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I'm in the market to buy a 69-74 GTV that I can restore and upgrade to a casual track car for a few historical races.
Any suggestions? What kind of price range is reasonable? What 'red flags' should I stay away from?
Also, as for investment purposes, what things should I always leave as stock? What things are most important to restore to original?

Also, for those who own one... do you still like it? Is it 'fun' to drive? Does it "start conversations" with other car lovers? How costly is it to maintain and restore?

Looking forward to hearing everyone's experiences.

Thanks!
Doug
 

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71 Berlina 74 GTV 17 Giulia Q4
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I just finished restoring a 74 and use it as a daily driver. Adding the rear evaproator aircon now. Moderate to serious engine mods and it gets a 10 on the wow factor with people who see it.
rust is what you really want to look out for and one that is straight. Your budget will determine what happens. Take a look at the retoration thread for some great info, all the threads really. Welcome and good luck, you picked a great car to get into!
 
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Thanks for the reply... what made you decide on a '74?
Please tell me more...
 

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71 Berlina 74 GTV 17 Giulia Q4
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in my opinion and we know what those are worth, the 74 was the best mix of modern features and the classis old school. Not the mention the 74 was the best one I found. A no rust or hardly any and straight. Actually was led to it on craigslist by a forum member to whom I'm eternally grateful. I've got 3 restoration threads where all this is documented in the best detail i'm capable of:)
 

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Decide which dash you like, they changed about the same time as the engine and those two things are two of the big decisions you have to make regarding the year you want. In my case I decided I wanted a '71 w/the 1750 engine.

I'm still a newbie with the car but I have found that most of the parts are readily accessible because there are enough of these cars out there that used parts are available and new parts are being manufactured.

The forum is unbelievably helpful and I can't imagine trying to go at it without the help of the forum members.

As for starting conversations, yes it does, but outside those that know what they are looking at, most of the conversations it starts are pretty dumb.

Fun to drive should go without saying! IRS and rack and pinion would be nice but it is amazing what this car does with a solid axle and the steering gear it has. Particularly once they are rebuilt!

Have fun, this is a great car to mess about with and if you are careful your investment is relatively safe.
 
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Thanks again for the replies.
What price is too much for these models? I've seen a few listed in Hemmings for ~50k!!
What color is everyone after? What color does everyone NOT like?
Also, does anyone have a link to any highly modified GTVs?

Thanks!
Doug
 

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71 Berlina 74 GTV 17 Giulia Q4
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the first two questions are basically unanswerable. As for the third there are pleney of threads on the forum. Google will give you better search results than the search function here on the board. just start your search with "alfa fourm", and then whatever you are looking for such as "modified GTV"
 

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You might want to read this recent thread to get started: http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/gt-1965-1974/181612-1750-v-2000-a.html

A few other quick thoughts:
No matter what marque of car you buy, almost always a modified car will be worth less than a stock original car in the end (assuming similar condition). Modifications are personal choices and limit your buyers in the future.

Rust is your worst enemy with any GTV. Especially door sills.

Buy the best condition GTV you can afford.

Typically, the first and last year of a series of car will be the most valuable. In this case it would be '64 and '74 (USA) or '76 (Europe). However, GTVs are not your typical car. '69 and '70 are also highly desirable.

Color is a personal choice. However, "original color" cars should command a premium.

If you buy a restored GTV, make sure it comes with photos and receipts documenting the process. Conversely, if you restore a GTV, make sure you take lots of photos, etc.

Prices??? A nice #1- or 2+ condition GTV should be around $25-35K in the current market.
 

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My recommendation is YES.

These cars are an amazing mix of exotic / beautiful with insanely cheap mechanical parts and (relative to other classics) reliability. I'm reeling over the fact that ball joints for my girlfriend's base model '99 civic are about 5 times as much as the alfa. Ditto for all the other wear parts: brake discs, exhaust parts, gaskets... all available new, overnighted to your doorstep from multiple vendors. The 105 must also have the best ratio of never-see-them-on-the-road-to-number-of-parts-vendors.

Chrome and trim is sorta another story, but nothing is off the charts and so far as I know, just about everything is available if you pony up.

I own a '73 2000 because, as has been said, it's what I found and it had just a tiny bit of well contained (floor) rust. It also came painted. That takes 90% of the surprises out of a restoration. Yes, it sucked to find that my steering box was cracked (very common) but besides that, my FULL resto has turned up few surprises and so far is on budget. I paid $5k for a decent but not amazingly painted rolling shell with no parts missing. I'll probably be $15-17k into it when its done, but I will have touched EVERYTHING on the car in and out except I'm not opening the trans or diff. Doing every last drop of work myself except head work and flywheel lightening. That number includes what I've spend on tools, chemicals, etc. When I'm done I'll post my spreadsheet for all to wonder at.

As my tastes are developing I sometimes wish I had a 1750, but mostly wish I had a stepnose. i think for most people the choice is made by their budget and whether they think they'll use the car daily or seasonally vs car shows only.

I don't even have an operational car and I can already tell you i love this car, because when I go to my garage I get a huge rush and get excited to get down and dirty working on it.
 

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I think rust is the biggest issue - as mentioned above. Other than that - they really are fantastic cars to own and drive.
 

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Doing every last drop of work myself except head work and flywheel lightening.
This is the absolute key phrase within your stated expenditures. What do you figure you'd be into your car for had you paid a shop to do it :confused::eek:;).
 

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I can only imagine... easily add 10k ?

...going back to the ball joints on my gf's civic - the whole job (for TWO lower ball joints) was estimated at over $550. Time adds up quickly for every little job... as do parts when you're paying a markup on them.

This is the absolute key phrase within your stated expenditures. What do you figure you'd be into your car for had you paid a shop to do it :confused::eek:;).
 

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My S1 Nov '68 GTV has never had so much as a pin-hole of rust. You will find that most Italian cars built before '71 will be much less prone to rusting, as this is around the time the Italian car manufacturers starting using Russian steel in a quid-pro-quo deal for building car plants in Russia. The Russian steel was very poor quality - one of the prime reasons Lancia went bust.

Cheers,
Wazza.
::)
 

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Echo on the rust-free, "best car you can afford" mantra. Qualified inspection of any prospective purchases is cheap insurance, use this BB to find a shop local to the car you are considering. If possible, go see the car before the money hits the table to avoid surprises, lo-res photos and the red mist of car lust will make most cars look better than they are. As stock as possible, but don't rule out ones with sensible mechanical mod's as those can either help (improved performance and/or reliability) or be undone. The dream is finding the car that cost the previous owner purchased for $x, they "did it right" to the tune of $xxxx, and now are selling it for $xxx. Which is likely close to the proper valuation, unless they did the work themselves. Buy it completed, so you can drive it NOW, and not get upside-down on your investment. Unless, of course, your reason for buying it is to do the work yourself. I love my '69 with the original injection, but you will not go wrong with any of the years if the car is RIGHT. Good luck-
 

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What makes a 2litre better for your purposes? Power, plentiful and you don't have to worry about damaging the more desirable 1750 should a another driver think he's Fangio and turn in a little late :D
 
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