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Hi all, Just looking for advice and insights on mounting a Facet fuel pump on my '75 Spider as it came with a really awful, noisy unit which had been poorly mounted in the engine compartment adjacent to the Weber cards together with a small single in-line fuel filter. I have bought the Facet along with a Malpassi Filter King regulator.

Facet seem to recommend mounting the pump close to the fuel tank, so does anyone have a suggestion of where, and I understand it is best mounted vertically. Also any insights on the electrical supply for that would be appreciated. I am not being lazy, just looking for advice and best practice.

The regulator I plan to mount where the existing fuel pump is in the engine compartment, as that will give me an easy feed into the carbs.

Any other topics, suggestions, 'do's or don'ts' will be appreciated to save knuckles, temper or the swear box...

By the way, the original mechanical fuel pump is still on the engine, but I plan to remove that and buy a blanking plate for it. I assume there is no 'tricks' to doing that either.

Many thanks!
Mark
 

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What I did on my '67 race cars ( Duetto and GTV) was to mount the pump underneath the trunk and the regulator and gauge in the engine compartment. Seemed to work fine. Other racers had the pump and filters in the trunk. I always worried about leaks taking place inside vehicle versus outside.
 

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...By the way, the original mechanical fuel pump is still on the engine, but I plan to remove that and buy a blanking plate for it. I assume there is no 'tricks' to doing that either.
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IIRC, you really do not need to remove the mechanical pump in most cases. Even if the diaphragm is torn, it can still provide some help in pumping.
 

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Not an S2 but my '69 S1 - I fitted a new Facet fuel pump in the left side of the boot then made a cover (to stop any loose items in the boot from bashing into it) from black textured ABS sheet & trial-fitted.









I then covered it in some ribbed rubber sheet :




.
 

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Lightweight, that's really a neat installation.

The pump should be mounted close to the tank so it can easily suck fuel from the tank. Otherwise you could end up with problems with the system not self-priming if the level gets too low.

To avoid the transmission of noise, the pump should not be bolted directly to the body. Rubber mounts will provide some isolation. We kinda see them in the photo above.
 

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It is best to mount the pump with the intake below the bottom of the tank so that it is less likely to lose its prime.
 
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The instructions on the pump that I installed on my 1975 Goldwing was to mounted it under the gas tank let gravity do its work. You did a beautiful job in your insulation very proud work that was done. But in the end I believe the pump needs to be below the tank.


Ken Smith
 

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The Facet Gold Flo has like 18" of dry vertical lift, so as long as it's somewhere reasonable it'll work. Heck, the PO had a fuel pump mounted at the top right side of the engine on my '74 GTV when I got it and that worked fine. Not ideal, which is why I moved it, but it never gave issues.

I've got a Gold Flo mounted in a similar location to Neville's now: I used what I believe are the mounting holes for the original electric Spica pump. Andy's install is in pretty much the same place height-wise relative to the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
What I did on my '67 race cars ( Duetto and GTV) was to mount the pump underneath the trunk and the regulator and gauge in the engine compartment. Seemed to work fine. Other racers had the pump and filters in the trunk. I always worried about leaks taking place inside vehicle versus outside.
Thanks for that. I agree re trunk location sounding best, and seems to be reflected by other feedback too.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
IIRC, you really do not need to remove the mechanical pump in most cases. Even if the diaphragm is torn, it can still provide some help in pumping.
Thanks - I will rethink the mechanical pump - may end up trying to recommissioning the car with both options.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Not an S2 but my '69 S1 - I fitted a new Facet fuel pump in the left side of the boot then made a cover (to stop any loose items in the boot from bashing into it) from black textured ABS sheet & trial-fitted.









I then covered it in some ribbed rubber sheet :




.
My word, that is neat - looks great, and a good template for me to work to I think! I note you have a Facet Gold Flow - I was recommended a Fact Silver Top by a supplier (?) Any insights on that? By the way, where did you take the electrical feed from for the pump?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The instructions on the pump that I installed on my 1975 Goldwing was to mounted it under the gas tank let gravity do its work. You did a beautiful job in your insulation very proud work that was done. But in the end I believe the pump needs to be below the tank.


Ken Smith
Thanks for your feedback on this Ken
 

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Discussion Starter #15
My word, that is neat - looks great, and a good template for me to work to I think! I note you have a Facet Gold Flow - I was recommended a Fact Silver Top by a supplier (?) Any insights on that? By the way, where did you take the electrical feed from for the pump?
Sorry - I am incorrect about my pump type, I have indeed got a Facet Gold Flow, so identical. Many thanks again...
 

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Thanks - I will rethink the mechanical pump - may end up trying to recommissioning the car with both options.
Just take it out. There's no advantage to having it with the electric pump, and simplicity is your friend. There's an inexpensive blanking plate you can put in its place.

Electric pump in the back, then a Filter King regulator/filter up front, then to the carbs. That's all you need.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Just take it out. There's no advantage to having it with the electric pump, and simplicity is your friend. There's an inexpensive blanking plate you can put in its place.

Electric pump in the back, then a Filter King regulator/filter up front, then to the carbs. That's all you need.
Thanks Tom. We like simplicity...!
 

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Mechanical pumps have flap valves to alternate between suction from the tank and pressure to the carbs. If you push fuel into the pump with an electric pump, the intake valve will never close. Having both pump in seres is begging for trouble.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Mechanical pumps have flap valves to alternate between suction from the tank and pressure to the carbs. If you push fuel into the pump with an electric pump, the intake valve will never close. Having both pump in seres is begging for trouble.
Thanks for your input Yves
 
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