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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
jc96 and I have new acquisitions . . .



naw, ours is not the cream/blue and red examples above, but the 1/43 model just released . . .



Known as Romeo “Autotutto” (all purpose) this beyond-cute van was introduced by Alfa in 1954, built in the Pomigliano d’Arco factory 15 km north of Naples and available in many versions. The one with extra big windows was the “promiscuo” (promiscuous in English!). It sported a de-tuned 1290cc twin-cam engine producing 35 bhp; the higher performance version was used in the Giuletta Berlina.
(according to the “Romeo” Register, Alfa Romeo was state owned at this time and the Romeo found a ready market with the police, military and other government bodies, possibly as a result of political pressure to buy in-house and not to spend "real money")

The yellow/blue Romeo Autotutto-Cimbali model has special significance for me as it brings together two passions: Alfa Romeo and Cimbali (a brand of espresso machines). Cimbali had a fleet Autotuttos from 1954 on, painted bright yellow and blue, zipping around Italian towns, offering to passers-by a free cup of the “new espresso” also known as crema caffè. Cimbali coined their espresso “cimbalino” (the slogan was painted on the vans and also appeared on their machines: “Con La Cimbali... “un cimbalino”).

I’ll park my Cimbali Autotutto near my ’61 Cimbali ‘Rubino’ espresso machine, Chris has parked his on a shelf of "oddities" alongside his GTV.



It’s interesting to note that the Autotutto is front wheel drive, with ZF transaxle.



This factoid blew me away as I had always thought that the 164 was Alfa’s first FWD vehicle.

Are you listening hardcore (non 164) Alfisti?
 

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Pretty darn cute. Would be wild to have one.

"I had always thought that the 164 was Alfa’s first FWD vehicle".

Oh, you newcomers, lol.

The FWD Alfa Sud was introduced in 1972, and the 33 came out in 1983, IIRC. Both with a boxer flat four engine (think of the similar Subaru flat four) driving the front wheels. The Sud was considered to be maybe the company's most successful model, selling ~900,000 of the four door body version and ~121,000 of the Sprint Coupe version.

I got to test drive a hot Sud on a track in Scotland with an Alfa test driver in 75. Was great fun to toss it around. A friend of mine and I were driving the 1970 Junior Z we picked up in Glasgow to import to the US for a friend, and we came across an 'Alfa Days' celebration, the track open for test driving different Alfa models. Wouldn't let us drive the Montreal, though. Nuts. That Z is now restored and owned by 'braino', as described previously here on the BB.

The Sud and 33 would have been fun to have here officially. There are probably a certain number of them here in the US, judging by the BB boxer engine section, and clearly being old enough to import.
 

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Very interesting. Thank you for sharing

Sent from my SM-J730F using Tapatalk
 

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Fantastic...!
Particularly, the fantastic access to things like the starter, those top trans bolts, etc.
I’m almost tempted to cut a section of floor out of my GTV. Hmmm.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
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Oh, you newcomers, lol...
Yes, a babe in the woods am I (my first and only Alfa is 164). But it could be worse, next door neighbor bought a Stelvio and when when I came to visit (and parked the 164 next to it) he didn't even notice the car.
 

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"Yes, a babe in the woods am I (my first and only Alfa is 164)". Well, you are certainly appreciated.

"he didn't even notice the car".

Yup, common occurrence nowadays I have found. Don't even know what my cars are, let alone acknowledge them when on the road. Disappointing. For many, somewhat of a different set of Alfa owners, IMHO. They might as well be buying a BMW; however, glad they bought what they did.

No question, Alfa wrote us owners of 'not that old' Alfas off, as not relevant. Generally, only the owners/drivers of the very old "classic" Alfas are feted, and even many of them do not acknowledge our 164s. Oh, yes, there are a few who do, but they seem to be rare.
 

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I spoke to a young lady with a new Giulia, in the drive-thru line at Panera Bread Co. She said that everyone with an Alfa comes to talk with her and share their Alfa experiences. She said she feels like we are all family!

Mark
 
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