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Discussion Starter #1
Please help Im trying to change the oil on my newly aquired 78 spider for teh first time and i cant get teh oil drain plug off. I have a 27 mm socket and a half inch drive and that sucker wont budge when i turn counter clockwise. Am I doing this right?
 

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Yes. Unless it's different than my '84, "righty tighty, lefty loosey" for the oil plug is correct.

You may find that the plug has seized, brass plug against aluminum oil pan. Or, a PO may have put some sealant on the threads to stop a leak (bad, very bad). I guess worse case scenario would be that the threads of the oil pan gall and strip and then you'd be looking for another pan or possibly having a "helicoil" insert installed. Not something to look forward to in either case.

If you haven't already, try to loosen the plug once the car has warmed up. If you're daring, and can be careful, the judicious application of some heat to the plug may help loosen it. Just remember where you're at, and what flamable fluid residues are in the vicinity. A heat gun would be the sensible choice I'd think.

Once you do get it off, look for the copper ring gasket. It's reusable, not a compression type like on some lesser cars. It's easily forgotten about and will help minimize any weeping leakage if the surface of the oil pan that it comes in contact with, the ring itself and the sealing surface of the oil plug are all carefully cleaned before reassembling.

I've tried to get into the habit of using anti-seize on nearly every threaded fastener, especially those with the mating of disimilar metals. I've even used copper anti-seize on my NGK spark plugs. Copper based on the spark plugs because it is conductive. I seem to recall reading somewhere in the shop manual that the torque settings for the plugs was with the application of some sort of moly lube and figured that some sort of lube was better than the "dry" of the plug threads out of the box.

You don't need a lot of anti-seize either, just a uniform, light coating. And, with the spark plugs, because the copper based anti-seize IS conductive, be very carefull about not getting any on the electrode's porcelain insulator or it will track and short circuit and not work properly.

Hope some of this is of help.
 

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no luck what should i do next? Should I try to muscle it? I was thinking to put a pipe over the handle of my 1/2 in drive to get more leverage. also the 27 mm 12 point socket feels a little bit wiggly. 27 mm is the right size correct? I also tried tapping the bolt and spraying liquid wrench around it to lossen things up but no luck. What should I try next?
 

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27mm IS the correct size. Did you try a little heat, per John's suggestion?? It did the trick for me a few months ago. Be very careful, as you know it's aluminum. I used a heat gun, and applied heat to the nut for probably 20 or 30 seconds
 

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Advice: if anything is stuck, don't use a 12 point, go to the 6 point or you'll end up stripping it before it comes loose.
 

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RedSpider makes a very good point regarding the use of a 6 point vs a 12 point socket wrench in situations such as this ie. stubborn nut/bolt.

"Impact" sockets (heavier, thicker, beefier wall thickness) are always of the 6 point style for that very reason;more of the wrench in contact with the offending fastener.
 

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All of the above plus when the plug gets this stubborn you dont want to be working under the car on the garage floor. Put the car on an overhead hoist so you can see what youre doing. Make sure theres no oil coating the head of the drain plug or the wrench to guard against slipping.
Re heating the plug with a heat gun....I dont know but would the brass expand more when heated than aluminium? If so, maybe trying to remove it when it was cold would work better.
 

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Re heating the plug with a heat gun....I dont know but would the brass expand more when heated than aluminium? If so, maybe trying to remove it when it was cold would work better.

Does anyone know if this is a problem? should I heat the plug or the surrounding sump? Or doe it not matter because both will heat up regardless?
 

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I checked the web and aluminium expands slightly more than brass when heated , so heating should help http://www.p1m.com/expansion.htm. The optimal temperatures for thermal expansion are also interesting, much less than I thought would be needed.
 

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Yes, there are different coefficients of expansion for the disimilar materials, aluminum and brass, but I've always thought that the benefit to be derived from the application of heat would be getting both materials, similar or not, moving with/against one another.

Just my 2¢.
 

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Guess what...mine is stripped.The engine was nice and hot, the tool the right size but the plug just wouldn't budge...and then the socket slipped. Only slipped a couple of times but enough that the hex head on the plug is rounded off. Now what?

Does anyone have any posiitve experinces with this dilema?

Ric.
 

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You might get away with heating things up again, then just before trying to put the socket to it, slap a ice cube onto just the drainplug which will cause it to contract, possibly enough to get things free. (heck, you might even hear it 'pop' if it contracts enough)
 

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It's not righty and lefty. It's clockwise and counterclockwise. If you're turning a nut clockwise it's turning right for half of the circle and left for the other half.
 
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