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Yes it certainly can be done in the car. Biggest task short of dropping drive shaft is the removal of the pinion nut. There is a special tool for this that bolts to the pinion and catches the casting of the differential case....locking the diff so you can break the nut loose. Once you get the nut off its all easy.

Best Regards,
John M
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes it certainly can be done in the car. Biggest task short of dropping drive shaft is the removal of the pinion nut. There is a special tool for this that bolts to the pinion and catches the casting of the differential case....locking the diff so you can break the nut loose. Once you get the nut off its all easy.

Best Regards,
John M
What about setting the parking brake instead of this tool...?
 

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What about setting the parking brake instead of this tool...?
thats what i did, last month. worked fine.

don't forget to drain the diff oil first, or you'll make a nasty mess :eek:
and have new oil ready to refill the diff when you're done.

the two most difficult bits for me :

1. getting the pinion nut off. it is peened on for safety, and trying to undo that peen was a pain.

2. the old seal really liked the diff case. it did not want to leave its nest. when it eventually popped free, grungy diff oil was splattered directly into my face :rolleyes:


did you purchase, borrow, or fabricate a pinion nut socket ? it is not a normal hex nut. you need something like this :
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thats what i did, last month. worked fine.

don't forget to drain the diff oil first, or you'll make a nasty mess :eek:
and have new oil ready to refill the diff when you're done.

the two most difficult bits for me :

1. getting the pinion nut off. it is peened on for safety, and trying to undo that peen was a pain.

2. the old seal really liked the diff case. it did not want to leave its nest. when it eventually popped free, grungy diff oil was splattered directly into my face :rolleyes:


did you purchase, borrow, or fabricate a pinion nut socket ? it is not a normal hex nut. you need something like this :

Dab, Nab it! No I don't have that socket-Crapola! Thanks for the info, that socket now adds to the "it's been one of those weeks" stories, you know the stories, the ones you tell your kids to make them have bad dreams...
 

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The parking brake may not be good enough if you are using a breaker bar. I suggest that you use an impact wrench to remove the pinion nut.
Ed Prytherch
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If anyone out there would be willing to allow me to borrow their socket, I'll pay for shipping and yes, you will get it back ($60 for a socket??).
 

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I have one. Send me a PM. Also, if your pinion bearings are worn (probably), you're not going to be able to tighten the nut back to spec when you're done. Important to note the torque getting it off and try to replicate that when putting everything back together again. There's another thread on this exact subject that I wrote.

http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/showthread.php?t=4344&highlight=pinion+seal
 

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I just did this a few weeks ago on my car, made my own tool, used the parking brake, and an air impact to get the nut off, not a bad job. To get the seal out, drill a few smal holes in the old seal, get a few sheet metal screws, pretty short, screw the screws into the holes, but leave enough sticking out that you can use a pry bar, pliers to pull them out, works like a charm! Take up John on borrowing the tool, I spent three hours making mine, but the job with out that took all of 20 minutes...
 

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With my motor and tranny out of my car, I have been planning on replacing the seal before everything goes back in. I have read the tips and tech using the search function. Removal and tool making is covered, my question is in reassembly. How tight/torque should the nut be put back on. What are the tips and tricks to getting this correct. I understand there can be damage if it's not on at the correct torque.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ring nut securing the flange to the propeller shaft: 57.5 - 101 ft/lbs
What has been said is saying if your stuff is old, to ignore those specs, but to reintall the nut at the torque it took you to remove. Once you're in that neighborhood of torque, the ping mark will guide you the rest of the way...
 

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Removal torque can be affected by rust, corrosion, crud and not fully disengaged nut peen fixation.

Not only that, but would you use a torque wrench and hopefully read it while you are trying to get it to break away. That may be difficult.

Just my thoughts, since it has been stated that it is a "Bi**h getting the pinion nut off. (Impact wrench suggested..).

Good luck and thanks for sharing your frustrations!

What I/We learn from you will pay big time dividends when we end up doing our own.

Best regards, Elio
 

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Yup, I could see where that would work.

Not for me though, as my torque wrench ony indicates tightening torques and I never use it to loosen stuff regardless.
I've heard that same thing too, not to use a torque wrench to loosten stuff, but I also heard placing a car battery on concrete drains it...I've wondered about these car myths...
 

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The nut is marked (peened), so you can always line it back up with this mark and you will know it is close to what it was, the new seal won't effect this. Just make sure it spins free when you are done.
 

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Storing a battery on concrete will drain it.

My mom has lost more than one of hers that way when she moves them off the pallet I put them on for winter storage to make room for whatever.

Oddly enough, (or not), the ones that stay on the pallet barely need a charge come spring....
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Storing a battery on concrete will drain it.

My mom has lost more than one of hers that way when she moves them off the pallet I put them on for winter storage to make room for whatever.

Oddly enough, (or not), the ones that stay on the pallet barely need a charge come spring....
I'm sorry, **** it Tifosi, not you!!! I've got a battery on concrete right now, been in my garage for 2 years on concrete, still it is fine...Where are you papajam...???
 

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:shrug:

Mabe it has to do with the ambient temperature and humidity content along with it.

I know we see a lot of double digit sub zero in the winter here making for a really cold floor, and it is kinda dank where they get stored.

Then again, mabe she's just got crap luck in general. (I mean, c'mon, she had me.......)
 
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