Alfa Romeo Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've removed the gas tank from my 73 Spider (SPICA tank). Decided it was good enough to keep. Just a little surface rust on the inside. I am having it professionally cleaned, they use MEK, then hot tanked, and then sealed, POR 15 probably. Then he'll paint the outside radiator black. I've heard it's a good shop, been around for over 20 years. I got a good price, $220. Heck the MEK and POR 15 cost about $85, plus sitting in the hot tank overnight, and then painting it.

I wanted to keep the original tank if possible, and the reproduction tanks have to have slight modifications for the SPICA vents and outlet.

Questions:
I've decided to seal it, but that's a good question. To seal or not to seal? And if not, then what? I'm certain the original tank was not sealed. Maybe painted? Does anyone know how they were originally? And the vendors like IAP, Vicks, Centerline, probably don't sell their reproductions sealed.

Replacing the fuel filler hose, the straight piece about 2.5 inched long, 1.75 I.D. Is there a good reason to pay almost $50 at the Alfa vendors for this, when it's $16/foot at the local auto parts stores? And the clamps I removed from this where very heavy duty, steel banding held with a cotterpin-like roller. If original, I'll try and replace it. What is the NAME of that type of hose clamp? And where can I buy it? Otherwise, I'm sure a good quality hose clamp will work fine.

Thanks,
Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,071 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
705 Posts
Questions:
I've decided to seal it, but that's a good question. To seal or not to seal? And if not, then what? I'm certain the original tank was not sealed. ...
When I had my tank repaired and hot tanked, I had the same dilemma.

To seal or not to seal, that is the question.

Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, or to take arms against a sea of troubles, and by opposing; end them?...Okay, sorry, I got carried away.

I did lots of Googling at the time, and found lots of guys who said they had sealed their tanks, and eventually, the sealer started peeling off and gunking up their fuel lines. Once it starts you're screwed.

Original tanks were unsealed. The worst case scenario, is that you get a little rust, which you can delay by keeping your tank full. And your fuel filter can handle little particles of rust. It can't handle big flakes of peeling sealant.

I say go naked.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
All done

Got it all done. Turned out great. Here's my notes.

I think the tank really has to be sealed after this kind of professional stripping, with MEK. Just looking at the outside of the tank made me think it was rusting right in front of me.
tank after cleaning_edited-1.jpg

The radiator shop guy said it has to be sealed right away, and properly. Sounded like, not letting it pool too thick and let it sit there. Also you have to blow out all the vents with compressed air, several times while drying, keeping them open. Here's a good look inside.
inside sealed.jpg

I ended up priming and painting the tank. I used a neat gunmetal gray wheel paint from O'reily's Auto Parts.
It looks cool.
tank primed.jpg

The hitherto unknown term "terne coating" provided me some excellent Googling and reading. Thank you ljayr.

As far as filler neck hose, it's readily available at O'reily. One-foot is the shortest they sell. It fit perfectly. I bought "high torque" hose clamps because I hadn't seen those beefy original ones before, and I thought I should get something really strong in there. But honestly it's overkill, and five bucks each. I mean, all it does is connect to the filler hose. I only used them because I was too embarrassed to go back to O'reily and ask for my money back.

Picture all done and installed.
installed.jpg

I did learn that my tank had a little bump, dent, patch in the bottom. So that's another reason I'm glad I got it sealed.
Here's my opinion, for what it's worth. I would seal it if you do the MEK type of cleaning. That's a job for a shop anyway. MEK is very nasty. My shop had a disposal tank for that stuff. DIY tank cleaning with vinegar and other ****tails that you can find on the internet, probably don't remove the original "terne coating" or sealant or whatever, so you probably don't then need to re-seal.

I let it all dry completely. It's been installed and I've been driving for a few days. It works perfectly.
Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
705 Posts
Seal it or it will rust; especially with an ethanol blended fuel.
I'd rather have a couple rust particles in my gas than big chunks of sealant flaking off into it. I also add 4 oz. of Marvel Mystery Oil to every tank.

Do a quick Google for peeling or flaking gas tank sealant.

chopcult - por 15 tank sealer flaking off

TheSamba.com :: View topic - Por-15 Gas Tank Sealer

Some samples:


I used the por-15 gas tank sealer on a brand new tank about 2 years ago. The other day I noticed some bubbles in the sealer as I was filling it up and today I took out the tank to look around. The sealer is peeling off in sheets. Any suggestions on how to get all the sealer out? Or am I stuck with just buying a new tank?​

used it on an old tank for another project, I followed the directions best that I could and I was not happy with the result. There were many places where there was no adhesion.

I wouldn't want to fight with it, you'll be changing fuel filters and saying bad words! I just replaced it.

The instructions and web site say it is safe for ethanol blended fuels, but I bet it's not.​

Of course if you complain to the company they will just assure you that you didn't follow the instructions correctly Rolling Eyes​
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
895 Posts
I have cleaned the inside of "older" gas tanks with new screws and misc sized nuts and bolts with kerosene(not as flammable as gas), shook the assembly(not stirred) until the contents are reasonably clean. Yep, kinda back yard technology but does remove the majority of rust/debris. My experience is if the majority of the debris is removed a fuel filter will take care of the rest.

I would not "coat" the interior of a fuel tank due to the probability of future contamination.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,518 Posts
The metal of the tanks are treated before the tanks are made. Once they start rusting and you have it cleaned it will start rusting again as the MEK affects the factory treatment and obviously were its already rusted no longer has the treatment. If you don't line it it will rust again.

A lot of older liners flailed because they were not ethanol resistant.

Liners were never meant as a permeant fix. They will get you another 10 to 20 years. But the only ones I have seen hold up for that long are the ones done by professional radiator shops.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top