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I store my 88 Grad in a 60 ft x 50 ft 2 story barn. About twice a year the weather conditions are such that the inside of the barn is literally a cloud. I guess it has to do with the dewpoint, humidity, etc, but everything in the barn is dripping wet.

This happened to me over the weekend. There is salt on the roads so I didn't want to drive, but I couldn't stand the thought of letting the engine just sit there soaking wet, so I started it up and ran it to dry it off. I let it idle for a short while and then held the RPM around 2500 to get it up to temp quickly, and I ran it until the oil was hot using the pressure at idle to estimate when it was hot.

Does anybody have any better suggestions ? I have tried putting a dehumidifier near the car, but the volume of the barn is too large, and the dehumidifier tends to freeze up anyway. Likewise, I couldn't afford to try and heat that huge drafty barn.

Here is what I was up against (you may have to look at the image full size to see all the water):



 

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Got one of those and they work. But if you want to go cheap, this is what I do. 3 pieces of plywood(Cheap stuff) 20 X 20 Tarp. Place the boards down 12 X 8, placing one end of the tarp under the plywood on the 12 ft side. Drive car on the plywood, cover car with old blankets and wrap tarp around car. This should be done in the FALL when storing. Been doing this for years and I get no moisture. It all comes from the ground!
I've even done this and stored the car outside! I never start my cars until I'm ready to take them out in the Spring. I believe it's bad enough to start them in the Spring, but I believe you cause more damage starting them in the winter and not driving the car just to run it.
 

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I agree with alfasrule that a lot of moisture comes up out of the ground, and agree that if your barn floor is dirt, then parking on something impermeable (like plywood, or even sheet plastic) would help.

But, if the air is humid, then alfasrule's system isn't going to exclude that humidity. In fact, the tarp would trap it when the outside air dries out.

The permabag system is kind of pricey, but it does actively pump out the moisture. And creates a semi-sealed environment to slow the encroachment of humid air.

I believe you cause more damage starting them in the winter and not driving the car just to run it.
Yea, I'll go along with that. It sounds like SteveB2175 makes an effort to do more than just let his engine idle for 10 minutes. The biggest problem is the effect the moisture will have on the metal surfaces (exhaust, suspension, fuel tank, bodywork, ...). Just running the engine once a week doesn't address that.
 

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Things would get like that in New England over the winter a few times every year. I saved packets of Silica Gel and would stick them in plastic bags that I'd wrap around the hubs, rotors, etc. It helped.

People stick cell phones in Ziploc bags filled with rice to dry them out, you might get a 50 lb bag of rice and stick it in the car before you plastic wrap it. Or Silica Gel by the case.

Good luck with it,

bs
 
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