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Discussion Starter #1
Id like some advice please on jacking up the back (one side) of my 1964 Giulia SS using a trolley jack.
Ive read a few of the posts on this subject but couldnt find anything specific to my question.

Here's one picture to orientate you...you clearly see the "jacking point" for the car's jack to fit into if you were doing a tire change and used the supplied jack....

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Now Im looking "up" at the same area. (Remind me to wash the car). Ive marked 2 areas A and B. Those areas seem very substantial (famous last words)....could I place a piece of timber on either of those areas and raise the car with a trolley jack ? or maybe better still, make a little timber bridge piece across the hollow jacking X section and lift the car using both A&B? Obviously that area must be pretty substantial if AR are recommending you use the jack there....??

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ie. make something like this?

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with the 2 upper surfaces fitting in the area marked A and B, with a "snug" gap for the "jacking x section to fit into....

Thoughts please? Obviously if the car's rusted out, anything could happen...but in principal?
Ive read a lot of people raise the back of the car underneath the differential.....
thanks!
Roger
 

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Roger do not apply pressure to areas A & B as they are very thin sheet metal and in reality are just a cover for the box section above them where the jack point is mounted & they will dent badly & you cannot get above them to knock the dents out again, rather use a thin piece of soft timber under the middle of the rear axle and lift both back wheels at the same time, then put axle stands under the side tubes - I use a folded piece of carpeting on the top of the stands to protect the axle paint.

if you want to lift just one side, then either lift under the trailing arm bracket on the rear axle or if you want to raise the body then lift on the trailing arm bracket with the big bolt just ahead of the A&B areas

Unless you absolutely are 100% sure that the jacking points are structurally sound, rather don't lift on them as if there is any internal rust they will just be pushed up into the sills causing damage both internally & externally to the sills.

Ciao
Greig
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Very clear advice! Thanks so much Greig - really appreciate the help (and my car does too).
 

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Discussion Starter #4
And....when you say "....use a thin piece of soft timber under the middle of the rear axle and lift both back wheels at the same time...", youre talking about the differential.....yes?....which you have to be pretty careful with I would imagine....
thanks
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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Yes, jack the center of the differential. A hockey puck on your jack is great for this as you can lift without risk of damage.
 

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Push hard and live
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The differential bottom is quite strong. I generally use a small block of wood there in order to not scuff up the drain plug, but not because I'm worried about harming the diff.

Why not jack using the provided jack point(s)? Did I miss reading something? The bottom of the jack point is strong enough for your trolley. Again, if you're worried about scuffing it, toss a folded shop rag in between the trolley and jacking point.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yes, jack the center of the differential. A hockey puck on your jack is great for this as you can lift without risk of damage.
okay - got it. I'll get a hockey puck! thank you for the advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
The differential bottom is quite strong. I generally use a small block of wood there in order to not scuff up the drain plug, but not because I'm worried about harming the diff.

Why not jack using the provided jack point(s)? Did I miss reading something? The bottom of the jack point is strong enough for your trolley. Again, if you're worried about scuffing it, toss a folded shop rag in between the trolley and jacking point.
Thanks Don. I haven't tried going straight under the diff yet. At a cursory glance I was a little concerned about all the "fins" on the diff but clearly it works...

As to "jack points": I wasn't sure whether that 'open box section' at the jacking point was the right way to go with a trolley jack, as some people have posted concerns over those jack points (presumably if you have corrosion). Clearly, from what you say, it can work. My car doesnt seem to have corrosion in those areas....anyway, Greig kindly offered some other options.

Thanks for your comments.
 

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I have an off cut of moulded rubber skirting board, it's 22mm thick and about 100x100mm. Very dense and just slightly spongy on the surfaces so absolutely perfect for lifting up my cars in the middle of the differential.

The reason for a piece of soft wood is so that the drain plug area can sink into the wood and provide a positive location on the wood while the jack lifting 'cup' bites in from underneath - Hard wood will not allow either the jack or the diff plug to bite, so you create a potential for slippage. On that note, while lifting the rear axle, your trolley jack will need to roll forward as the angles change while the car rises up, so make sure that your jack is able to roll & not stuck on carpet or a bad floor surface or you could end up with your car slipping off the jack 😖

If necessary jack up in stages using timber under the wheels between lifting attempts - I cut up a 50mm scaffold plank into 700mm lengths and stack those as I need them. They also fit nicely under my jack to raise that up as needed. Use common sense & take safety precautions.

Ciao
Greig
 
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