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AR Museum - Site might not be visible on Firefox

Typically, the design of the site for AR Museum comments is beautiful but the function leaves something to be desired. Probably because of whatever settings you can have on Firefox, text might not be visible against the gray background. If that happens try Internet Explorer.

Incidentally I posted some pictures of my visit several years ago to the AR Museum and the sadly crumbling Arese factory around it on the Yahoo 750-101 forum.
 

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Protest the Destruction of the Alfa Museum

Typically, the design of the site for AR Museum comments is beautiful but the function leaves something to be desired. Probably because of whatever settings you can have on Firefox, text might not be visible against the gray background. If that happens try Internet Explorer.

Incidentally I posted some pictures of my visit several years ago to the AR Museum and the sadly crumbling Arese factory around it on the Yahoo 750-101 forum.
See this link for detailed instructions from Tom Lesko, AONE chapter, on how to use the website to post a comment; 400 posted as of this a.m.

Link: http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/giulietta-giulia-1954-65/175676-holding-heritage.html#post967808
 

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I wonder how many people on this board have done the two following things:

1. Go to Italy
2. Visit the Alfa museum

They are closing it down because the revenue that the museum generates isn't enough to justify keeping it open. Protesting is good and it's everybody's right in the free world but money is the thing that really decides these sort of things.

Good luck.
 

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I went to the museum in 65 and 66. I have a picture of myself sitting in Fangio's 159. How much would someone pay today for a chance at that picture? I spent the day with the head of PR in 1966. I had thought that I would be with a group taking a tour. The workers were on strike that day. Imagine that! I had to spend the day with Mr. Saccomani. Lunch. Etc. . Absolutly fabulous to a 19-20 year old Alfisti! Totally free back then. I already owned my first Alfa, a 58 750 Spider Veloce. I still own it. Unfortunately, Fiat does not care about our History. Only the bottom line. If they truly promoted it, the musuem would do much bettter financially.
 

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Protest the Destruction of the Alfa Museum

I went to the museum in 65 and 66. I have a picture of myself sitting in Fangio's 159. How much would someone pay today for a chance at that picture? I spent the day with the head of PR in 1966. I had thought that I would be with a group taking a tour. The workers were on strike that day. Imagine that! I had to spend the day with Mr. Saccomani. Lunch. Etc. . Absolutly fabulous to a 19-20 year old Alfisti! Totally free back then. I already owned my first Alfa, a 58 750 Spider Veloce. I still own it. Unfortunately, Fiat does not care about our History. Only the bottom line. If they truly promoted it, the musuem would do much bettter financially.
Pat made several trips to the museum, both for pleasure and research. It was not out of the way for him when he lived in Italy; a little more of a trip from the states. I also have a two large pictures, poster size, of Pat sitting in the 159 and one other car at the museum, the one that had the tail dented at Laguna Seca during unloading at the Historics in the 80s.

If the museum closes and is demolished, I wonder what the 100s of pictures I have of the museum will be worth?

Unfortunately, in this economic climate only the bottom line counts -- throw history out the window. There is a lawsuit going to court in Virginia over Wal-Mart wanting to build on land that was used as part of the civil war hospital encampment. Unfortunately, it sits outside the National Park boundaries and there are other retail establishments in the area, but not as close.
 

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I wonder how many people on this board have done the two following things:

1. Go to Italy
2. Visit the Alfa museum
I have been to Italy and even made a stop in Milan years ago. But had no way of getting to the museum. Plus that was at a time when the museum seemed like a difficult place to get to and you couldnt really just show up at the gates.
 

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I wonder how many people on this board have done the two following things:

1. Go to Italy
2. Visit the Alfa museum

They are closing it down because the revenue that the museum generates isn't enough to justify keeping it open. Protesting is good and it's everybody's right in the free world but money is the thing that really decides these sort of things.

Good luck.
What revenue? Unless things have changed, when I went to the museum back in 1999 there was no admission charge. Oh, and we have been to Italy several times as have quite a few members of the bb...
 

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Several years ago I made a trip to Turin on business, and took advantage of the chance to tour Northern Italy. We went to both the Alfa museum and the Ferrari museum. The Alfa museum was astonishing - free, and completely off the beaten path. Like many who have gone we were the only ones there, literally. There wasn't even a security guard. I could easily have pried a souvenir off of a multi-million dollar piece of history. As incredible as the experience was, it's easy to see why that wasn't really a sustainable situation for Fiat. I would gladly have bought a ticket, a souvenir, whatever but that wasn't an option.

The Ferrari museum, on the other hand, was as commercial as one of the Ferrari stores in a high end mall. The tickets were pricey, the presentation was slick, and the place was packed. And of course, well-heeled Tifosi were welcome to spend ungodly amounts of money at the gift shop as well. As much as I loved Arese, and I hate to say this, I think the only real option is for Alfa to open a commercially viable museum in a more tourist friendly area of Milan or Turin along the lines of the Ferrari museum. I'd rather see them create a for-charge museum and keep the cars on display then mothball the collection in a warehouse somewhere. Or worse - sell them to the highest bidder.

Selfishly, I'd love to see the current museum in Arese remain a hidden jewel, but I don't think there's any way that situation works long term.

-Jason
 

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The plan was to move the entire collection to Turin. In my opinion, this would have been a good move, given the traffic generated by the newly refurbished Automobile Museum in Turin. The Minister for Cultural, passed a rule that the Alfa Collection shall remain in Arese and that none of its cars can be sold.
For those who read Italian, this is the press release:


Il Museo Alfa Romeo non verrà spostato dall’ex Centro Direzionale della Casa ad Arese. Su iniziativa del sindaco, mesi fa era stata inoltrata una richiesta al Ministero dei Beni Culturali perché ponesse un vincolo tra l’istituzione e il centro che la ospita. Il ministero l’ha accolta e ha comunicato ufficialmente a Fiat e comune che tutto resterà lì dov’è.

Tra le tante conseguenze del provvedimento ministeriale, una, molto importante, è che la collezione, pur restando di proprietà Fiat, non potrà essere smembrata né spostata: la traslazione a Torino, ipotizzata di tanto in tanto nel recente passato, non ci sarà. Almeno una piccola scheggia di passato dunque, rimane com’era…


Here is the translation:


The Alfa Romeo Museum will not be moved from the former Alfa Romeo Directional Center in Arese. By initiative of the mayor, a few months ago a request was forwarded to the Ministry of the Cultural Assets, claiming that there was a tie between the museum and the building that houses it. The request was accepted officially by the ministry and it was communicated to Fiat and to the municipality that everything will remain where it is now. One of the many consequences of the ministerial provision, a very important one, is that the collection, which remains the property of FIAT, cannot be broken up or moved: the move to Turin, which had been planned, will not take place. At least a small chip of the old Alfa Romeo therefore, remains as it was…
 

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They are closing it down because the revenue that the museum generates isn't enough to justify keeping it open. Protesting is good and it's everybody's right in the free world but money is the thing that really decides these sort of things.
OK, so how can I join the museum? How can I buy museum merchandise? How can I make a donation?

If money is the issue the museum needs to figure out how to raise some.

Why is Ferrari so market savvy but Alfa so bumbling? (Ferrari's single biggest source of income is Ferrari logo mechandise. Yes, T-shirts make more money for them than cars.)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The plan was to move the entire collection to Turin ...
Any plan can be altered ... the following quote from Oliver Collins explains FIAT's new plan - get the Ministero dei Beni Culturali to modify the ruling and allow destruction of the museum building (and the adjacent offices) ... the last physical reminders of Alfa Romeo as an entity.
Once destroyed, no amount of comments or wailing will return them.

Dear Alfisti,

I have just been advised of the unfortunate news that our beloved Alfa Romeo Museum in Arese is once again in danger of being dismantled, notwithstanding the ruling by the Italian Ministry of Culture to keep the Museum and it’s cars and documents intact.

The current FIAT ownership is putting huge pressure on the Ministry in Rome to have this ruling modified. The current ownership's final goal is not only to sell some of the cars, but also to sell the whole structure and finally move the remaining cars to Turin and lock them in a warehouse, as it has already been done with the Lancia Museum.

We are asking you to show your support for maintaining what is every Alfisti's spiritual "home", the Alfa Romeo Museum in Arese. Built and opened on December 18th, 1976 by the Alfa President at that time, Giuseppe Luraghi. The Alfa Romeo Museum is the essence of the Brand, it tells the story of its great victories, its great technological innovations, and its unforgettable cars.

Unfortunately there is not much time. At the end of January 2011 the Italian Ministry of Culture will evaluate the request to modify it’s ruling, as requested by the current ownership, and will issue a ministerial decree regarding the protection of the Alfa Romeo Museum in Arese. This will be after examining the arguments of the supporters of this initiative against the objections by the current Alfa owners.
 

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I visited the Alfa Museum about 15 years ago. Pretty strange place. The guards just point toward the direction and my wife and I were there alone. Awesome Cars and history. Spent 3 hours there. Got me interested in colecting more models. Sad to here this.
 

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This is really sad. I've been to the Alfa Museum seven times, and it is a marvelous place. But, as others have emphasized, it is off the beaten path and thus underutilized. Some years ago there was talk of the Museum being relocated to Milan, and I doubt if that is in the current plan. Selling/storing the cars would be a travesty.
 

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This is really sad. I've been to the Alfa Museum seven times, and it is a marvelous place. But, as others have emphasized, it is off the beaten path and thus underutilized. Some years ago there was talk of the Museum being relocated to Milan, and I doubt if that is in the current plan. Selling/storing the cars would be a travesty.
They should move them to the newly refurbished Auto Museum in Turin.
 
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