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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just picked up an issue of Sports Car Market with the pocket price guide.:(

Under the explanation for "Investment Grade" A - F the "F" explanation is written as follows:

"F Grade - Cars with few if any reedeming characteristics, that are consequently hopeless in nearly every way. Examples include the Alfa Romeo Alfetta sedan, the ISO Lele and the Lotus Eclat" :eek:

Jeez, I can think of a lot worse cars for the money Alfettas bring home. The bashing continues in the car market. This guide also had a D Grade example as an Alfa 2600 Sprint. I think I'm a little offended :mad:

These cars kick ***
 

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Sports Car Market (whatever that is) have no Fukin idea what they're talking about.
I can think of a lot worse cars for a lot MORE money than the Alfetta Sedan.
 

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Keith Martin, "the publisher", is in fact also the one who started the magazine. Some of you will find it curious, but what is today "Sports Car Market" started out as "The Alfa Romeo Market Letter". The original publication consisted of 4 newspaper quality pages, mimeographed, and was just as expensive in the early '90s as the current magazine is today. Keith attended the '93 Alfa National Convention in Baltimore, and taped some of our cars for his "Alfa Spotter's Video".

SCM was always brutal when it came to evaluating our Alfas, albeit they always seemed to be well-informed. At least, as much as I didn't like what I was reading, I couldn't argue that it wasn't a valid view. As the years have gone by however, and people have been added, I have seen write-ups where I can tell that the writer never lived through the period, or doesn't really know the Alfa subject in depth. Regardless, what makes a car collectible is a sizeable number of people willing to pay real money for it. Unfortunately, most of our Alfas are not (yet :)) in that category.

Best regards,
 

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It's funny to me how people "In the know" bash the sedans, and the general public doesn't know what they are, yet almost every time I drive mine, people take pictures, give me thumbs up, yell out "nice Alfa!", or ask me "what is it - I really like it" (even a couple of homeboyz in Oakland, with baggy pants around their knees have asked about it). For every one comment I get on my Sprint Veloce, I get about 15 on the sedan. It's crazy, truly the Rodney Dangerfield of cars in the auto press.
 

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I don't know about anyone else but the more I hear about how worthless the sedans are the more I want one. I bought my '76 Alfetta in '79 with 17K miles on it. I eventually sold it to my brother so I could buy a new '82 GTV6.

The car is on blocks at his son's house. I think I'm going to rent a trailer and get it back this summer.
 

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Jeez, I can think of a lot worse cars for the money Alfettas bring home. The bashing continues in the car market. This guide also had a D Grade example as an Alfa 2600 Sprint. I think I'm a little offended :mad:
Guys, I think you are misunderstanding things a bit here - SCM is not rating these cars as drivers; rather as investments. It's a bit cruel, but probably pretty accurate. The fact is, these cars probably do have a few years to go before they appreciate much at all.

At this point in time, a 2600 Sprint (grade D) is a lot better investment than an Alfetta Sedan (grade F).

Joe
 

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It's where Berlinas and Giulia sedans used to be. Rejoice, I say. An F rating means they'll continue to be affordable. Giuliettas have gone through the roof, Giulias are pretty much there (there's a $55,000 Giulia Super at Cars Dawydiak in SF), and Berlinas are almost there.

I personally do not think Alfettas will ever reach the same value because (1) most are gone, (2) 70s build quality and build style (lots of rivets where a 105 car would have screws) does not lend itself to long life and ease or restoration, and (3) transaxle cars are in my view, and apparently others, harder to own and maintain. Driveshaft and transaxle worries put a lot of people off these cars, not to mention shift quality. Granted many are not to the standard they should be, or to the standard they were when they were new, but I think that's the reality.

Recall in all this that SCM is largely a market-based magazine, in spite of its stated enthusiast focus, and so it looks at value and appreciation potential as much as driving fun. And it's focused on the US market, which relatively speaking, got hardly any Alfettas at all compared to Europe and Australia. 1975-1979 only, and there couldn't have been more than a couple thousand a year, most of them Alfetta GTs and Sprints, I'll bet. And all of these were smog-era cars with cats, air pumps, retarded dual-point distributors, and all the other hallmarks of that less-than-stellar era for cars.

Andrew
 

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Another thought: in Calif at least, all Alfettas except 1975s still have to meet bienneal smog checks (slated to go to annual this year I believe), which means they can't be modified much, and failing a smog check is often the death knell for a marginally operable/economical to operate car.

Andrew
 

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Guys, I think you are misunderstanding things a bit here - SCM is not rating these cars as drivers; rather as investments. It's a bit cruel, but probably pretty accurate. The fact is, these cars probably do have a few years to go before they appreciate much at all.

At this point in time, a 2600 Sprint (grade D) is a lot better investment than an Alfetta Sedan (grade F).

Joe
There's no misunderstanding here.
The Sedans were said to have "...few if any redeeming characteristics...hopeless in nearly every way..."
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I agree that even though the guide is from an "investment" point of view, it really insinuates that they are pieces of crap "investment" wise and otherwise.

A lot of good points were made as to why they aren't sought after by collectors. Smog issue and build quality being the biggest. But there are a lot of good "reedeming qualities" these cars have that the collector car market just doesn't seem to care about. What other light weight sedans of the 70's with near 50/50 weight dist., had aluminum double overhead camshaft motors with transaxles and inboard disc brakes?

It's true that transaxles are harder to maintain, and if you go and read some reviews of Alfas with this setup from SCM, this set up gets bashed along the "few advantages" that inboard disc brakes supposedly provide. The funny thing is that if you mention "Transaxle" cars today, isn't that synonimous with the likes of Corvettes and other cars with high end engineering?:confused:
The fact that there are far few sedans on the road than Guilas, GTV's etc.. would make these cars RARE and hard to find. I say in 2020 these cars will be worth their weight in gold:p:D

 

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I had a 79 Sport Sedan 10 years ago, and enjoyed it, but always liked driving my Berlina better. Had the best brakes of any Alfa I've driven, and the handling was definitely better and flatter than the Berlina. But overall I didn't like it more. That's all subjective though.

Andrew
 

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And on the subject of subjective...I'll do you one better: I'm partial to the series 1 sedans myself :). The larger sport sedans with their brown vinyl interiors, and messy gauge clusters hold little interest to me (other than a source for mechanical parts, since nothing else is swappable). Plus, windwings rock - and they're only found on the series 1 sedans.:D
 

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Oh I agree completely re the styling of the early v late Alfetta sedans. I only bought the one I did because it was sitting forlorn at the curb in my neighborhood, out of registration, and I got it for $175 plus an old camera.

I'm happy to be wrong as to the eventual general acknowledgment of the greatness of Alfettas. I would not have guessed 15 years ago that Berlinas could go for $16,000, but they are. And Giulias for $55,000? My crystal ball was never that clear. My first Giulia in 1977 was $400.

Andrew
 

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Brings up the old question...How many people buy Alfas for an investment? How many just like to drive them in spite of investment woes? IMHO I like to drive them and not make them garage queens.

I just picked up a running '75 Alfetta Sedan in Reno for $400 bucks. Plan is to take out the old ratty interior, take off the bumpers, put in a few race seats, roll bar, and head to the track, and pick up all the peices that fall off and put em back on.

We should thank the magazine for such a low rating, keeps the prices low for those of us who like to buy em cheap and enjoy them.
 

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I think it was more the wording of the SCM slam rather than the fact that they are crap investments. I have already given my "til death do us part" vows to my sedan, so I don't care about resale value at all. And while I didn't buy mine as an "investment" per se, it would be nice to know that even with a good classic car insurance policy; if someone were to rear-end me while chatting on their phone and eating a Big Mac, I wouldn't have an uphill battle trying to get a decent payout for the car.

On another note, this thread has again encouraged me to seriously think about putting together a North American Sedan Registry (tenatively - may go worldwide if the requests to do so come in:D). I have the spreadsheet done, if anyone wants to submit info/pics on their cars, please email me directly: [email protected]
No guarantee that I'll be able to put together a website or any other cool features, as Andrew has done with the Berlina Register. But I will try to create a database that will at least allow owners a networking source for parts, etc.
 

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I ran an Alfetta Sedan Register back when I had my Sport Sedan, which totaled like 15 cars. I passed it on to someone when I sold mine, and I don't know where it is now. Alas, I no longer have the spreadsheet. Is it maybe online somewhere?

Andrew
 

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I remember giving you my info back then, and you had just passed it along to the new keeper of the flame. AFAIK, it's somewhere in the ether. I've seen nothing since that time (1997ish??) anywhere online, and believe me, I've looked...
I have an OCD habit of printing ebay auctions, and other for sale ads that come up on Alfetta sedans. Mostly Series 1, but a few Sport Sedans as well. My thought was to compile what little info those provide and work from there?
 

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And on the subject of subjective...I'll do you one better: I'm partial to the series 1 sedans myself :). The larger sport sedans with their brown vinyl interiors, and messy gauge clusters hold little interest to me (other than a source for mechanical parts, since nothing else is swappable). Plus, windwings rock - and they're only found on the series 1 sedans.:D
100% agree. I had a second series Sedan that was great to drive but it always seemed, well, so '70s (I absolutely HATED the brown interior trim and ill-fitting glovebox door). The Series 1 car still has a bit of vintage flair to it which makes it just a bit more special to my eyes.

Regarding value, I think we should take the good with the bad. The cars are ridiculously cheap, even for a good runner. I have also been hoarding all NOS parts that come up on eBay because there is so little interest in them. Just recently I purchased a set of NOS series 1 door handles and trunk lock still in the original Alfa bag with matched keys for $22 including shipping. Despite the poor investment potential I have still budgeted around $10K to restore it to a decent standard. It sbould be the coolest $10,000 car on the planet.
 
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