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Discussion Starter #1
The final chapter to our disassembly of the 91 Spider will be the removal of the suspension.

I assume we'll need a spring compressor to remove the front springs.

However, as the car is up on jack stands with the rear diff hanging, will we need to compress the springs to remove the diff?

Is there any order to rear diff removal we should follow?

Thanks - Dickson
 

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I do not believe you will need a spring compressor. (but if more learned minds say you do then listen to them). Put a jack under each trailing arm, lift the axle enough to support its weight then remove appropriate bolts and lower it down. I suspect the most difficult task will be undoing the axle restraining straps. Easiest will be to cut the straps then worry about getting the bolts that connect them to the body removed once the exle is out of the way.
 

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I do not believe you will need a spring compressor. Put a jack under each trailing arm, lift the axle enough to support its weight then remove appropriate bolts and lower it down. I suspect the most difficult task will be undoing the axle restraining straps. Easiest will be to cut the straps then worry about getting the bolts that connect them to the body removed once the axle is out of the way.
That's the way. AR flat rate book shows r/r rear springs at about 1 and 1/2 hours , Don't cut the straps but rather the bolts that connect the strap together ( if they are rusted beyond trying to unbolt them. If you are removing the whole diff assembly this is necessary and if just the springs it will not be) They are easy to replace. On a lift with the proper shop tools this job I have done this in just a few hours your personal results may vary If you are taking out it complete..Trailing arm at rear to remove springs ,brake feed line,straps and that castle nut and cotter pin on the top of diff move abit and lower it down
 

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If you search, there is a long thread (or more than one) regarding removal of front springs. I have done this many times, and use the "threaded rod" method as opposed to a spring compressor. It's easy and, in my opinion, not dangerous (as some believe).

The final chapter to our disassembly of the 91 Spider will be the removal of the suspension.

I assume we'll need a spring compressor to remove the front springs.

However, as the car is up on jack stands with the rear diff hanging, will we need to compress the springs to remove the diff?

Is there any order to rear diff removal we should follow?

Thanks - Dickson
 

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+1 for threaded rod method on the front pans.
Even better if you've got those box end wrenches that can ratchet.

Side note:
I'd not advice using powered tools on the rods/nuts as there is that vague chance the wrong bit can come loose before you notice it, and then you could be in for a real surprise. That and you have a much better feel for how things are going if you do it manually along with the much lower chance of overtorquing or stripping (and mabe even shearing) the rods.
 

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I agree entirely with George and Darren. The threaded rod method works very well-- a bit slow, but very satisfying. Plus, it'll save you the cost of a spring compressor that probably wouldn't work very well on an Alfa anyway. When I did my front springs, it cost me about twenty bucks for all of the "special tools" I needed, and that was after paying out the rear at a pricey local hardware store.

Here's a link that should help: Installing Front Spring (compression) - Alfa Romeo Bulletin Board & Forums

The advice already given for rear spring removal was great. The back springs should be even easier to deal with (if the limiting straps aren't stuck), and you won't need any special tools at all.


Evan
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the good advice guys.

We're definitely removing the rear, but got a case of "while we're at its" about the front suspension as well.

I'll check out the Threaded Rod method. Dickson
 

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No need for a spring compressor to remove the rear springs & differential.

- For one thing, unlike at the front, the rear shocks prevent the springs from flying out, since they are co-axial with the springs. The front suspension isn't designed that way.

- The rear springs are more than fully extended with the rear axle is at full droop. The much more powerful front springs still have a lot of stored energy even when the A arms reach their lower stops.

No real trick to removing the diff. It's heavy, so having a helper is nice. You do need to push it sideways to disengage it from the trunion arm, so make sure the chassis is securely supported. And don't forget to disconnect the brake flex line!
 

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71 Berlina 74 GTV 17 Giulia Q4
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If you don't need the old front springs cutting them with a torch is fun, quick, and you don't need threaded rods or spring compressors.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I don't need the front springs. Any reason to save them for other Alfisti? Otherwise, cutting them may be a good idea.

Would a metal blade on a sawzall work as well?
 

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Sawing can cause them to sproing a bit if there's any residual tension which can result in a piched blade at minimum and scare the piss out of you when it pops, or, a couple hunks of spring blasting out at worst when tension exceeds material size to hold it.
The nice thing about the torch is that they soften and compress before they cut through, so it's actually safer than sawing by a pretty wide margin.
 

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I don't need the front springs. Any reason to save them for other Alfisti? Otherwise, cutting them may be a good idea.

Would a metal blade on a sawzall work as well?
Reason to save? Unless they're performance springs or you plan to reuse them yourself, I'd say no. Rusty front springs are scrap value only and even if they're in good shape people don't want to pay the shipping. Never tried a sawzall on them, sounds worth a try if you don't have a torch. The threaded rod method typically takes me 30 - 40 min. per side.

Just read Darren's post about the sawzall. Sound reasoning.
 

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With as many miles as we talked about on the car, I'd cut them with a torch. I really wish you were closer I'd drive up and get that rear axel:)
 

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- The rear springs are more than fully extended with the rear axle is at full droop. The much more powerful front springs still have a lot of stored energy even when the A arms reach their lower stops.
I don't think this is always the case, especially with the limit straps in place. The limit straps are there to prevent the rear springs from unseating in the event of a major lift, so they do keep things under at least a little bit of tension.

Of the OP is worried, one thing I've found to be quite safe is to remove the rear springs by putting a floor jack under the front of a trailing arm, then lowering the front first.

Otherwise, a floor jack under the diff is usually sufficient.

There is a factory tool that works quite well, but I've only used it on a lift. I don't think it would work with the car on jack stands.

HTH,

bs
 
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