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Still plugging away at someone else's Weber-clone conversion. DPO was a rubber hose fan. Rubber fuel line comes in at the bulkhead, up to the front of the engine where the fuel pressure regulator is mounted, then back in a huge loop that leads back to the rear carb, where the "T" fitting is mounted. I guess it didn't occur to him to put the "T" on the front carb and the single inlet on the rear carb. :001_unsure:

I'd like to fix this, and I'm uneasy about so much rubber fuel line. What was on there stock? Hose, or metal line?
 

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This may sound strange to you but the solution you suggest isn't all that easy.

I know it makes sense to put the "splitter" in line, but due to the machining of the Dellorto carbs fuel inputs (and I remember my Webers were similar) you have to either: a) machine the fuel inlets so they fit; b) change the accellerator linkages around between the carbs; c) put in a big loop like you describe.

My first fix involved replacing all the rubber hose I could with copper pipe. This is easy to bend and can be made to look acceptable. It worked but I still had a big loop.

My latest fix involved machining a set of fuel inputs (the little metal pipes bolted onto the carbs) so they are interchangeable. I like option b best as it is neatest and doesn't involve machine work, and when I have to change the bearings on my carbs I will restore the stock fuel intakes and exchange the accellerator linkages.

My only concern (other than aesthetics) is that the bent fuel line goes over the distributor. Having suffered a catastrophic engine fire in a Ford Anglia due to a fuel line failure over the distributor I do everything in my power to keep sparky stuff away from burny stuff...

Enjoy the job. It is fun to play on carbs when they play along.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
On these, swapping inlets is much simpler. The inlet is a banjo-style bolt that is attached from the top.



Once I get them reversed, I may just run rubber lines in the engine bay.
 

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On these, swapping inlets is much simpler. The inlet is a banjo-style bolt that is attached from the top.



Once I get them reversed, I may just run rubber lines in the engine bay.
all manner of suppliers make " aeoquip " style banjos kits for these that use " push lok ' non braided line. henry's engineering, earls , everybody , really . the push lock stuff is available in colors and good for 200 f and 150 psi. they make for a nice clean installation. no hose clamps etc.
 

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A slight tangent on fuel lines - Legomedic -

You mention using copper tubing for fuel line. The conventional wisdom is that copper is an unacceptable choice for gasoline fuel line for a couple of reasons:

First, it gums up your gas.

...Copper interferes significantly in the gum content of gasoline, because it is a catalyst of radicalar oxidation reactions and it accelerates peroxidation. Therefore, this metal must be avoided in any metal alloy that comes into contact with gasoline in the feeding system of engines." http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ef049849h

Next, it seems that copper is prone to developing cracks with consequent leaks if flexed or vibrated:

Pure copper tubing work-hardens and becomes very, very brittle- especially at flare fittings. Under the cyclical loadings seen from brake applications, and in the presence of moisture (and possibly high concentrations of chlorides, if you live in a road salt area), they will almost certainly fail. They will tend to crack and fail right at the flare, generally with little or no warning.


Copper pipe and fuel, why not | www.MPGResearch.com

FWIW
 

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Discussion Starter #6
...Copper interferes significantly in the gum content of gasoline, because it is a catalyst of radicalar oxidation reactions and it accelerates peroxidation. Therefore, this metal must be avoided in any metal alloy that comes into contact with gasoline in the feeding system of engines."


Pshaw. I have a magnet on my fuel line that re-aligns the fuel molecules, counteracting the peroxidation and improving my fuel mileage while boosting my HP by 20%!!:laugh:

I just wish they made a side-draft turbolator for my carbs!
 

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Still plugging away at someone else's Weber-clone conversion. DPO was a rubber hose fan. Rubber fuel line comes in at the bulkhead, up to the front of the engine where the fuel pressure regulator is mounted, then back in a huge loop that leads back to the rear carb, where the "T" fitting is mounted. I guess it didn't occur to him to put the "T" on the front carb and the single inlet on the rear carb. :001_unsure:

I'd like to fix this, and I'm uneasy about so much rubber fuel line. What was on there stock? Hose, or metal line?
Rubber fuel line was stock in the engine bay - hard lines to the rear. As long as it is fuel rated there should not be an issue. You can certainly swap the T fitting to the front carb and avoid the extra length but I doubt you would find an optional difference.

You do have a filter in this system, correct?
 

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Especially with the fuel particles re-aligned....:laugh:
 

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Well you learn something new every day. Thanks a lot Lokki.

Now I wonder if that's why my Anglia went poof in a puff of smoke and flame twenty years ago. I had copper pipes in there as well and the fire was spectacular.

I have since changed my setup so no worries there.

It may also be that the fuel particles were not properly aligned... either that or the high pressure electric fuel pump. Nah, it must have been the particles.
 
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