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Discussion Starter #1
I own a Bosch car for the first time, an 89 Spider. Anything special in removing the cam cover re the VVT solenoid? I've never been in a post-Spica engine before. Thanks

Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter #3
So the solenoid just presses against the cam mechanism? No positive attachment?

Andrew
 

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1966-2013
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No positive attachment. Just a few parts that when deactivated don't neccisarily even touch each other, then all bunch up and press together when the VVT goes live.

There's a nail shaped plunger pin in there that goes from the inside out which actually does the work with the cam.

So you've got the solinoid on the outside, which doesn't go anywhere near the cam, the plunger, which when pressed by the solinoid tip, presses yet another little button on the end of the VVT proper changing the oil routing and activating it.

You definitely want to lift from the rear first onnaconna if that plunger hangs in the end of the lip on the VVT and you manage to get it to come out of the cam cover, you'll be looking at tearing the engine down to some degrees to recover it from the timing chest or oil pan.

*It's a bit more tedious, but significantly safer to remove the solinoid mount, pull the plunger as far forward as it'll go, then wrap a piece of tape or a tightly wound rubber band onto it so it can't just fall out while your doing the removal and install. (it may seem a bit anal, but hey, I've never dropped one down into the engine doing it that way.....)

Edited to add attachment.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I pulled the cam cover off to check the valve clearances, and I didn't need to worry at all that the plunger would fall in, because it was installed backwards with the large flat outside at the solenoid, and the pin inwards. So it would only fall out of the cam cover outside, if the solenoid was removed. So installed, the pin does not hit the plunger on the VVT valve on the cam at all when activated, so this car wasn't getting advance or retard, whichever the solenoid does when it operates.

How does it operate? Retarded until a certain RPM is hit, activating the solenoid and advancing the cam?

Andrew
 

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1966-2013
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The inertia style VVT comes on at a specific RPM range, while the solinoid one only activates when the throttle position sensor has gone through 57+ degrees of motion.

No, yours wasn't working as the point of the plunger couldn't touch the button on the cam (see cutaway).

Yes, it advances the cam when activated by approximately 11 degrees. (once corrected, you'll likely feel improvement from about 3300-3500 up to redline but not so noticable below that point)

To test if you've got it right after you set the solinoid (it's kinda specific about what has to be done) you can turn the key on (engine off) and roll the throttle full on. You should hear the solinoid click when it kicks on.

Once that's confirmed, unhook the TPS connector, fire the engine and jumper between terminals 3 and 18. This will fool the VVT into thinking you're flat on the gas, whihc in turn will activate it.

Net result will be the idle dropping off quite a bit and getting really lopey, (you know, making idle noises like it's cammed :) ), and it may even stall.

If you don't know how to set the soliniod, chase this link
 

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Discussion Starter #7
In terms of setting the cam timing, I assume you just line up the marks like an earlier non-VVT cam? Presumably the VVT mechanism is solid enough when the engine is not running to prevent rotation, and maintain the retarded position, and that's what you line the marks up on?

Andrew
 

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1966-2013
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Yes, the VVT will hold it's place while you do the cam timing thing.

Actually the cam will rotate inside of it if you're doing it properly by loosening the big nut on the front. Same goes for the exhaust side AFA the cam rotating inside the drive gear. (DON'T drop that little bolt or nut that goes through the exhaust gear, unless you want to tear the engine down to retrieve it)

You're after the mark on the back/firewall side of the front cam bearing journals and lined up with the tickmark in the edge of the cam journal shoulder.
 
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