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Most of the grommets and seals in my car (1750gtv) are in good serviceable order but a bit faded and scruffy looking, as are many of the plastic surfaces. I believe (time will tell) I've found a reasonably good solution.

Use Vinyl spraypaint. I think it's because it seems to be self priming and is specifically designed for application on a highly flexible surface (Vinyl) that it works with the rubber .

I've used Plasti kote matt black and (so far) it adheres extremely well to the rubber. I suspect it also provide a sealing function as well.
The matt black is more 'semigloss' than flat so has a nice lustre, rather than a shiny appearance (it doesn't look like a chalkbord either)

I've found it also works on the plastic covers and surfaces like the hard underdash / glovebox area, the rearview mirror and the cover panels to the boot
It even worked on the wiring loom wrap. I rewrapped the damaged sections then sprayed the entire loom. Looks brand new.

Just make sure you clean the surface first (say with simple green) then air dry for several days.

Realistically I'm not producing a 'concours' car, just something that looks good that I can actually use. Time will tell, and worst case is that it'll peel off in short order, then I'll have to buy new parts (which I'd have had to do otherwise). If it fades/fails over a longer period then I'll respray.
 

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Great subject! You are doing what most of are trying to do, keep our cars in the best condition we can, with many parts super expensive or not available all the techniques we can share will help us all.

Thanks,

ncng


Most of the grommets and seals in my car (1750gtv) are in good serviceable order but a bit faded and scruffy looking, as are many of the plastic surfaces. I believe (time will tell) I've found a reasonably good solution.

Use Vinyl spraypaint. I think it's because it seems to be self priming and is specifically designed for application on a highly flexible surface (Vinyl) that it works with the rubber .

I've used Plasti kote matt black and (so far) it adheres extremely well to the rubber. I suspect it also provide a sealing function as well.
The matt black is more 'semigloss' than flat so has a nice lustre, rather than a shiny appearance (it doesn't look like a chalkbord either)

I've found it also works on the plastic covers and surfaces like the hard underdash / glovebox area, the rearview mirror and the cover panels to the boot
It even worked on the wiring loom wrap. I rewrapped the damaged sections then sprayed the entire loom. Looks brand new.

Just make sure you clean the surface first (say with simple green) then air dry for several days.

Realistically I'm not producing a 'concours' car, just something that looks good that I can actually use. Time will tell, and worst case is that it'll peel off in short order, then I'll have to buy new parts (which I'd have had to do otherwise). If it fades/fails over a longer period then I'll respray.
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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For rubber I have had absolutely amazing results with MG Chemicals Rubber Renue.

Rubber Cleaner

It'll strip paint so be careful with it, but it works great on rubber bits.
 

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Some of my seals are slightly torn but mostly in decent shape, and I was just wondering if rather than replace them (door seals = $200 per side, hatch seal $100) I could repair them? I've read about using Shoe Goo to repair torn boots and rubber bits, so would this be an approach?

Vote of confidence for using Plasticote for black plastic restoration. I've also found some threads on other boards describing how people have coated their wheels, then painted them. End result - new wheel color without damaging the stock finish. Just peel it off if you want another change or plan to sell! I imagine this would work for any number of trim pieces. I'm coating my dash, as the stuff is supposed to be extremely flexible, and should resist cracking and tearing. Some SEM shadow blue to finish and voila - brand new dash!
 

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Its a tough question, depending on the quality you are looking for. I just did the shopping cart for the rubber for my car, about $700 to do it all, whoo!

That does not include windsheild gasket or rear hatch gasket. But most the of the rest.

ncng

Some of my seals are slightly torn but mostly in decent shape, and I was just wondering if rather than replace them (door seals = $200 per side, hatch seal $100) I could repair them? I've read about using Shoe Goo to repair torn boots and rubber bits, so would this be an approach?

Vote of confidence for using Plasticote for black plastic restoration. I've also found some threads on other boards describing how people have coated their wheels, then painted them. End result - new wheel color without damaging the stock finish. Just peel it off if you want another change or plan to sell! I imagine this would work for any number of trim pieces. I'm coating my dash, as the stuff is supposed to be extremely flexible, and should resist cracking and tearing. Some SEM shadow blue to finish and voila - brand new dash!
 

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I just got a load of stuff from Chris at Highwood Alfa in the UK, including new window scrapers and channel, all around. I think I can fix the rips in the other seals though. Shoe Goo? And maybe some of the conditioner/cleaner listed above? If that doesn't work then I s'pose it's simple enough to just save up and place an order.

I do need to lift the windshield to fix a spot of rust. I hear it's possible to remove the glass without ruining the gasket. I hope so - that's $200+!
 
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