Alfa Romeo Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
424 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
As many of you have these days at home I’ve got some extra time on my hands. I’ve traveled a lot for a couple years and the Alfa project has stalled. Since travel isn’t possible time to restart this provided I can stay healthy.

The body is stripped, completely of parts, nuts, bolts and is largely paint free other than a little primer. Engine, head, rear axle, gearbox rebuilt. Time to get on body work. I’d hoped to learn to weld and do some of the non supportive metalwork, have not yet tried but have equipment.

What I’d like to do with my time is the following:

Prime all removable parts with a good primer after completely sanding and stripping to bare clean metal(some parts have rattle can primer protection after stripping, some are bare metal with Eastwood rust remover on them which seems to protect surface from flash rush and leaves a paintable surface). Should I just reprepare the surfaces and with what, to clean metal and immediately prime? Or would application. Or rust remover be a good surface and allow a few days to prime directly yo that surface? I‘m also interested in primer to use? Self etch? Other recommendations? I’m planning to build a small temp paint booth to prime the parts.

For actual priming, I’ve got a typical compressor, and a reasonably good gun to apply. What would the compressor spec requirements be typically to paint? I’d not try painting with my set up but I’m thinking with some practice I can be good enough for that first priming coat, bad idea?

Filler. I like the idea of filler after first prime coat, sand, and then reprime. Seems to be mixed feeling on this.

then I’d leave to professionals to continue from there and do rest of body.

As far as the rest of body would completion of strip and clean and rust remover be a good way to send to shop for final weldin, prime and the rest?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
280 Posts
Always believed Filler should go on to bare metal before any primer, the cheap compressors will get you spraying grey primer to protect things while you work and prepare it, it doesn't matter if the thing is running you should aim for about 50-60 psi, but google it and search for information, it is out there. What ever you do the body shop will likely take things back to metal to see what they are repairing when it comes to rust repairs. The rust converted surfaces can withstand the environment for a while with out primer but if there is a period before they are worked on you will eventually get surface rust, the grey primers won't hold out for long before they get it but the red oxide primers last much longer.
Tim
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
424 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Getting back to the trunk space, the spare tire well was rusted fairly badly so ordered this one from Eurospares. Having a heck of a time with getting it to go to place, clearly it was not the last part to be welded into place at the factory....

Two years ago or so before the project stalled it was one of the last things I was doing on the car. As you can see from pictures I've done some cutting and and bending to get stuff out of the way. The area marked seems to be the problem now but because there is a vertical support below that I can't cut and bend to get it out of the way.

Suggestions on how to wrestle this into place with causing the least damage and additional welding needs? I'm beginning to wonder if multiple cuts in the lip of the well, bending them up, and then insert from below is the best bet.
Screen Shot 2020-04-19 at 1.36.50 PM.png
Screen Shot 2020-04-19 at 1.36.50 PM.png
IMG_3261.jpeg IMG_3262.jpeg IMG_3263.jpeg IMG_3264.jpeg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
I suggest epoxy over bare metal, then filler if needed, then high build primer, with additional filler used when blocking. If we have patching or the epoxy gets otherwise ground off, we re-apply every time. Clean every surface with wax & grease remover every time you put something on, even filler. We use a two step acid system to prep bare metal. I’ve put those spare tire wells in - not had trouble. Is the hole cut out large enough?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
424 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
It’s the correct diameter, yes. Centerline product. I can’t be the only one with these issues....the tailight “bucket” internally is what made it difficult to get to place.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top