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Discussion Starter #1
I'm new to the Portland area and it took a while to find recommendations for a local powder coater to paint my vintage Campy alloys. As it turned out, three people sent me to the same place, Vancouver Powder Coating, and I'm glad they did.

The owners, Molly and Drew, are quality conscious, customer-oriented, and just plain nice to work with. Hard to beat that combination.

The price to media-blast and coat my wheels was $300, plus the cost of the special order Pacific Silver paint. It would have cost almost half that in materials, not to mention hours of my time, to paint the wheels at home. And I still wouldn't have gotten the durability of powder coating.

In case you're considering redoing your wheels, Vancouver Powder Coating's number is 360-910-7596. They're on E. 18th Street, just south of Fourth Plain and west of Andresen.

The tires, by the way, are Dunlop's super sticky Diarrhea Star Spec Z1's. Okay, I may have changed the name slightly --Diarrhea-Direzza-- but who in the heck would name a tire so it sounds like it has an intestinal ailment?
 

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anyone know of a good powder coater in Long Island , NY..? Need a similar job done.....
 

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I'm new to the Portland area and it took a while to find recommendations for a local powder coater to paint my vintage Campy alloys. As it turned out, three people sent me to the same place, Vancouver Powder Coating, and I'm glad they did.

The owners, Molly and Drew, are quality conscious, customer-oriented, and just plain nice to work with. Hard to beat that combination.

The price to media-blast and coat my wheels was $300, plus the cost of the special order Pacific Silver paint. It would have cost almost half that in materials, not to mention hours of my time, to paint the wheels at home. And I still wouldn't have gotten the durability of powder coating.

In case you're considering redoing your wheels, Vancouver Powder Coating's number is 360-910-7596. They're on E. 18th Street, just south of Fourth Plain and west of Andresen.

The tires, by the way, are Dunlop's super sticky Diarrhea Star Spec Z1's. Okay, I may have changed the name slightly --Diarrhea-Direzza-- but who in the heck would name a tire so it sounds like it has an intestinal ailment?
they came out great.

anyone know of a good powder coater in Long Island , NY..? Need a similar job done.....
i had mine done in northern, NJ. they cost about $175 / rim. much more than in portland.

i also know of a quality place in westchester, ny - about the same price though.

if you find a place in LI, it would probably be about the same price.
 

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No problems with them being made out of magnesium i guess?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Don't know about other types of wheels, but my Campagnolo Daytonas are an aluminum-magnesium alloy and presented no problem for the powder coater.
 

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I have a set of Campagnolo America wheels that had some "gassing" when the powdercoat was baked, causing smal bubles in the finish. So it can happen.......
BTW, I believe that the Daytonas are made by Chromadora...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Both companies made the Daytona-style wheels. The name is hard to read in my photo, but Campagnolo is on the rim.

My wheels were taken off a new Spider purchased at European Auto Imports in Santa Clara, CA in late 1982 or early 1983. I wonder if the purchaser is on AlfaBB? If so, thank you. I purchased the never-used wheels from the dealership in 1983 and have used them ever since.
 

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True, true....
I didn't look closely at your picture to see that you have the late model ones.
These will have no problem powdercoating.
The early Campies seem to have a higher mag content and more chance of gassing when heated.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
True, true....
I didn't look closely at your picture to see that you have the late model ones.
These will have no problem powdercoating.
The early Campies seem to have a higher mag content and more chance of gassing when heated.
Hmm, you'd think the bigger issue would be us old owners gassing when heated.
 

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True, true....
I didn't look closely at your picture to see that you have the late model ones.
These will have no problem powdercoating.
The early Campies seem to have a higher mag content and more chance of gassing when heated.

Hi, Randy. How can you tell which of the Campys are electron and which are aluminum? I have a good set but I don't know how to tell the new ones from the old ones.
 

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Al of the Campy, Chromo wheels are an alloy of Al. mag and other metals. In the '50s and early '60s, most were made for racing and had a high mag content. Very light, but brittle and subject to cracks and corrosion.
The first pic is my American Silverstone wheels made in '65. Very light, but they will oxidise quickly without any coating.
Next is my GTV with Chromodora Daytonas made in '70. Less mag content, will oxidise but it takes a lot longer.
The mags shown in this thread are from a later Spider and have less mag.
Most of the repro wheels made today are almost all Aluminum for easy (cheap) manufacture but are heavier than the old mags.
 

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