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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I know I've asked questions about this before but now I'm asking for definitive answers:

1) what tools are the best to use?
2) what trim needs to be cared for?
3) how to stop the glass breaking?
4) can one person do it by themselves without breaking the glass?

Thanks :)
 

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Hi,

I know I've asked questions about this before but now I'm asking for definitive answers:

1) what tools are the best to use?
2) what trim needs to be cared for?
3) how to stop the glass breaking?
4) can one person do it by themselves without breaking the glass?

Thanks :)
I used that same pnuematic gun with knife blades I posted info about earlier on your windshield removal question post.

Trim has same issue with inner tessth as front glass does.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I used that same pnuematic gun with knife blades I posted info about earlier on your windshield removal question post.

Trim has same issue with inner tessth as front glass does.
Steve, is the cost of the pnematic gun more than the cost of the glass?

Have heard of some people using heated wire to soften the bond instead. Sound viable?

Thanks,

Richard
 

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I did this successfully using a hack saw blade and a Stanley carpet knife as I did not want to invest in power tools I might only use once.
I am not sure it was worth it as rear windows are typically not damaged and do not crack.....did I just jinx myself again.

I did manage to save most of the beading as well as the toothed stuff.
You have to peel off the beading and cut the seal enough to be able to carefully push the glass out using gentle force....one wrong move and its over.

It is not an easy job.

Do you really have to do this?
I only did it to save the glass from going to the crusher with the totaled body and not sure I would ever do it again.

Ta,

Neville.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I did this successfully using a hack saw blade and a Stanley carpet knife as I did not want to invest in power tools I might only use once.
I am not sure it was worth it as rear windows are typically not damaged and do not crack.....did I just jinx myself again.

I did manage to save most of the beading as well as the toothed stuff.
You have to peel off the beading and cut the seal enough to be able to carefully push the glass out using gentle force....one wrong move and its over.

It is not an easy job.

Do you really have to do this?
I only did it to save the glass from going to the crusher with the totaled body and not sure I would ever do it again.

Ta,

Neville.
Hi,

like you I am only doing this to save the glass going to the crusher. If my rear screen ever gets broken I know it will be a pain and a half to source a replacement so seems silly to scrap a good one now. Especially as these are now becoming very rare cars.

Did you ever use yours?
 

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Be very careful, if you decide to remove a back window, not to scratch the heater lines on the inside. If scratched, they can quit working, and then you have to buy very expensive conductive paint to repair them.
 

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Steve, is the cost of the pnematic gun more than the cost of the glass?

Have heard of some people using heated wire to soften the bond instead. Sound viable?

Thanks,

Richard
Tool was cheap on ebay see my link in other post on windshield you posted.

As for heated wire idea the issue I found trying to use wire is the serrated like teeth on trim pieces catches wire.

Cost what cost if window not available when you need it what difference does it make?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Tool was cheap on ebay see my link in other post on windshield you posted.

Cost what cost if window not available when you need it what difference does it make?
Good point Steve,

thanks. You've inspired me to have a go. As soon as I have taken enough bravery pills. ;-)

Richard
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Here is Old Nero the donor after i got rear window out and a few other parts off of it:
http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/164-168-1991-1995/169239-requiem-lightweight-old-nero-alfa-164-organ-donor-obit.html
Steve,

I know I'm jumping ahead but given the scope for removing the rear screen can I ask why you think the front screen is so much harder? Is it mostly becuase it is a bigger sheet of glass or is there some other fundamental difference?

Thanks,

Richard
 

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The front glass is a totally different world of hurt.

In this case professional equipment is required and experience to some degree.

But it is more worthwhile to save the front glass if it is pit and scratch free.

I tried and failed in spite of taking great care about what I was doing.
Without warning or apparent reason the glass just cracked......
 

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Having tried to remove the front glass a couple months ago, I would agree that it's much harder. There's some oddities with the shape/depth of the upper corner area of the seal which I couldn't figure out (that's when mine cracked.)

Using an electric version of the tool Steve recommended, I successfully removed the rear glass. I even managed to preserve the metal trim. Not sure why I bothered, though...does anyone here need one? (If you're passing through the Atlanta area, stop by and it's yours!)
 

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Because you could I suspect is the reason as it was with me. I had hoped to save front one but even with longest blade I has I could not cut across the front bottom successfully. I think if I had had the dash out I might have been able to do it.
 
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