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Steve what I would try is put 12v straight from battery to the blue wire connector (I think that is the fast speed connector?) on the housing [make sure ign. is off] then twiggle the fan with your finger thru the flap....it might just start up! Mine did!...............I got mine started this way....then stopped the motor and injected loads of WD40 thru the flap between housing and the fan so it collects at the base of the housing where the motor sits, and let it run again for 20 minutes, just from the battery.....so far still running strong!

Of course the ground wire tucked up under the passenger footwell has to be good too;)
 

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Steve what I would try is put 12v straight from battery to the blue wire connector (I think that is the fast speed connector?) on the housing [make sure ign. is off] then twiggle the fan with your finger thru the flap....it might just start up! Mine did!...............I got mine started this way....then stopped the motor and injected loads of WD40 thru the flap between housing and the fan so it collects at the base of the housing where the motor sits, and let it run again for 20 minutes, just from the battery.....so far still running strong!

Of course the ground wire tucked up under the passenger footwell has to be good too;)
Thanks spiderserie4, I tried this with no luck. I would have been very happy if the fan started and pinched my finger, but alas, no luck.

First I confirmed that there was 12 volts at the motor connection with the ignition on and the fan switch on. That test returned "true". I also tested the ground connection (which is tough to get to). Then I turned off the ignition and supplied 12 volts directly to the blower motor wires, again no joy. I even tried banging on the housing hoping that maybe I would free up a stuck brush, but again no luck.

My fan turns very freely, so I've got to assume that the brushes or brush springs are the problem.

Thanks for the suggestion !!
 

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Thanks for the useful info. Yesterday, I removed the whole heater unit from RHD 1975 GT Junior. Splitting the bottom section off helped me get it out without removing the glove box or centre console, but it was a battle. I will probably remove the console to make it easier to refit the fully assembled unit once I get the broken bits replaced. The motor was toasted, heater matrix a pile of rust and control valve leaky - which is why the previous owner had bypassed the whole thing. Thanks for the tip about drilling a couple of drain holes.
 

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Thanks to this thread I was able to replace my 1976 Spider's blower motor - without a dash-board-ectomy... And yes, I did drill weep holes in the bottom of the blower chamber!!
Cutting the sound insulation/carpet padding on the top of the transmission hump was necessary in order to get the new fan assembly in...
 

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More (!) thanks to this thread. I read this prior to tackling the (inoperative) cabin blower motor replacement job. I used my Power Probe to check the ground (good), then power the blue wire (still no fan). I stuck my finger in there and gave the fan a push (it pushed easily) and BINGO. It works now! I'm going to hot wire it ON for awhile, see how she does. VERY HAPPY ALFA OWNER RIGHT NOW.
Now on to the next project. Fix the broken, driver-seat, RF attaching pedestal, for the seat track. The weld broke at the floor. Looks like it needs to be welded from the top.
 

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Spent whole afternoon today trying to remove the heater as it was leaking.
No success so far.

First I removed the air hoses, then a one screw from the bottom part from passenger side. I failed at removing the ones at the back (near the firewall). I can't get there :(
I also failed to remove the front screw from driver's side - nut moves together with the screw.

I then tried to remove the whole unit. I removed top screws from passenger side, disconnected valve from the driver's and stuck there.

I need to remove copper tube from passenger side and top screw of the whole unit on the driver's side.

It's like going through hell. What's worse, I can't drive right now with disconnected tubes and I'm not sure if and when I'll reassembly everything. ;)
 

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I feel your pain. My left front nut was seized to the screw. Had to cut the screw in half with an oscillating tool in-situ.
 

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What about the 4 (or 5) spring clips that hold the top part of the heater box to the middle section. The 2 at the back are up against the bulkhead, getting to those is easier if the whole heater box is loose/unattached on the bulkhead - 4 nuts and large diameter washers on studs hold the top part to the bulkhead

The 2 (or 3) spring clips at the front are easier, but that depends on your console

With the clips removed I found it possible to first slide out the bottom+middle section and then remove the top section. Sliding out the bottom+middle section is easier if the top section is firmly attached to the bulkhead.

On my RHD coupe with standing pedals, I slid it out towards the passenger side footwell. I understand spiders are generally more difficult.

Good luck
 

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What's worse, I can't drive right now with disconnected tubes and I'm not sure if and when I'll reassembly everything. ;)
you should be able to bypass the heater by joining a length of hose from the small waterpump outlet to the heater hose connection on top of the plenum. (tie the original WP hose out of the way, safe)

thats what I did when my heater dumped hot coolant on my feet whilst out on a drive:)
I carry a 4 ft length of heater hose now in the trunk!
 
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you should be able to bypass the heater by joining a length of hose from the small waterpump outlet to the heater hose connection on top of the plenum. (tie the original WP hose out of the way, safe)

thats what I did when my heater dumped hot coolant on my feet whilst out on a drive:)
I carry a 4 ft length of heater hose now in the trunk!
Thanks for the tip! I need some more specific directions though - you mean inside the bonnet, between the engine and firewall?
Or just connect the tubes from left and right side of the heater, inside the car?
 

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this is how I did it on my S4. Dont make it so short that it kinks (hence the 4 foot length, maybe 3 ft. would do it too)
(Photo is an S3, just for illustration purposes..a rhd conversion by the looks of things)
 

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Done. I removed entire heater. I didn't removed dash. First I removed valve from the left (driver) side, which helped with top screws. So proud of myself! ;)

My unit already has small hole in the bottom - no need for drill ;) However, as I have no AC, I wonder what that's for? Especially if it's just a hole, water would be dripping to the carpet.

I took the unit to the local garage, they said it's tight, not leaking. I think that maybe it was just clogged with oil and stuff - I had a serious leaking problems with engine, repaired last winter.

Few pictures attached.

As I am not sure if I will be able to connect everything right (heater, central console wires, etc.) I'd be obliged for any photos how it should look like ;) I took a few pictures myself, but I'm afraid not enough :D
 

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@kbartosiak That looks like an awful lot of crud in your heater box. Are your cowl drains clogged? I would check and fix that now! While it is apart, I would check the operation of the cabin fan. Usually you can easily remove it from the lower case half and inspect the brushes and lube the bearings. Then, test for proper operation using jumper wires to a 12v power source. Lots of other Maintenance and Repair that can be done more easily with the console and h-box removed. Have fun!
 

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@kbartosiak That looks like an awful lot of crud in your heater box. Are your cowl drains clogged? I would check and fix that now! While it is apart, I would check the operation of the cabin fan. Usually you can easily remove it from the lower case half and inspect the brushes and lube the bearings. Then, test for proper operation using jumper wires to a 12v power source. Lots of other Maintenance and Repair that can be done more easily with the console and h-box removed. Have fun!
Drains cleaned, motor working.
Right now working on reconnecting the wires - e.g. grounding was connected instead one of the fan speeds, and (after my work >:)) indicator worked only with doors open ;)
Should be back on the road later today though :)
 

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The heater fan in our '84 Spider started to squeek and eventually it stopped working. I could turn the fan by reaching in the bottom of the unit but it didn't spin easily so I knew it was time to service or replace the fan motor.

I had removed the whole heater unit a while back which included removing the dash board. While that is not as hard a job as it may sound I had read that some have been able to unbolt the bottom half of the heater unit (which houses the fan & motor) without removing the whole unit. I had my doubts but decided to give it a go. It still took some struggling and cursing but I did it!

I took some new pictures to add to those I took way back when.

If anyone wants/needs to do this, here's some info that may help.

First I removed the center console and the side panels. Four screws, a bunch of electrical connectors, undoing the heater control levers and removing the shift knob gets the center console out. A small nut at the rear plus clips near the floor gets the side panels out.

The cable that controls air flow (off/floor/windscreen) attaches to the ****pit side of the heater unit. With the center console & side panels out it can be easily accessed. Loosen the screw holding the cable to the heater and unhook the end of the cable from the arm of the air flow flap.

On each side of the heater are plastic ducts to direct air up to the windscreen. A pair of hex head screws secure those ducts to the unit. Remove those screws and the ducts can be moved out of the way.

There are two wires on the left underside of the heater - low speed and high speed. Un-hook those (yellow and yellow w/ black trace IIRC). The ground wire (black) exits the front of the heater (closest to the firewall) and grounds to a screw way up under the dash to the right side of the heater. Remove that, too.

The bottom half of the heater unit is bolted to the upper half with four bolts. The heads of these bolts are inside the upper half and inaccessable. The good news is the heads fit into a hex shaped recess in the upper half so, if you carefully remove the nuts & washers the lower half should be removable leaving the rest of the heater in place. This is where I had some doubts but decided to try.

The bolts hang down and must be pushed upwards enough allow the bottom half to move sideways. Don't push the bolts up too far because if they get out of position they may be difficult (or impossible) to get them back into place without removing the whole unit. I moved the carpet directly underneath the heater out from underneath so that the lower half could move down a fraction of an inch. It was still a snug fit but I was able to squeeze the lower half with the fan & motor out towards the right side.

Once I had the lower half out it was obvious there had been some water in the bottom of the unit allowing the bearing to rust & seize. (I bought a 'good used' fan motor on eBay to replace the old one.)

I decided to drill a couple of drain holes in the very bottom of the lower half so any future water will have a way to get out. The picture below also shows the resistor that allows two speed operation (direct 12V = high speed, 12V + resistor = low speed). My estimation is that there is plenty of clearance between that resistor and the inside of the housing to carefully drill a drain hole or two without taking the unit apart. I'd suggest a 1/8" dia drill bit and drill only enough to go though the thickness of the plastic housing - say 1/8" to 1/4". (a piece of masking tape around the drill bit as a depth flag would work fine) Obviously with the lower half on my work bench and the motor removed, it was easy to drill these holes.

Assembly, as they say, is the reverse of the above. Of those four bolts holding the two halves together, the front two (nearest the firewall) will be re-installed by feel only - no way you can see what you are doing. What I did was stuff a piece of paper towel inside a socket to keep th enut at the end of the socket. Then I used a piece of masking tape wrapped around trhe socket to hold the washers on top of the socket. Thusly, I was able to maneuver the washers & nut into place and catch the bolt.
Do you think the same applies (removal in situ of lower half) to a '77 Spider? Do the later models have a slightly different heater box?
 

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I like an earlier posters description "they built the car around the heater". The heater assembly is sitting on a shelf in the garage, too fussy for me, and I am not sure if my old body is up to the task. Here in Buffalo, NY I just don't take her out when it's too cold, unless I'm really itchin for a ride. Our spider is always garaged and never sees road salt.
 

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Thanks ghnl! Not sure what would have been worse, the pain of pulling the dash or living with a noisy albeit working blower. Your tip on pulling the lower part of the heater box in situ worked a treat! Blower motor looks to be serviciable so that is a bonus.
 

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Thanks ghnl. I used his description above to fix the fan blower on my 1971 Spider Veloce. The heater core valve had developed a leak and unbeknownst to me, the water had puddled in the bottom of the heater unit and seized the fan motor. I had not used the heater in quite a while and then one day, when I tried it, it didn't work. Thankfully, after searching thru this forum, I found this "water in the fan motor housing" diagnosis and began investigating.
I've always hated working on/under the dash on my Alfa. Getting everything lined up was always a chore. ghnl's decription worked out well for me and I was able to take most of his idea and use them to fix the problem.

I just removed the side panels from the center console. I did not have to remove the center piece with the shifter, nor did I have to disconnect any of the electrical wiring connectors. Only the 5 wires coming from the motor housing were what I disconnected. I was able to reach the four bolts holding the bottom of the heater unit using a combination of small ratchets and sockets. Yes, you cannot see the two next to the fire wall, but you can feel them and get to them with a small enough socket and wrench. I also had to use a utility blade to cut away the carpet and foam padding under the heater unit to give me enough room to maneuver the bottom of the heater unit from below the four bolts holding it in place. I cut the carpet and padding and folded it over itself so I could fold it back in place once I got the heater unit back in place.

Once I got the fan blower out, it was obviously a water issue. Fortunately, it wasn't completely rusted nor seized. The fan did turn, although it was quite stiff. I removed the two nuts holding the two motor halves together and used a screw driver and gentle hammer taps to separate the two halves. Then I use WD-40 and electrical contact cleaner to clean everything inside the motor housing--brushes, contacts, brush springs, coils, etc., with a rag and cue tips. I cleaned it up as best as I could and I also put some new grease in the areas where I cleaned out the old grease. I put it all back together and did a bench test using the car's batter and whoa la, fan spun at both speeds and sounded smooth. I drilled 4 holes in the bottom of the housing for any future water incursions and then I started putting it all back together.

My biggest challenge were those fours bolts which held the heater base unit in place. They spun too easily and any slight push when trying to line up all the bolts would make the bolts move up into the upper housing. When I could get the lower housing unit in place with all four bolts showing thru their respective holes, I could not get the nuts and washers on due to the bolts spinning or pushing up. I could not get them to sit into their hex housing as ghnl mentions he was able to do in his unit. After some curse choice words, I decided to use a little clear epoxy and dab some on each of the bolts hoping it would make them adhere to the holes they were going thru. After setting for about 15 min, I was having some luck. They were getting stiffer, but since I didn't want to wait much longer for the epoxy to dry, I also used some slivers of wood from a toothpick, and strategically shoved the slivers between the bolts and the holes they come out of. There was just enough space to wedge a small sliver of wood into the bolt holes along with the bolts to keep the bolts from spinning and also from being pushed back up into the upper housing. Between the epoxy and wood slivers, it held the bolts. I used very small amounts of epoxy so it could be overcome in the future if necessary.

Once all the little wood slivers were in, I was able to put on the washers and nuts and tighten them all up. I connected all the fan blower wires and did another test via the fan switch and all worked out perfectly. I folded the padding and carpet back into place and replaced the side panels. Fortunately, I did not have to purchase a new fan motor, but now I know I have a 15.3 cm fan motor in case I do have to do so in the future.

I've included a few photos of the process:

Untitled.jpg Untitled2.jpg Untitled3.jpg Untitled4.jpg Untitled5.jpg Untitled6.jpg Untitled7.jpg Untitled8.jpg
 
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