works quite well. I'm sure a number of you have seen this, but since many seem to have extra time on their hands, have a read of Busso's original patent for the de-tensioner, it is quite interesting:

 

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Ive spent the last 2 weeks+ in the garage, organizing & throwing stuff out. (FWIW, bunch of extra ss GTV trim will be posted from a 65 I sold off to Australia a year ago) I finally hung an electric winch and both extension cord reels and am tackling "the list" on cars now.

The 67 Super build is progressing, car is in paint and getting attn with the slow down. Engine being built, head & carbs are finished and all the parts are sorted and in one place on the shelf. Prob should figure out interior and get ready for upholstery guy next, but not critical.

73 Berlina sub & amp wiring is almost done, big brake kit is next. Installed new visors today and spent way too long taking apart and cleaning the grab handles and b pillar switches. Sometimes the stupidest things take the longest, but hey, got 4 more weeks of this...should be productive

Btw. Ant Amstead is in the same boat, albeit with much better tools. (the Motortrend app has been paying for itself lately ) Spent 2 hours watching him organize his garage, or at least talk about it n his cars. His Alfa build was cool to watch. If you havent seen it, look it up under "Master Mechanic"

Stay safe n Healthy, cheers
 

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Essential worker, although they gave people the chance to go home with pay. Those of us left are doing almost twice as much work.
But...I did get the euro airbox installed on the spider. My wife feels it improved the car. (Sound-wise) I also prefer more go than show.

Still need to replace the spider fuel pump with the new Facet one.
Other projects are prepping a 1983 BMW 320is for sale, and rebuilding the motor for a 1972 BMW 2002tii. Of course I am laser-focused on getting those jobs done...I just started stripping a door for the 2002, now doing metal bumping. Oh, and old house restoration, and I still gotta tow another project car home, and...

Little victories give satisfaction.
1619644
1619645
 

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Not much of any consequence here. My next project WAS to take a set of Euro ALFA 146 16" Teledial rims into the machine shop to have the rear side of the center bores opened up a bit. Those are going on my GTV6 project car. Rims are FWD, so hub-centric. RWD hubs are stud-centric. With the lockdown, I guess that will have to wait until this has blown over. Then sandblasting and powder coating to have them ready for fresh rubber. All that's on hold for the moment.

In the meantime, just puttering on sanding and painting small detail parts. And selling a few parts from my organ donor GTV6s. My extra slow project just became slower still.
 

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Not much of any consequence here. My next project WAS to take a set of Euro ALFA 146 16" Teledial rims into the machine shop to have the rear side of the center bores opened up a bit. Those are going on my GTV6 project car. Rims are FWD, so hub-centric. RWD hubs are stud-centric. With the lockdown,
I am pretty sure the original Campagnolo wheels on my '81 GTV6 are hub-centric. I was having issues getting them balanced properly as the magnesium was corroded around the center bore where the emblem goes, but the wheel still centered nicely on the hub.

Are some GTV6 wheels not hub-centric?
 

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From what I learned from others with more experience on this topic, GTV6 (RWD) rims are centered on the hub by the 5 studs. The FWD alloys have a snugger fit where the center bore meets the very center of the hub. This difference on the wheels is only an issue on the backside of the rim at the center bore. It doesn't factor in on the badge side. So only a little tweak on that hole can allow the rims to snug the rims down tight with no daylight between the two. In fact, I had a chat with a gentleman in the midwest who had used these same style rims on his GTV6. He told me he had fixed the mild interference problem with a hand file... so the metal removed is not much. I think I had my machinist open the bore about 5mm on the diameter, and about 10mm deep. To test my first modified rim, I smeared a thin layer of modeling clay in that area and then snugged down the nuts. When I removed the rim, the clay was squished flat down to a zero thickness on that entire flat plateau around the center bore, telling me we were good.

My first test rim worked out from the dimensional guesses made. But when I bring the other 4 in, I'll bring along a front hub assembly. There is a bit more interference up front (vs the rear hubs) with the grease cap, etc. Any milling at the center of the rim that may be a little out-of-round shouldn't have a detectable effect on the rim's balance. If material were being removed near the perimeter, messing with the rim's balance would require a bit more finessing... or so logic tells me.

Altho my GTV6 project car is creeping along at a snail's pace, I guess someone up there wants it to happen. There has been more than one crazy coincidence that has greased the skids on advancing. Getting these rims was one of them. I had been supplying a friend in Ireland with parts needed to finish his US spec GTV6. He was appreciative that I was able to help on most of the bits on his list, so he asked if there were any ALFA parts I might want from Europe. I tentatively mentioned that I was sweet on phone dial rims on A-R 147 and 156 models that we never saw over here. But added that the shipping to the US would certainly scotch that idea. Hits reply was that he had a friend down the road with a scrapyard, and had a great selection in 15", 16", and 17". He would be happy to scout the collection to ID 4 or 5 of the best examples for me. Great--- except for the shipping cost. Within a week, another friend here had mentioned over lunch that he had just accepted a design consultancy job that would have him visiting Dublin every 3 months for meetings! So the questions was posed on him bringing GTV6 parts going east, and returning with one rim per trip over time. For a nice meal on each end of each trip, he offered to be our 'smuggling agent'! I now have all 5 rims--- Ta Da!

God was also involved in a wild chance sourcing of custom-made headers and modified intake plenum for my planned transplant of a 3.0 24v 4 cam V6 from an ALFA 164Q engine into a GTV6! This time from a gentleman in Bulgaria who had recently completed that conversion for a client. His client soon decided he now wanted a monster 3.7 version of that engine in his GTV6 instead. So... the goodies from the 3.0 engine were then seen as too restrictive for the 3.7. I was offered the slightly used headers and intake for a very fair price. Proving, once again, that someone upstairs wants my project to happen!

Peter
 

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finished some remodel work, and now spending most of my time working on my lloyd(as seen in the engine swaps) for those not in the know its more milano than lloyd, ...if it wernt for the lock down the 3.7 would be off to the machinist for re-balancing

if shipping wasnt slow as mollasses right now id have ordered up a center bearing for my "leftover" balloco and do some tuneing, but the lloyd will keep me plenty busy
 

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What year is your Lloyd? I remember those from the late '50s/ early 60s. A couple around town when I was a kid. Those showed up when Euro cars were introduced in the US, and a bunch of marques had to go thru the American taste test to see who lived and who did not make the cut. Beetles, Renault Dauphines, SAAB 94s, Borgwards, Lloyds, BMW Isettas, Messersmitts, Austins, Morris, and a ton of others. Love to see a pic of yours.
 
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