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I read about removing door hinge pins but didn't see any pics so here is how I did it. This was my first try and it isn't very pretty but I think it is going to work out OK in the end. With more precise and better tools it could be safer but I was very careful.

Step 1 - First pic is how the top hinge looked after removing it from the door.

Step 2 - Using the drill press I drilled the pins from each end only as far as needed to get through where the two pieces come together. I used a small bit first, then the largest bit I was comfortable with given how well I was centered on the pin with the first hole. I didn't want to risk opening up the hinge any by accidentally drilling into the hinge itself so I played it safe. Not all of the holes looked as perfect as this picture!

Step 3 - Then using a pick, I pulled out the composite? washer that was all busted up in between the hinge pieces, thereby making room for a hacksaw. I really didn't want to have to do this but I saw no other way. There was just enough room to get the saw in there without making the space any bigger by messing up the hinge pieces. The only sawing necessary was to cut through what was left of the pin. I did this very carefully!

Step 4 - I used a punch to push out the 2 pieces in the outer hinge and 1 larger piece in the inner hinge. I had used some penetrating oil and they started to come out with some very gentle taps, then I grabbed the exposed part with pliers and pulled them the rest of the way. I had to be extra careful here because my punch wasn't long enough to reach through the hinge to be centered. They came out easily but if really stuck I would have had to use a punch with a longer nose.

Step 5 - You can see what it all looked like in the last pic.

I think this procedure is a little risky in several ways:

1. You don't want to drill into the hinge itself

2. The saw really creates an opportunity to remove some material in the hinge itself which would make slop you would have to fill in with a washer when inserting the new pin

3. If you are ham handed with the punch you could enlarge the hinge hole or even break off the tab

So you have to be gentle with this procedure I think.
 

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If you want to use a hack saw, be sure to "de-set" the teeth by lapping the sides of the blade on a medium to coarse stone (file isn't hard enough). This will keep the saw from widening the slot.

Robert
 

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Crikey - must have been well corroded in to go to those lengths.. I placed an old 3/8 drive socket (of suitable diameter - 8mm) in a vice and drove the pin completly through the socket drive hole. Check the hinge pin and you'll see the 'spline' that grips the hinge. Drive this end through the socket. I think it was on the top of the top hinge and bottom of the bottom hinge.
The punch tended to slip so I changed over to a center punch to get it moving. The center punch keyed into the top of the pin and stopped it slipping off.
Use plenty of penetrating oil for as long as possible before driving the pin
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I think I was just too scared to beat too hard on the pin. Nervous about cracking the hinge. I completed the retrofit and all works nice now (no sag)!
 

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Complete

Here is the completed job. I don't know if this hinge kit was IAP or Centerline (I bought one of each some time apart). They appear to be exactly the same. I started the new pin with a few hammer taps, got most of the way with the vise and finished with the press.

One of the hinges is really tight and the other is nice. Not sure why one is tighter but hoping it will work itself in. No measurable sag in the door at the back edge.

Note the new SS fasteners on the right side and the best of the fasteners previously in place on the left side. I couldn't find enough of the SS ones to do the whole job. Also I couldn't find any pointed fasteners at my local HW store so I had to start the first few with the originals to get the backing plate aligned and then replace with the SS. So far I'm finding the SS heads actually kind of soft as I had to remove the lower hinge and take out a shim I had put in there and already started stripping two of the heads. So I'm not sure about SS for this application.

I used anti-seize under the heads and Loctite blue on the threads.

I used the POR13 on the door jambs just under the hinges just to hold me over until the repaint comes. Not pretty but then the whole paint job isn't pretty either.

Comments before I do the other side?
 

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You shouldn't be able to strip the heads. Are you using a good-quality key? Not a ball-end I hope? It should fit quite tightly - any slop at all and it will create stress points at the driving faces. Make sure it has snug contact right to the bottom of the hole, and you'll break the key before stripping the head.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Craftsman socket key. Tapped home before I started turning. Only happened on 2 bolts. Maybe a couple of lousy bolts? Or maybe the whole batch?
 
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