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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking to buy a GT Junior from a private seller in The Netherlands. I have a basic understanding of the process on my receiving end on the U.S. regarding shipping, customs, and forms like the HS-7 and 3520-1 for NHTSA and EPA (it meets the 25-year rule and I'm importing to the state of Washington so there should be no issues there), respectively because I did this with a Giulia Super back in 2007. But, last time the seller was familiar with the process for an international sale and the car was registered in Belgium so I wasn't involved in that part of it.

This time, I'd like to help this seller out with what needs to be done on their end to be able to sell and export the car to me since they've never done this. I see there is some deregistration process and then there are export documents that need to be prepared. Does anyone have any experience with this process, specifically for The Netherlands (I believe it's even more complicated and slow for Italy), in order to help me help the seller? Maybe I should be looking to hire some kind of agent in The Netherlands to help with this part of the process? I wouldn't mind paying a fee if there is some real work and expertise involved so any references on who I might contact is also appreciated.

Thanks,
Gary
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thanks for the belated reply solidol! Actually within a couple weeks of posting this last summer I discovered an incredibly nice 1974 BMW 2002tii out of Calgary, Alberta and that's what I ended up purchasing (just updated my signature to reflect that even though I know this is an Alfa board--I promote Alfas all the time on the 2002 board so I think that's fair). Exchange rates between U.S. and Canadian dollars were actually more favorable back then than USD vs. Euro. I crossed the border to retrieve the car myself in later August just a week after Canada opened up the border again to vaccinated U.S. citizens. So I did go through customs paperwork when crossing back into the U.S. again and I didn't even have to pay the normal duty (4% of the bill of sale price or around there) for bringing a 25+ year old car into the U.S. for the first time. I think that was a combination of this tii actually being a U.S. spec example including the FMVSS compliance sticker even though it was originally imported to Canada, the border agents just deciding to give me a break since I was doing this myself rather than through a broker, and then just that they were glad to see people again and have something to do as the border had been closed well over a year.

So now for a few pre-retirement years I've got both my '73 Giulia Super and this '74 2002tii to enjoy and keep me occupied. Plus, I can start considering a downsize to a single older European sports sedan/coupe once I do get closer to retirement--Giulietta Sprint, Lancia Fulvia HF, ...? Right now is actually a great time to be buying out of Europe although I'm not in the market. The exchange rate is incredibly favorable to those in the U.S. and it's like a 20% off sale right now vs. when I was looking a year ago.

-Gary
 

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Sorry to hijack this thread, but it seems to be the best place to get the desired information.

Fact is, I am contemplating selling a 35 year old Alfa from Montreal to the US. Since I am located close to the US border, to facilitate the importation to the US, I am considering the merits of driving the car over the border and having the sale registered state of New York or Vermont. Would this be doable? Are there any legal consequences?
Thanks, James
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi James,

I am suspecting this can only be done by the buyer of the car. For most states this is not an issue although I know there are tricks that residents in "problem states" like California use like setting up an LLC that lets them title a car in a state they don't live in also letting them save a lot of money in taxes apparently--Montana is commonly used. I just don't see anything you could do on behalf of the buyer that would make their life easier. It's really not a hard process at all to bring a car across the border from Canada (assuming it's 25+ years old) after making the purchase even though many say you should use a broker. The U.S. customs agents at the border are setup to help with the paperwork needed (and collect the taxes if applicable) and there's no non-shady way for you to help with skirting this extra cost (I think it's ~4% of the Bill of Sale amount). If you were thinking you could take the car across the border for the buyer before the sale was finalized to save them the crossing and costs from that, it won't work. That's because there is the customs form that is generated when the border is crossed. You would not be able to obtain this and the buyer must have this to title and register the car. So the first thing they would have to do after you delivered them the car would be to go to a customs agent somewhere to get that done, which is just easiest to do right when crossing the border back into the U.S. with the car. If the buyer won't be coming to you to pick up the car in person and instead using a shipper, then unfortunately there is no choice except for them to use a broker and incur those extra costs. You as the seller can't be the broker on their behalf if that's sort of what you are thinking.

-Gary
 
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