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Discussion Starter #1
Hi gang,

I've finished the cleaning phase and am about to do the metal prep. I am wondering if anyone who has used POR-15 has any advice about the fuel return tube welded into the tank of my 81 Spider?

Is is OK to to slosh the sealer around and let it dry with the inner end of the tube open? Or will that clog the tube with sealant.

Or is it OK to swish and drain the sealer and within several minutes run a long pipe cleaner down the tube to ensure it is open it's full length?

Or should I drop a string down it, fish it out the fill hole and tie a taped button on the string and pull it up snug against the inner end of the tube until the sealer is set up?

All comments and experiences welcome!

Carey
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply skytop. I wish I could brush it on.I'm doing the fuel tank from my 81 spider and it's a small hole I get to work through. I just sloshed the cleaner around inside with a few nuts to abrade the lose rust. Peering in with a mirror on a stick I can see quite a bit of rust remaining. Hopefully the metal prep eat this and the sealer will be happy.

One concern I have is the pipe that returns the fuel from the speaker injection reaches nearly to the bottom of the tank. I worry that the sealer, being viscous as it is, might reduce the ID of this pipe or perhaps even clog it. Given your experience with the sealer do you think this is a valid concern?
 

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POR-15 can be sprayed on. Spray judiciously and you will not suffer from unwanted build up.

Also, there is a POR-15 fuel tank repair kit that may be a good choice for your needs.
http://www.amazon.com/POR-15-49229-Motorcycle-Fuel-Repair/dp/B00J5947ME/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1418825754&sr=8-2&keywords=por-15+fuel+tank+repair+kit&pebp=1418825791121

I have used POR-15 for almost 25 years. Back in 1990, I could only obtain it from the Eastwood company. Now it is available at many (discount) suppliers. It is the premier rust conversion application that really works and lasts.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Small opening, big tank including baffling. I'm afraid it's going to be pour and slosh.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It seems both require good prep, which is understandable. I've purchased the POR-15, so I'll go ahead with that solution. (no pun intended, but I liked it.)
 

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The metal prep is not that effective on rust. On serious rust, it would take a great deal of volume and time to properly work, as its a phosphoric acid based product. When I restored my tank, I performed a Muriatic Acid (HCL) wash, then immediately followed it up with the metal prep on what was then bare metal in order to stop the etching.

HCL obliterates rust - fast - but it leaves the metal vulnerable to flash rust due to its etching of the metal surface. Note that you should never breathe the HCL and always wear gloves and proper PPE. Adding (a lot of) baking soda to the HCL will render it inert. It can then be washed out with water and followed with the metal prep. The metal prep makes sure that the steel is pacified after the HCL wash.

I followed these two steps with the POR-15 fuel tank sealer.

Here are some examples. 1st, a video of the tank when it was pulled:


2nd an image inside the tank after HCL (before metal prep). Notice the flash rust that occurred.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks MNVXer, do you think pool type muriatic acid will do the job? I suppose it's a matter of time and volume eh. The worst rust is on the top of the tank, where all the fittings and holes are, making sealing the tank while swishing a bit of a challenge.
 

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Thanks MNVXer, do you think pool type muriatic acid will do the job? I suppose it's a matter of time and volume eh. The worst rust is on the top of the tank, where all the fittings and holes are, making sealing the tank while swishing a bit of a challenge.
Pool type is what I used. Muriatic acid is a % mix of hydrochloric acid, so its designated purpose is irrelevant. I know some people also use it for cleaning concrete.

As always, use PPE - this stuff is not a joke. Yes its diluted, but its still HCL. Lot of fumes come off when dissolving rust. Mask, long sleeves, large rubber gloves.. etc. Goggles/safety glasses.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks, I'll bundle up!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
OK, I'm getting close to doing it. I am wondering about a couple details:

1) How much is "a lot of baking soda"?

2) Most of my rust is on the top of the tank, so I'll have to invert the tank with the acid in it. I think it would work to leave the return line pipe open since it reaches almost to the bottom of the tank. When inverted, the tank would have to be full for anything to come out of it except vapors. Which is a good thing since I need to close off the rest of the holes to invert the tank. What is the volume of gasses like? Are they generated quickly such that a 3/8 in pipe would have trouble venting them? I don't want to build a bomb.

I'm thinking of sloshing the tank in hopes of splashing the top to remove a lot of the rust with the fill pipe open before I invert it. Then maybe the gasses will be generated more slowly. I just have not idea how quickly the reaction will progress.

Perhaps you have some advice on these points too.

Thanks,

Carey
 
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