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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Alfa lovers,

I am thinking about restoring a 1976 alfetta sedan, I have always liked alfettas, before starting I wanna make sure that the parts are available here in the US. Are the parts readily available for Alfettas just like it is for spiders? I went on centerline.com but could not see parts like front grill or bumpers and etc. for alfetta sedan, do you happen to know where I can find parts for 76 alfetta sedan?
I Will appreciate your help.
 

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I have 3 78 alfa sport sedans and can tell you that the big alfa online stores do not stock up on alfetta sedan parts. Engine and brake parts can be spider parts even the brake booster with minor mod.
There are no exterior body parts anywhere except through private owners parting out a car. There are no interior parts available either through the online store except for maybe a steering wheel. Milano seats fit and can be found cheaply.
They may have brake rotors. They only have top hoses for the radiator but nobody has the long lower radiator hose but you can make one yourself.
You'll need the three drive shaft donuts I think you can get online. I've done a transmission swap with an 88 Milano that has worked well. Use the gtv 6 or milano suspension and shocks.
I wouldn't want to replace the big heavy 100 lb rubber bumpers but you can have mine if you want for cost of shipping. Most people try to find berlina bumpers instead but the owners of those old bumpers seem to think they're made of gold.
If you want to restore a 76 I would suggest you buy the most rust free model you can find, the find a cheap $400 76 rusty car for parts.
Alfa exchange in tracy,ca May have some parts too.
I you get the 76 alfetta sedan, you'll have a fun time of searching ebay both US and Europe, craigslist, alfabb, etc.
An you'll have a great, unique car that sets you aside from all the other alfa owners.
 

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I second that---Alfetta parts can be quite difficult to find. It's part of the fun...if you could mail order everything it would just be a Spider...

If you hunt enough, you can find parts. Sometimes I have luck with the European vendors. Body panels and interior plastics you're going to have to do custom or find used.

Given all of that--your best bet is to find one in very good condition and enjoy maintaining it. Finding one or two parts at a time is not as daunting, but a project car will eat your soul (and bank account).
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys for the info. Honestly I like both alfettas and spiders(series 2), there is an alfetta for sale locally for pretty cheap price, there are only 2 small rusty places, the paint is all faded and the interior is not clean either(the roof is all torn), Definitely needs new or repaired chairs, door panels (which wll be hard to find), and etc. The only thing that is good is the engine which is in a very good condition and running. So my question is if I get it this alfetta for like 2k, will I be able to make it look and function decently if I put 10k in it? (that is how much I wanna budget for the project) my 10K includes new decent paint, interior restoration and maybe some engine work and like new shocks and stuff.

or I should just look for a clean spider?
 

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I have a 76. Not the later sports sedan.

Body panels can be had, new... In Europe. Ebay in italy and germany have them.

Engine + mechanical + electrical can also be had readily.

Bushings for Dedion and suspension readily available.

Interior bits, specifically interior cabin stuff, doorcards, dash, center console (i have an nos one on the shelf) can be quite hard to find, but if you watch like a hawk, as i do, they do come up.

You have to know where to look. Again, certain smaller vendors in italy get this stuff in on occasion.

Some bearings can prove difficult. Driveshafts themselves are very hard to source but rubber donuts are easy to get. Everything under the hood is easy to find... Everything. Window glass is hard to find. Brake parts are easy, carbs are easy, rear parcel shelf - never have seen them. Door cards are oute, but in heinous colors. And often only one or two. Interior wood trim, i have nos, but very hard to come by. Tire options are very limited. Headlight, brake lamps, directionals... Plentiful. I am 15k into mine, and i still need paint. I can help you with where to find stuff. Mechanically and suspension, brakes, electrical, my car is like new and is an absolute pleasure to drive.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Rob, for your detailed information, very helpful. As i understood you also have a 1976 alfetta sedan. There is one on ebay currently which happens to be in my neighborhood. So based on your info it is not possible to have it restored for around 10k. I like the car but there are other classic cars that I like equally and are in the same price range , so I don't know if I should go for an alfetta and spend that much on it. But I know restoring it will be very fun thing to do and the end result is very enjoyable.
 

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For $10k, you can buy a very nice one and just enjoy it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
That is why I am not very sure, There is one for sale locally. I can get it for 2k. the engine runs good but interior and exterior needs a lot of work, a decent paint itself will cost maybe 3 to 4k and maybe another 2k interior work and maybe another 2 k on mechanical parts and everything. You are right for 10k I can get a nice one which I will be able to resale for a good value too some day if I decide to sell but the enjoyment of brining an alfa back to life and its full health is what making me feel like I wanna get that alfetta but again I am not sure. If the color was red, blue, or white or something common or sporty I would definitely get it, but this one is burgundy and changing the color of the entire car is very costly I belive. What do you suggest? should I get it and lightly restore it or I should save that money and get a clean alfetta or a spider?
 

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I say restore!

I started a resto/track upgrade on my Alfetta Sedan 1976 in 2006 and I am still working on it but its been a driving restoration so i´ve driven it every summer since the start. It is a fantastic journey to make and a good deed of enormous proportions to save a sedan for future generations!

Here is my project thread, its in Swedish but there are tons of pictures and I am sure Google will do a decent translation!

AlfaPower - Björnbusens Projekt Alfetta Autodelta 2013 (Alfetta 1,8 1976) - Powered by XMB 1.9.11
 

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ou may be underestimating the cost of paint & rust repair. Believe me, ALL of these cars have rust somewhere, you just might not be able to see it. But you'll have to take care of it before you paint.

The paint job on my GTV6 (see my other thread for details) cost over $10k. That included some very minor rust repair, strip to bare metal, re-seal, prime and paint.

A $3-$4k paint job will look ok and last 5 years max before it starts to look tired. A good paint job will look awesome and last 30 years. I've done it both ways, so I speak from experience. You will ultimately not be happy with any paint job under $5k--it's a waste of money. (this is MY opinion--I'm sure some people out there are perfectly happy with cheap paint jobs, but I don't think they do these cars justice, and frankly it only helps propagate the notion that old Alfas are beaters and not true classics)

Having said that, burgundy Alfettas look AWESOME when they are painted and all of the chrome bits are shined up nicely. It's a signature color for the period, same as the cream-butter color that is on my Alfetta.

Interior work will also probably cost you more than you think. Seats re-done in vinyl will run $1k, twice that if you do leather. Carpet sets are no longer available, so you'll have to have that custom made if the carpet has faded (most of them have, especially on the rear shelf). Figure another $500-$1000. Dashboards are also no longer available, and there is no dash cap either. To make it look nice, you'll have to take it out and send it to Just Dashes, where they will strip the old covering off and re-create the dash. Results are outstanding, but it will cost around $1500, not including labor to remove and re-install the dash.

If any of the other small bits inside the car need attention, those are also hard to find and expensive.

I'm not trying to discourage you, but I hope you can understand that the cost of a decent restoration will run much more than you think. I see too many Alfas which were bought with the same intent, thinking that it would only cost a few thousand to 'restore', and then reality sets in and the same car goes back up for sale with a crappy paint job, seats that don't match and a hacked together dashboard. They spend $10k on a $2k car, and end up selling it for $3k after it languishes for a year. Don't waste your money!

From the condition you describe the car, I would plan on spending at least $15k to get it to where you want it.

Just my advice--I did a rolling restoration of a Spider the low-cost way. I bought the car for $4500, spent well over $10k on it over 8 years, and sold the car for $6500.

My Alfetta, on the other hand, was in great shape when I bought it, and I've spent all of my time and money making it more perfect, and if I sold it, I would probably get a nice price out of it (certainly not all that I put in, but probably double what I paid for it).

The GTV6 that I am working on now was a true barn find, with 39k miles on it, but it had been stored for a very long time and needed help. It's worth spending $20k on, because it will be very desirable when I am done, and might even sell for that amount with the right audience (not that I ever intend to sell it, but life happens and sometimes you need to sell stuff).

Sorry for the long post--restoring cars is great fun, and you never really get out of it financially what you put in, but there are ways to maximize the return while still having fun doing it. Just my advice, after having been there and done that a few times. YMMV.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks very much for your detailed info about restoration. I have never restored a car and thats probably why I underestimate the cost of everything.
You did not discourage me but you told me the truth and that helps. I think i should forget about restoring an alfa (at least for now) and just find a clean alfetta or a series 2 spider and just drive it and enjoy maintaining it. I think I will be able to find a clean one if I am willing to pay around 10k.
Honestly, If i were to spend on the restoration of a car well over its resale value, I would just keep the car but before that I should make sure that I really love that car. I like alfettas but I am not crazy about them so I guess spending that much on an alfetta is not a good choice for me. But yeah bringing an Alfa back to life is a great fun no matter which model it is.
 

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Q#1 why are you limiting yourself to a 76? The later Sport Sedan(78-79) is very similar in appearance (front clip is slightly different) but you avoid several LARGE Alfetta problems. The Sport Sedan takes driveshaft donuts that are both available and affordable. 75/76 Alfettas driveshaft donuts were subject to a factory recall in 76.The 75-76 donuts are much harder to find and are more expensive. The Sport Sedan also uses the later style (140mm bolt center) drive shaft support that is available and affordable. 75/76 Alfetta take a125mm driveshaft support that I don't think is available.
78/79 Sport Sedans also benefit from having rubber gasketed windshields and hatches. 75-77 sedans use glue-in windshield and hatch and these two areas are VERY prone to rust and expensive to repair.
This is an appropriate place to put in a plug for Highwood Alfa in England. Highwood has the broadest selection of Alfetta specific(116 series) parts than any other vendor I know of. The owner,Chris Sweetapple, is also very knowledgeable about Alfettas.
Unless the 76 model year sedan is exempt from emissions I'd avoid a 76 and look for the best 78/79 you can find. Once you repair the shift linkage ,Alfetta sedans are great drivers. If you're patient, really good Alfettas turn up periodically on the BB,Craigslist and on Ebay
Q#2 have you considered an Alfetta coupe? They are far more plentiful than the sedans.The coupe design (by Giugiaro) won awards....and the same rules apply-78/79 coupes are better than the 75-77 version.
Last point-restorations always cost more time and money than you planned for when you started. Buy the best example you can afford.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I am not limiting myself to a 76, it is because I found a 76 on ebay which happens to be 15 minutes away from my house. Here is the link.

Alfa Romeo Other Sport Sedan | eBay

the bid is $2500 so far, now I definitely know that I don't get this car because I won't pay more than 2k for it since it has a lot of work to do and also it is not exempted from smog in California because its a 76, it was 75 or older it would be exempted.
GTVs are cool but not my favorite, if i don't get an alfetta sedan I will get a series 2 spider instead. I like the compact models more.
I will just save my money for a clean alfetta sedan (round headlights) or a spider.
 

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Hi Jim! You are right as well as wrong! :smile2:

There may be series one Alfettas made in 1976 but there are also series two Alfettas from the same year. The series on has many upsides like a better interior with black instruments instead of blue as well as actual wood in the interior detailing. But it also has the smaller driveshaft with aluminium donuts as you say. I think the series one are the crown of the alfetta series. But a series two is a bit easier when it comes to some of the parts.

The sedan that was introduced in -77 the long body, is another car altogether in my view and not as collectible.

When it comes two glue-in windshields it seems AlfaRomeo had problems making up their minds. I´ve had five Alfettas so far from 72-84 and not one of the earliest four had had a glued in windscreen. But thats AR for you I guess! :smile2:

So Arazito, my two cents is that if you want a challenge go for a series one 1972-1975-ish otherwise a series two 1975-1977-ish.

And if you are a bit new to this, even if you want a project, don´t by the cheapest one out there. Find one in decent nick rust- and paintwise and you will save your self at least some of the trouble! :)

Put Do get an Alfetta, they are great little cars!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I like the front girl of the series one more but doesnt matter I like both series one and 2. The one that I have my eye on (I put the link in my previous message) is mechanically ok but it definitely needs paint and interior work, it s a 76 so I have to deal with smog check, the bid is at $2500, should I go for this one? The owner says there are 2 parts that have rust but how do I check for rust in some other places? how do you know there is no rust in the tank?

Alfa Romeo Other Sport Sedan | eBay
 

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I like the front girl of the series one more but doesnt matter I like both series one and 2. The one that I have my eye on (I put the link in my previous message) is mechanically ok but it definitely needs paint and interior work, it s a 76 so I have to deal with smog check, the bid is at $2500, should I go for this one? The owner says there are 2 parts that have rust but how do I check for rust in some other places? how do you know there is no rust in the tank?

Alfa Romeo Other Sport Sedan | eBay
Arazito, I contemplated this car too. It's been for sale for quite some time but did not find a local buyer. There are 2 things that are going against this car 1) bi-annual smog inspection, 2) body condition. The first one is a PIA for sure. The second can run into $3-$4k easily - with body work, it's always one thing leads into another. I strongly suspect that reason hasn't sold yet is due to passing smog. At $1k, this car would make sense, at $2500 it should be indeed mechanically sound in every aspect - engine, trans, brakes, steering, suspension while easily passing smog.

I second Bjornbusen's advice - get a nice one for $5-$6k - you will be further ahead than getting into a project, especially at about 50% of a good car.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Tirefriar, Yeah same here, but I was not sure if I should get it or not. the fact that it's a 76 is a bummer since we live in CA, and honestly I like this body of Alfetta and I believe they come up pretty rarely (am I correct?) so thats why I was like I will go for this one and put some money in it to make it better but I guess should wait for a decent one to come up.
It has some oil leakage, and most probably some other mechanical parts should be replaced, 3-4k paint and probably another 2k interior work(this is assuming the seats are in good condition, there are covers on them so you can't really tell), donno how much rust it has on it, but if I had the skill and the place to take care of the rusty spots and paint it myself I would definitely get it, therefore I should wait for a clean one to come up.
I am pretty new, but based on your experience, how often do you see an Alfetta sedan (72-77) for sale in the US?
I like the look of them once you put some fat wheels on it and lower it.
 

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I bet if you looked in italy you could grab a decent candidate that wouldn't need too much, and then import it. There are only half a dozen in the uk.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
The prices for these classic alfas in italy are higher than here in the US. and plus the fees for importation and the duties here will most probably take the price to 15k+ , I won't get this Alfa but I will contact the owner to keep track of where it goes and where her new home is because the new owner will probably do some work on it and maybe sell it one day, you never know.
 

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Okay this is where your project stops making any sense You say you want to restore a rare,39 year old car on a tight budget. If that's the case why lower it and install fat wheels???? Even assuming you can find 4 x 98 bolt pattern fat wheels (that will set you back $1000 or more) you already have a set of Alfa correct alloy wheels on the car.Then you have to buy expensive and overly stiff fat tires for your fat wheels that probably won't clear the fender wells(which were designed to take 185/70 x 14 wheels + 14 x 51/2 wheels.)
75-77 Alfetta sedans show up on the BB and on Ebay about 6-10 times per year. Given your location and proximity to Arizona and New Mexico you should also see low-rust Alfettas turn up on the various Craiglists .
Because of your emission laws you can't find or build a fast Alfetta in California.You are limited by emissions to a 2750 pound car with 115 hp Fat wheels and tires will only screw up the Alfetta's greatest assets-50/50 weight distribution and excellent handling AND SLOW IT DOWN. Good luck and happy motoring
 
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