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Thanks. Any shots of your car?
Yes, see here: http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/gt-1963-1977/459194-my-journey-105-ownership.html

Regarding your "squirmy" rear end, get all your suspension checked out. Mine had loads of new suspension parts fitted when I got it and seemed to drive OK but when I got a knowledgable specialist to look at he found a couple of bushes that had not been properly fitted. The main thing though was that the bushes in the t-bar were missing and he said that many "specialists" don't bother refitting those when they wear out because it is a difficult job. You could grab the car and move it from side to side at the rear. I got the suspension completely redone by Alfaholics and it transformed the car. No squirmy rear end feel for me, and I'm on 5.5" "everyday" tyres.
 

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Also keep in mind that you're at the original stock ride height. For '73, the front was raised with spacers under the springs to meet new bumper height regulations. I assume the rear springs may have been a tad taller as well to even out the overall stance. The higher CG alone will make the car feel squirmier than a car that's been lowered.
 

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Thanks all for the comments.

I had a tough time getting the slave cylinder out as Austin Juneau implied. When I noticed the mount was actually the bell housing casting I kind of felt a chill up my spine. Spraying some penetrating oil and a little mapp gas heat made it easy to get it out. I couldn't believe all the gymnastics with the grip rings though. I may look into having the original one sleeved back to the original bore size if it still leaks.


Feudal serf: Thanks for the tips on the drain holes. Another drain hole finding: so far I have lost two small tools down one of the drain holes up by the cowl/fender joint. I can see the removable panel in the fender well will give me access so I can retrieve them. I wonder what else I'll find in there?
I just removed the fender well panels in my 72. Found an old wrench, a random bolt, plastic cap of some sort, and enough soil to start a small garden...

Good on you for getting the slave cylinder out; I tried mine with the engine/trans still installed, but no luck. Easy job once I pulled both.
 

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Yes, see here: http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/gt-1963-1977/459194-my-journey-105-ownership.html

Regarding your "squirmy" rear end, The main thing though was that the bushes in the t-bar were missing and he said that many "specialists" don't bother refitting those when they wear out because it is a difficult job.
I had the same issue with my car, the bushes on the Tbar were totally gone and is was "loose" back there. I bought new poly bushes from ClassicAlfa for about $8. To install them without removing the whole rear end I took the advice of another alfabb poster and simply cut a slice in them on one side with heavy shears. Then I lubed them good with lithium grease and fitted them around the shaft by hand and nudged them into place, 5 minute job. No more squirming.
 

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I just removed the fender well panels in my 72. Found an old wrench, a random bolt, plastic cap of some sort, and enough soil to start a small garden...

Good on you for getting the slave cylinder out; I tried mine with the engine/trans still installed, but no luck. Easy job once I pulled both.
What are these fender well panels you guys are discussing? Is there supposed to be a covering inside the front well that protects the turn signal wiring and such from the elements? My car has no coverings and I assumed it was just like that, being my 1st Alfa. But it would make sense for there to be a covering, I always thought that was odd to have all that exposed to the tire area.
 

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There are both front and rear inner panels for the front fender wells...

If the plastic cap is shallow, with a small hole in the center and found on the passenger side, it could be part of the retaining clip for the "Bertone" badge...

Dirt accumulation at the base of the rocker, behind the inner rear panel is common... along with the rust that starts from the inside...
 

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Thanks all for the comments.

I had a tough time getting the slave cylinder out as Austin Juneau implied. When I noticed the mount was actually the bell housing casting I kind of felt a chill up my spine. Spraying some penetrating oil and a little mapp gas heat made it easy to get it out. I couldn't believe all the gymnastics with the grip rings though. I may look into having the original one sleeved back to the original bore size if it still leaks.

Bellagt: On the drive home I noticed the mirror was just an ornament. As soon as I adjusted it, the wind just flopped it down. When I got home the first job I did was pull that mirror off and tighten the screws securing the pivot. I took the time to clean up the mirror too.

Feudal serf: Thanks for the tips on the drain holes. Another drain hole finding: so far I have lost two small tools down one of the drain holes up by the cowl/fender joint. I can see the removable panel in the fender well will give me access so I can retrieve them. I wonder what else I'll find in there?
Agree wth Austin, save yourself time and effort, replace the slave, for under fifty bucks. I recently attempted a clutch master cylinder rebuild, big waste of time!
 

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Look here for the splash panels, there are specific ones for the front and back, side to side:

ST030 GT splash panel front left - Classic Alfa

The panels are rubber edged to try and follow (poorly) the fender form. The rubber edging is held on with large staples.
 

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Pretty sure this is the same car that quietly came up for sale by the original owner just after I bought my GTV in 2001. It's pretty special...for those who haven't seen this old write-up:

Time Machine: The World's Best Original Afa Romeo GTV?
Could very well be. I recall reading that the original owner treated the cotton threading in the seat upholstery with bees wax to keep them from rotting.

If it is the same car, then great find and buy. But do you keep it original, low miles, or get it ready for the road and enjoy the car as it was meant to be driven? Personally, I think it's time to put some real miles on the car.
 

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Discussion Starter #33 (Edited)
Pretty sure this is the same car that quietly came up for sale by the original owner just after I bought my GTV in 2001. It's pretty special...for those who haven't seen this old write-up:

Time Machine: The World's Best Original Afa Romeo GTV?
Yes Paulsle, that is the same car. Last week I was able to connect with the original owner (he's in his late 80s today) and he and his son have been very helpful describing his ownership experience. He has some photos from when he owned it and I am really looking forward to seeing them.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Could very well be. I recall reading that the original owner treated the cotton threading in the seat upholstery with bees wax to keep them from rotting.

If it is the same car, then great find and buy. But do you keep it original, low miles, or get it ready for the road and enjoy the car as it was meant to be driven? Personally, I think it's time to put some real miles on the car.
I am with you; this is why I am doing the major service to it. No garage queens here please. The second owner put 10k miles on it over his 13 year ownership. I would much rather have a car that has been driven than one that is ultra low miles but one ride away from needing a full mechanical restoration :)
 

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I am with you; this is why I am doing the major service to it. No garage queens here please. The second owner put 10k miles on it over his 13 year ownership. I would much rather have a car that has been driven than one that is ultra low miles but one ride away from needing a full mechanical restoration :)
Well said! Just protect it and try to avoid using it in nasty weather. But get her out to be seen and enjoyed.

Do you plan on lowering her? I don't think that would affect he originality but as others have pointed out may help improve the driving experience.

Fascinating backstory btw. I thought I had attention to detail but applying beeswax to seat stitching is verging on obsessive!
 

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Tools falling into the cowl hole

Thanks all for the comments.

Another drain hole finding: so far I have lost two small tools down one of the drain holes up by the cowl/fender joint. I can see the removable panel in the fender well will give me access so I can retrieve them. I wonder what else I'll find in there?
I found a very nice 10mm wrench in my GTV
 
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