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Discussion Starter #1
Just posting a reference for a method of doing this for a 105 gearbox when it is fully disassembled in case useful to anyone at some point. Didn't find one posted elsewhere on the BB.

Rigging up a way to support the awkward shape of the case is easily done with a couple of strategically placed deep well sockets. Just be sure to have them more or less directly across from each other to properly support the tail so that you don't damage it with the press.

FWIW.
1605529
 

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I can understand your predicament if you don't have the factory tool to remove the bushing. There is a bit of a load put on that bushing to get it to move out of the hole it is locked into. It does not come out easily as one might think. To have those sockets underneath makes me cringe thinking one of those is going to take off under load.

That actually happened to me using a socket between the part I was pressing and the press. It took off and went flying across the garage like a bullet. It was fortunate it didn't hit anything but the wall.

Best to go to your pipe supply source and find some piping that is a good fit for the top and larger enough to support the tail shaft on the bottom side. You might spend $10 in the pipe but it is so worth the effort.

To reinstall the bushing it never wants to start in straight and you can actually break the tail housing if you apply to much force, when the bushing is going in crooked.

I just did 5 of these for the rebuilt gearboxes sitting here on the floor, so I am just passing along some sage advice.
 

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Hint: Gentle HEAT helps both processes and a bit of grease/oil on the reassembly. Remember the "smily face" sits up and down.
 

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I use a propane torch to warm the tail shaft, and some white grease to ease the process. I like your idea of the smiley face. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hmm...not sure I see how it is much different than the 2-armed puller method used widely by many. This version just uses a press. Heat does help. Agreed, tho, this should be any easy press...not too much force.

Smiley face...that’s a great way to remember the orientation! I had to look it up in the manual.

 

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Easiest way I’ve found: heat the housing with a torch, then hit the metal ring of the bushing with an air hammer. Pops it right out.
 

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then hit the metal ring of the bushing with an air hammer. Pops it right out.
[/QUOTE]

May I borrow your air hammer? I threw mine away, it made too much &@#^!+ noise (true story).
 

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In the days when all new bushings were the correct diameter I pushed the old one out and the new one in at the same time a big gear puller. It could be done from the underside of the car. These days it is hard to know if the new one will fit. I had one that was hard to get in so I froze it and heated the housing. The bushing went in and the housing cracked when the temperatures equalized.
 

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To continue Ed's dialog above, BEST measure the old one when pushed out and make the new one the same exact OD on a lathe, drill press or whatever you have!
 

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May I borrow your air hammer? I threw mine away, it made too much &@#^!+ noise (true story).
$12.99 at Hazard Fraught. Yeah, I spent the big bucks! :D


But seriously it works great, and I don't even have a very big compressor. You can do it right on the car, just drop the back of the transmission.
 

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I buy 6 mounts at a time and take them and a oem nos one to the machine shop and have the new ones cut down to the correct size.

The other reason the new ones are hard to go in is because the outside of the metal ring is really rough. Originals were ground down smooth to the correct size after they were made.

Last time I talked to Joe at Centerline he told me they check everyone that comes in for the correct diameter. The over sized ones get sent out to be machined down. Kudos to them for going above and beyond for good customer service of these.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Another thing I have had happen when installing a new one is to have the rubber on the bushing I froze peel off the bushing housing when placed inside the heated gearbox mount. So another thing to watch out for.
 

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Too hot!
 

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Akron which makes most of the rubber bushing for these cars now.

I've had suspension bushing de bond from the housing before. On your mount the rubber probably wasn't bonded well to the sleeve.

I can't imagine that you would have heated the trans case hotter then it gets when the car is in use.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Yeah was heating with propane canister when I did that one, so can’t imagine it got too terribly hot. Just in combo with the frozen bushing, it made the rubber unhappy. So just a consideration to anyone who reads this, in any event. Maybe I just got a bad part.

The couple I have done since, I either heat the case or freeze the bushing, but not both. Having that happen made me a little gun shy. Ones I have done we’re out of the car, though. So easier to correct mistakes if they happen (haven’t had any since).
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Just an add-on to this thread. I have another gearbox to do so thought it would be handy to have a length of pipe around instead of using sockets in the original post above. If you don't already have the pipe, you'll likely figure out it is hard to find because you need greater that 2" pipe. And if you do find it, it'll cost a small fortune unless you can find some scrap some place. At least that was my experience on the US west coast.

Just posting to maybe save anyone who comes across this some time.
 

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I just did one yesterday. I started it in my vice squeezing it until it was square, then finished it off in the press using a flat plate on each side. Then a socket to drive it in to finish.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
You meant to put the new bushing in? Yeah - I do similar, except it heat the tail a bit to make getting a good square start easier.
 

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Hi all. Some questions re: transmission mount replacement:

1. Can this be done with the gearbox in the car and dropped a bit?
2. Does it make sense to do the De Dion pivot bushing at the same time? If yes, then can both of these replacements be done in situ or are we now at the point where it makes sense to just remove from car?
3. I know there a tool for the pivot bushing replacement; is there one for the transmission mount?

Thanks!
 
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