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Discussion Starter #1
Hi knowledgable alfistis.

I am replacing rotors and pads and rebuilding the cylinders all the way around my 1986 Spider.

Before checking the forums, I took apart one of the rear cylinders and split it in half in order to remove the brake shoes, because I could see no other way to do this as there are two posts running between the two halves of the caliper, which the shoes travel back and forth on as the pistons compress them.

However, when I was reading the forums trying to figure out how to compress the pistons, it has been suggested that the calipers should not be split and that there is no need to split them.

My questions is, how is one supposed to get the brake shoes off if the caliper isn't split?? There doesn't seem to be a way to slide the pins that are threaded through the brake shoes out unless the caliper is split.

There must be a secret that soembody can enlighten me with.... thanks for looking.:confused:
 

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1966-2013
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You mean the pins that the actual brake pads ride on?

Ummm, those get drove out with a suitably sized punch and a light hammer.

Removing them is done from the 'outside' in, replacing them is done from the 'inside' out.

Knock one out, let the cross spring relieve a bit of it's tension, knock the other one out and pull the shoes up out of the hole. (you may or may not have to lever the pistons back a bit to release the shoes)

Putting it back together is more or less the same:

Get both shoes in, start one pin, but don't run it all the way across until you get one end of the cross spring tucked under it, then send it the rest of the way.

Start the other pin, compress the cross spring with your fingers 'til the pin goes across and engages it's hole on the other side, then tap it home.

You don't have to worry about driving the pins too far in during reassembly as they have little clips on them and the holes they rest in are countersunk just special for them.

Granted you shouldn't wail the crap out of them with a BFH, but beyond that, they are something you'll defintely know when they are seated fully. (if in doubt, they tend to sit pretty well flush on the back side and the tone of the hammer & punch get significantly different)


****..... there I go typing slow again.

Hi Elio :wave:
 

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Search on "Calipers" and "Split".
There is a spirited discussion on whether to split the calipers. I did it and was able to re-use the O-rings.

Never had a problem with leakage.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi John.

Yeah, I think it was that discussion I was reading where I learned that splitting them may be bad.

I read in that discussion that IAP won't take back split calipers as cores- I find that extremely strange. It's just a couple of o-rings right??

Anyway, the o-rings that I've got sit about a millimeter or two higher than the mating surface of the caliper, so they'll be compressed when they are put back together. I don't think I'll have a problem with leakage on that caliper at least.

I will try to do it the proper way on the others though. If I spring a leak later on - well, there's always 2nd gear to slow me down. :eek: Good thing I put new synchros in.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It looks like one of the problems I was having with the first rear caliper I worked on was that it had seized.

The other rear cylinder was far easier to compress. Also, the replacement shoes (ferodo i think) don't have the angled slot that the piston's cutout sat in on the old shoes. Is this cutout just a bit of extra over-engineering so the cylinders don't rotate?
 

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Angled slot? Kinda like what's shown on the right in this picture?

You're seeing a fair bit of wear on the back of what used to be a flat plate when the pads were new.

You'll also want to go here then read the instructions and DL the template to help you re-align the pistons when you put it back together, as they have to orientate a specific way to work well.
 
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