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Yesterday I literally risked my life with the 8C, wheels locked down on a major road while going approx 40-50 mph, was lucky that in that moment no car was coming in the opposite direction.

Couldn't get the car to move, even after putting it in Neutral and removing the parking brake...

2 State Police cars arrived immediately after I called 911 and were able to isolate the car and direct traffic, the officers were extremely nice and helpfull, +1 for state police.

Roadside assitance arrived after more than 2hrs after I got an eta of less than 1hr... Extremely bad service for the Ferrari-Maserati-Alfa assistance center...

These are some pics I found around the internet:
 

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Wow! How did this happen? Have they told you waht caused the wheels to lock up?

Best regards,
 

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You're very lucky...
Well, technically speaking he's less lucky than someone whose transmission didn't spontaneously lock up.
 

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Too many computers controlling modern cars ... eventually the number of people kill or injured by this miss-use of technology will get high enough that hopefully we will relise our stupid human mistake (again).

Let the human being drive the car please and thus have FULL control. All planes still allow full manual operation for this reason but cars don't ... :confused:
Pete
 

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Ever been on an Airbus?
Wow, an 8C locks up on the road, and suddenly the old "Airbus is a flying plastic automatic computer" myth comes crawling out of the woodwork again. If this happened e.g. because a gear tooth broke off and wedged itself in the gears, a manual gearbox (whatever the definition is this week) would not have mattered.

Luddites go to the theatre, the rest of us watch TV.
 

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Too many computers controlling modern cars ... eventually the number of people kill or injured by this miss-use of technology will get high enough that hopefully we will relise our stupid human mistake (again).

Let the human being drive the car please and thus have FULL control. All planes still allow full manual operation for this reason but cars don't ... :confused:
Pete
I wonder how many accidents or near accidents have been caused by electronic failure? I agree that all these things should be able to be switched off. I think that stability control that is often touted by "experts" to be essential, is sometimes used by manufacturers to mask less than ordinary suspension design. If that is the case, switching it off could be downright dangerous of course.
 

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... miss-use of technology will get high enough that hopefully we will relise our stupid human mistake (again).
Pete
Hee Hee - been an issue pretty much since we tamed fire....
 

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Ever been on an Airbus?
I believe Airbus's can now be put into a mode where the computers actually do exactly what the pilot says, thus effectively a manual control.

My point was that computers are not always right for various reasons, for example it is impossible to write a program that is bug free and considers every possible scenario, and on top of that sensors give trouble ...

Stability control was mentioned above and my view on this is it does very little and really is used as a marketing ploy, ie. my car has more gadgets than yours. On a related topic I hired a car recently and it had traction control and the car had amazing grip out of corners, etc. but I could see the traction control light blinking often ... so I turned traction control off to find it had very low levels of grip, so yes in this case I agree that traction control is masking poor suspension design.

Regarding the suggestion that a tooth broke, well that is possible but it is more likely surely that the computer tried to select 2 gears at once.
Pete
 

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Stability control was mentioned above and my view on this is it does very little and really is used as a marketing ploy, ie. my car has more gadgets than yours.
Pete
The trouble is that ignorant politicians, people with vested interests and others want it made compulsory. Just as with ABS, people will drive poorly, believing that the electronics will protect them and when something does go wrong they won't have the skill to do anything about it and disaster will result. The general public has no idea of how these things work and what their limitations are. A skilled driver needs none of these gadgets.
 

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I believe Airbus's can now be put into a mode where the computers actually do exactly what the pilot says, thus effectively a manual control.
Well normally the Airbus does what the pilot tells it to do. Its when the computers fault that things change and there is no manual backup in the event of a complete electrical or hydraulic failure.

As for the 8C, the actual locking of the wheels had to be mechanical but maybe the computers initiated some action that caused a mechanical breakdown.
 

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Well normally the Airbus does what the pilot tells it to do. Its when the computers fault that things change and there is no manual backup in the event of a complete electrical or hydraulic failure.
In the event of a complete failure of all the hydraulic systems, you've been SOL since the de Havilland Comet first flew in 1949.

Computer controlled anything seems to bring peoples' passions to a boil. My perspective is that solid-state electronic systems have proven to be much more reliable than mechanical devices. Their weakness is invariably the software. Some people are more comfortable with familiar mechanical issues than fairly new software issues.

There are examples of computer failure causing aircraft to crash. A Lauda Air (owned by Niki Luda--see how I brought that back on topic :)) 767 was lost when an electronically controlled thrust reverser was actuated in flight. On the other hand, Continental flight 3407 crashed outside Buffalo, NY, when the pilot ignored the DH-8's computer. The aircraft was stalling, the computer tried desperately to get the aircraft into a nose-down AoA to pick up speed, but the pilot was able to override the system and crash the aircraft.

Neither mechanical nor digital systems are perfect, but to assume that electronic systems are unreliable compared to a mechanical system is not accurate.

Thanks,
Alex
 

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In the event of a complete failure of all the hydraulic systems, you've been SOL since the de Havilland Comet first flew in 1949.

Thanks,
Alex
Negative, the Boeing 727 has manual backup in case of total hydraulic failure (Boeing calls it "manual reversion"). It first flew in 1964 and it's still faster than any Airbus.

Greg
 

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Negative, the Boeing 727 has manual backup in case of total hydraulic failure (Boeing calls it "manual reversion"). It first flew in 1964 and it's still faster than any Airbus.

Greg
Interesting, I didn't know that. For the record, the Il-62 also has mechanical linkages to flight surfaces (in fact, it only has mechanical linkages), and there are probably others too.

Of course, both are mechanical systems, so...

Thanks,
Alex
 

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In the event of a complete failure of all the hydraulic systems, you've been SOL since the de Havilland Comet first flew in 1949.

Computer controlled anything seems to bring peoples' passions to a boil. My perspective is that solid-state electronic systems have proven to be much more reliable than mechanical devices. Their weakness is invariably the software. Some people are more comfortable with familiar mechanical issues than fairly new software issues.

...

Thanks,
Alex
Alex,

Correct. I am a software engineer, now manager, and there is no way in heck that I will ever believe it is possible to right perfect software, and driving a car is extremely complex, harder than flying a plane by miles.

Also sensors fail and that sends the wrong message to the software which then makes incorrect decisions. My guess is this is the problem in this case.

Greg Gordon, Regarding the Airbus. My point is not with electrical connections or wiring, etc. after all I'm pretty **** sure ALL planes no longer have any physical connection between the pilot and the rudder, etc. (even Boeing's) but that you can go on to a psuedo manual operation where the computer simply does what it is told without questioning it. It no longer takes directions and makes a decision, which is where the problem lies, ie. software making ALL the decisions in a life and death situation, just wrong.
Pete
 

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Speaking as someone who has had to fix things when the electronics go wrong-read sensors failing, wiring breaking down and failing, PCB boards breaking through vibration etc -all causing stoppage or malfunction (all brands not just Euros) I have a cynical view of electronics and their place in cars. Yes I wonder at their fantastic capability but the useful service life of any modern car with electronics is going to be a decade at the most for Joe Average unless he is very very lucky.
As is the case with this 8C problems can occur at any time in the cars life, even when it is a baby like this car, but what a can of worms for the future. "Electronic" cars aargh..
 

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Didn't the pilots of QF32 land the aircraft manually? Sure the controls don't have cables and bell cranks these days but still......Who hasn't had something mechanical break on their Alfa?

Regardless good to hear your 8C and you came out of this one unscathed.
 

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In the event of a complete failure of all the hydraulic systems, you've been SOL since the de Havilland Comet first flew in 1949.
As Greg says,Not true. The B737 can also be flown in "manual reversion". I believe the 737 was the last airliner built with true full redundancy, meaning it still had cables to activate the control surfaces in the event of total system failure.
 
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