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Discussion Starter #1
I have just come inside from stripping my Giulia Super's original 1600 engine down to a bare block. It was relatively pain free and I was liking what I was seeing until I removed the liners. It was pretty flakey between the liners and there are definitely some corrosive craters down into the bottom of the block where the coolant sits.(or water as I am guessing the PO used more often than not)

I think the liner seats where the O rings go looked OK but I won't know until I clean it up properly. This is the second early 105 series 1600 that I have pulled down and seen the same symptoms.

Can the cavities in this block be filled and sealed professionally?

Do I even need to if the liners seat OK and it will be cared for til death do us part?
 

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for a good diagnose pictures are necessary.
 

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Do I even need to if the liners seat OK and it will be cared for til death do us part?
[/QUOTE]

Fortunately the liners only sit on a portion of the machined surface of the block. So long as the area directly beneath the actual liner seat is OK you shouldn't have a problem.
 

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Even in blocks that have always run coolant (instead of water), some pitting in that area seems normal. You might get away with using the stock O rings - but if there is a leak, a lot of disassembly/reassembly is required to fix it.

I always smear some high temp silicone sealant along the circumfrence of the lower liner before inserting it into the block. when doing this, you still install the O ring to properly the position the liner vertically. Yes, the silicone makes it harder to remove the liner down the road (you need a press, rather than a hammer). No, it shouldn't be necessary. But somehow, given the time required to address a leak in this area, I think of the added silicone as a "belt and suspenders" -type of solution.
 

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There's a lot of corrosion there but you really won't know anything for certain until the block is clean. There are some apparent bad places that look like they reach across or deeply into the seating surfaces.

This might be a good time to start looking for a 2L replacement engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yeah, not looking good. Will take it to a mechanic for his opinion. I really wanted to keep it stock but I do have a 2L complete with carbs, gearbox and cable clutch I could drop straight in and see how it goes... Either that or see if I can find a decent 10526 block lying around somewhere.
 

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The block is still good enough, the solution indicated by Alfajay is the solution to your problem, some hi-temp silicone sealing will assure the coolant circuit tightness.
 

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Pitting on block-Sealant or weld?

The head had severe pitting and is being welded and milled so wondering if I have to do something similar to the block or if sealant will do the trick.
 

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My 2L had lots of corrosion also. I was advised to soak it really well in a strong full strength degreaser like Super Clean. I used a spray bottle, sprayed it several times a day for 2 days. Then washed it with soap and water. Next, spray it with an etching Aluminum cleaner used for wheels. The block came out really clean. Almost all of the corrosion was gone and I could clearly see problem areas. I had 2 big pits just outside the machined face for the liners and a couple of small pits on the flat machined surface in 2 cylinders. Nothing on the vertical surfaces. I filled the holes with JB Weld. I'm in the process of assembling the engine.
 

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As mentioned, it needs to be CLEAN before you can diagnose anything. You may have to resort to a SOFT media blast, walnut hulls, soda blasting or the like, and then an aluminum cleaner. Once you see what is down there, MOST damage in the critical areas respond well to JB Weld repair, and cleaning up the liner "O" ring seal area, then continue with a very light coating of a sealant over the "O" ring (like Permetex Grey that remains rubbery). I also smear the skirt bores in the block (not liner skirts) with a heavy grease both for a sealant, as well as a disassembly and anti-corrosion aid. I had Richard Jemison make me up a 1600 seat "O" ring area burnishing tool out of a junk 1600 liner. It is used with a thick paste made up of Borax and water.
 

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I can attest to Gordon's comments regarding "clean". Once all the rust and corrosion is gone, the holes were much bigger than I expected, but the block salvageable. At least I was able to get a really clean surface for the JB Weld to adhere to. Once the block and head are assembled, I plan on pressure testing the coolant side with the pan off. I did this with my V6 rebuild and had to remove the head again for a gasket leak. It saved a lot of "head"aches once the engine was in the car.
 
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