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Discussion Starter #1
I'm planning on (finaly) replacing the lower oil pan gasket with a friend of mine, but I wanted to make sure I've got it right first. My understanding of the procedure is you drain the oil first, remove the oil pan, clean it out, remove the old gasket, replace with new gasket and replace, using very minimal torque, replace oil.

My questions after doing a couple searches...
What do I do with my oil after I drain it?
How am I cleaning out this oil pan?
How much gasket sealer should I be using? I've got the Wurth stuff from IAP.
 

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Good timing, as I just did this very same job on my '74 this morning. First, beware that even with all the oil drained via the drain plug, there will still be a fair amount of oil in the labyrinth of the lower pan. Spread some newspaper and be prepared for a minor mess. next, I just wiped out most of the sludge with about a 1/2 roll of paper towels, and then used some water-soluble degreaser for the final cleanup. I'll confess that I then took the pan to the local self-service car wash and blasted the fins clean with the high-pressure sprayer. Many auto parts stores will accept used engine oil for recycling, and that's what I do, once I've got 5 gallons or so accumulated. Finally, I just used the paper gasket with only a few thin (and I mean as thin as can be) spots of silicone gasket sealer on the lower pan section to hold the gasket in place while I bolted the pan back up. I've pulled apart too many motors with oil strainers full of gasket sealer to use any more than that, and the paper gasket works fine if your mating surfaces are clean and true.

Actually the biggest issue I had with this job (I had to replace the oil pump, too) was that my sump guard had taken a few too many hard hits and it was sprung. Once off the car, the distance between the front and rear mounts was about 1/2 - 3/4" too long, and I had to beat the guard with a heavy sledge hammer to reshape it before it would fit back on the chassis. Good luck with yours.

PS, why not flush out your Spica pump while you're at it? Remove the altitude compensator and slowly pour maybe 1/2 quart of fresh motor oil down the hole. The excess will flow out of the pump into the engine sump, so there's no need to worry about overfilling, and fresh oil will do your Spica pump a world of good. The oil in the rear section of the pump is basically stagnant, so unless you flush it occasionally, it can get pretty nasty.
 
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