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Hi all

I'm going to ask an unanswerable question because I'm trying to get some real world feedback, not an answer. I've also put this question to Wes Ingram.

I'm restoring a 73 GTV 2000 which I bought as a project. After cleaning grounds, replacing battery etc I was able to start the motor before rebuilding it (ran okay, started on first few cranks in pretty cold weather after sitting several years). Due to the condition of the rest of the car (no seats etc) i was unable to drive it.

I now have the engine rebuilt with 1750 cams and motronic pistons. I've done the bench checks on the spica - it rotates freely, I don't think it smells of gas but the old oil smell is pretty strong so I can't say conclusively. The car had an indicated 58k miles on it which I'm inclined to believe is accurate because everything was in pretty decent shape.

The Question:

To rebuild the pump or not. On the one hand I suppose it is possible to remove the pump once the engine is in the car. This seems the sensible wait-and-see route. But on the other hand, I'm putting a lot of time and effort into building a car that I can just get into, start right up after a week or so of sitting a drive a few hundred miles with confidence, and the pump is a big part of that. I suppose if I had it rebuilt it would also come fully adjusted, set up, etc?

Opinions?
 

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If the oil smells of gas, odds are good the plungers fit poorly and are passing fuel into the oil. Hard to give a definitive answer, but Wes's Spica book shows pics of a bench test with solvent and an air hose, so you can check pretty readily without special tools.

That said, you can send to Wes for evaluation. He can troubleshoot, fix what's needed without doing a full rebuild, if it doesn't need one.

If it was me, I'd probably clean up, air-test the plungers, install, set up, and see how it works. I had a pump on my GTV last year dump a ton of gas in the oil, basically overnight, and the oil pressure dropped, sump filled up, ran badly, all kinds of bad things. Didn't ruin the engine, but changing pumps with the engine in the car is not a fun job.

Roadtrip may chime in. There are a number of basic checks one can do on a pump if you know what to look for. Vertical compensator link spring inside/forward of the capsule is OK? Solenoids work? Microswitch work? Not cruddy or rusty inside? Tip of cam follower has ball intact?

Andrew
Andrew
 

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These things are pretty robust actually. I neglected mine twice with layups where I did nothinig to protect the FI pump or fuel system (before stabilizers the first time and no intent to leave it so long the 2nd time). After the 1st 7 year layup (77-84), it worked fine. Other stuff didn't, but the FI pump came back fine. (TA replaced). The 2nd time (2000-2007, at about 106k miles), it was not happy. (We gambled and lost on the FI pump, clutch and 2 boosters.) So it needed a rebuild by Wes and new TA. At that point is was ~37 years old anyway and probably needed a good polishing, but the abuse did not help at all. The ideas on troubleshooting look good. Do the checks and if you are not taking a cross country trip, drive it and monitor - unless you stay in the neighborhood and have an extra wad of cash handy. Good luck!

PS: sitting is never god for a car, hydraulics and fuel especially. The firsttime I replaced half of the auxiliaries, the 2nd time, most of them. Keep it running!!!
 

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I'd go ahead and drain the oil from the logic section and swish some thin oil around in there for a while to clean out the junk. Then once installed on the engine, refill with engine oil. Be sure to tag the pump as needing oil so you don't forget.

Run it for a few weeks and see if any gasoline starts showing up in the logic section. If it does, then a rebuild is necessary.

If you want a benchcheck guide, PM me an email address.
 

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If the oil smells of gas, odds are good the plungers fit poorly and are passing fuel into the oil. Hard to give a definitive answer, but Wes's Spica book shows pics of a bench test with solvent and an air hose, so you can check pretty readily without special tools.

That said, you can send to Wes for evaluation. He can troubleshoot, fix what's needed without doing a full rebuild, if it doesn't need one.

If it was me, I'd probably clean up, air-test the plungers, install, set up, and see how it works. I had a pump on my GTV last year dump a ton of gas in the oil, basically overnight, and the oil pressure dropped, sump filled up, ran badly, all kinds of bad things. Didn't ruin the engine, but changing pumps with the engine in the car is not a fun job.

Roadtrip may chime in. There are a number of basic checks one can do on a pump if you know what to look for. Vertical compensator link spring inside/forward of the capsule is OK? Solenoids work? Microswitch work? Not cruddy or rusty inside? Tip of cam follower has ball intact?

Andrew
Andrew
I will be doing a bench test on a Spica pump. What kind of solvent should I use to put inh the plunger chamber...?
 

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Carb cleaner should be fine. Finish with clean gasoline. If the pump has been sitting derelict for a long time, I'd put the injectors in a jar of gasoline for a week or two. You can dismantle the fuel towers on the top of the pump to clean them, but you have to know what you're doing and get the one-way valve parts back in correctly. Same with the injectors.
 

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Carb cleaner should be fine. Finish with clean gasoline. If the pump has been sitting derelict for a long time, I'd put the injectors in a jar of gasoline for a week or two. You can dismantle the fuel towers on the top of the pump to clean them, but you have to know what you're doing and get the one-way valve parts back in correctly. Same with the injectors.

Ok, thanks. Just to make sure-I will be doing test described in WesIngrams book. So the solvent mentioned in his text can be carb cleaner? I think I will not dismantle fuel towers, I am a bit worried that I will overtighten them and another seized plunger will happen. I will put injectors in gasoline, thanks for advice.
 

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