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Discussion Starter #1
I've been looking at one of the salvage TB bearings that I have on hand. I removed one side cover sheild and ball bearing cage and found there is very little grease in it. When rotating the bearing feels good with a very tiny amount of noise when turned by hand.

My question is:

1. How much grease should be in these bearing?
2. What type of grease is best . . . ordinary gray or red wheel bearing grease?
3. When cleaned and re-greased, do you think the bearing would be serviceable?
 

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If you know the bearing manufacture you should be able to determine the appropriate grease. With that being said a high performance wheel bearing grease should suffice. I wouldn't pack it full. The faster a roller bearing spins, the less grease is required. Just as shown is plenty.

What concerns me is the bearing in the lower picture; right side. If this is not grease or a reflection of some kind I would buy a new bearing. You should be able tell more definitively once the bearing has been cleaned.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I inspected the ball bearings and they look good under a magnifying glass. What you're seeing is reflection and grease.

From what I gather from previous threads and doing some internet surfing, the bearing should be packed with about 25% full around the bearing cages (not the entire inside of the bearing). I know Jason at Alfissimo uses Krytox, but still looking for normal grease.

According to what I read, you DON'T want to pack the bearing full because all that does is create more heat buildup. I guess its normal for these bearing to appear light on grease quantity. I guess also, you don't want to mix greases.
 

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John,

Soak the bearing overnight in diesel fuel or kerosene, to soften the old grease, then wash it all out with carb or brake cleaner spray can and wand. The cheap one from Walmart will be fine. Let dry.

When it's dry, you'll be able to feel the smoothness in the bearing, and see any problems too. DO NOT spin the bearing fast when it is dry.

To replace the grease, use high-temp grease (or Krytox) just push some in, turn the bearing a time or two and wipe away any surplus. Put the seal back and you're done.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I cleaned the bearing out well. Smooth. Re-greased with synthetic green grease (working temp up to 500F). Greased bearing area with about 20% full. Bearing very smooth and has about the same amount of viscous turning resistance as the new bearing I have.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I did my second spare bearing also. Came out very well. Very smooth with no slop. These SKF bearing appear to be very well made.

Getting a shield off one side to gain access to the bearings is difficult. A sharp bulletin board pin works ok with a small screwdriver to pry it off. However the sealing edges are plastic and will probably break where you pry it. The center section is metal. When re-installing the shield, I had to repair the missing plastic with Liquid Steel.

Looks and feels good, but I haven't actually proved the durability in a hot engine compartment.
 

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Sounds like success. You will have to fill us in on the longevity test.

You will be hard pressed to find a better bearing than SKF. In manufacturing we SKF for quite a few different applications, bearings being one of them. If you get a free minute check out their web site. SKF
Lots of great tools!
 
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