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I'm having issues removing the shock from the trailing arm- both the nuts on mine are 17mm and aligned. No stopping the shaft from turning with vice grips; it's polished and turns freely in the vice grips. Not cool...
 

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I had to use 2 vice grips for it to stop turning. And very tight. I didn't care much since I was throwing the old shocks away afterwards.
 

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Can you use the same technique (unbolting the shocks and pulling them out through the trunk) on a Giulia?

Cheers,
AA
 

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I did not have a tall stool to lift the rear of the car, so I used my floor jack, few blocks of wood (car was alreay on jackstands so I need height) and lifted by the shipping tie down found by the muffler.
Vin:

Glad it all worked out. But I have to say that your lift point makes me nervous. Yes, I know the differential was on stands and the car's rear springs were supporting some of the body weight. Still, I don't think the under-floor trunk sheetmetal is very strong. Frankly, nothing behind the axle is very strong.

I'd recommend lifting from the jack points. Yes, more force will be needed, but it's a stronger part of the body-frame.

 

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Laissez les bons temps rouler ! What started out as a simple trailing arm bushing install has spiraled out of control.

new trailing arms, new bushings, new shocks, new springs.

+1 KUDO's on this thread for the tips/tricks.

Originally, I was just going to be cheap and only replace rear bushes, then I realized the trailing arms looked like crap and I didn't want to fight the bushing removal. Then, I found the bottom shock nuts to be frozen like a deck cleat on the Titanic. Then.... I bought more tools. Because more tools always = more fun.

Shocks are loose now and will be pulled out still attached to the old trailing arms which I'll throw in the dumpster. New bushings are already pressed into new trailing arms and waiting patiently on the bench for other stuff to arrive next week. I think it'll be a breeze to install. Famous last words.
 

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quick question... I'm putting everything back together and having a heroic battle with the rear trailing arm bolt. As I slowly jack up the rear arm (compressing the spring), the arm simply doesn't 100% mate with the axle's bolt hole. I'm off probably 3mm -- which is obviously more than enough to prevent 'sliding' the bolt in.

Seems no matter how carefully I align things, or (yank) the axle forward, things still remain just a hair out of alignment preventing the bolt from going in. Yes, the front trailing arm bolt is in -- but 'sloppy loose' to allow movement. And yes, the spring is nicely seated in the cup of the trailing arm.

Is there a trick that works better? Should I ditch all the floor jack business and go borrow a spring compressor from the auto parts store? Anxious for some guidance.
 

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I replaced my trailing arm bushes only 3 weeks ago. Done it half a dozen times over the years on different 105's. Yes they can be slightly awkward at first, but mine went in after a little wiggle of the axle when the jack was at the right height.
Did you actually check that the bolt went through the new trailing arm bush before you tried to fit it ?
The clearance is quite tight, and you only need a small burr on the id of the bush sleeve for it not to go in, been there before, yes with new bushes.
I'd drop the jack and check that the bolt goes through the bush, from both sides.
 

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I replaced my trailing arm bushes only 3 weeks ago. Done it half a dozen times over the years on different 105's. Yes they can be slightly awkward at first, but mine went in after a little wiggle of the axle when the jack was at the right height.
Did you actually check that the bolt went through the new trailing arm bush before you tried to fit it ?
The clearance is quite tight, and you only need a small burr on the id of the bush sleeve for it not to go in, been there before, yes with new bushes.
I'd drop the jack and check that the bolt goes through the bush, from both sides.

Sigh.

Good advice and I feel better knowing it is finnicky. I've raised and lowered the jack a million times and confirmed the bolt does slide through like butter -- when there's clear access. The problem is when the trailing arm is jacked upwards, the hole on the bushing remains about 3-5mm out of alignment with the axle hole. I can push the axle forward, but it's simply not enough to line up the bolt holes. In fact, I think the spring itself is keeping the axle from being pushed any further forward; the two are basically/almost in contact.

I am super reluctant to start the bolt a few millimetres then use it to pry/lever the axle into position. That seems like a sure way to destroy the threads on an expensive bolt, and not really solve the problem.

  • should the front trailing arm be even 'more' than sloppy loose?
  • i'm doing this without the shock already installed. I can't imagine it would make bit of difference either way. right?
  • the car is mostly on a 2-post asymmetric lift, and I'm using the floor jack only for raising/lowering the trailing arm and compressing the spring
Any other tips/tricks would be massively appreciated.
 

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I've always done mine on the floor, and for whatever reason, the axle can move more freely than what you seem to be saying. Once I've got the right height with the trailing arm on the jack, it's just a case of wiggling the axle forward & backward to get the bolt to push through. Once you've got the threaded portion of the bolt into the sleeve you can usemolegrips on the bolt head to pry a little without hurting the thread, then once the non-threaded portion of the bolt is a quarter of an inch started, you can tap it home.
 

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Have you tried using a ‘drift’ from the inner side to do the locating, then push it back out from the outside as you insert the bolt? Something with a taper/point to assist with the initial inserting, and which you won’t mind tapping/forcing into place. I can’t remember how much swinging room there is, but the longer it is, the more you’ll be able to lever/tweak things. If that fails, you may well need to a little more slackening of things. Maybe the diff top mount might help.
 

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Big props to @GTA R for reminding me to not make simple tasks overly complex. Equally big props to @Ranz for suggesting a wee drift. Both springs are up and I'll drop the shocks through tomorrow.

1629620
 

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Have you tried using a ‘drift’ from the inner side to do the locating, then push it back out from the outside as you insert the bolt? Something with a taper/point to assist with the initial inserting, and which you won’t mind tapping/forcing into place.
Exactly what I was going to suggest. I use a large tapered drift and you can tap it in, and move things around a bit. Once you have the bolt started in the hole (don't worry, it WILL happen!) on one side you should be able to use the drift on the other side (as that probably won't be lined up). Then with the drift in place, and the holes fully aligned give the bolt head a good tap with a hammer and drive it through to knock the drift out.

If you don't have a drift, do you have a large enough old, sacrificial, bolt that you could sharpen the end, and hammer through? That lines up the holes. You then use your bolt to knock it back out. If you do this, make sure you put the first bolt in place with the head on the opposite side to where you want the real bolt head to end up.

EDIT: Sorry, just realised your picture shows you succeeded. Doh! Congratulations, good job!
 

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All done!

Dropped the car off the lift today and everything seems good. Ride right is noticeably higher than before, but I hope/expect this will settle down in a few hundred miles.

The only thing I'm not satisfied with is the handbrake cable mounting. The original RH arm had a drilled hole for the cable clamp, and while I can easily drill me new trailing arm the same way, it seems a pity to muck up such a nice new/shiny arm from Centerline. For now, a zip-tie works well enough as the next project awaits!
 
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