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Discussion Starter #1
Just finished my private pilots checkride today, passed with flying colors! How many 17 year old Alfa Owners can say that... HA! Maybe next Ill get a Macchi or something.

Just out of curiosity, how many of you all on here have your pilots license? I have seen many and I guess the two sort of go hand in hand, Alfas and Airplanes that is.
 

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Admitting that you play with Alfas AND airplanes at the age of 17 pretty much hints at trust funds and privilege. Don't worry. Keep playing with those two things will return you to the working class soon enough.

Welcome to the party.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Nah no trust funds here :smile2: I bought my Milano when I was 14 with money I had made working in the local boat yard( it was quite the steal for 500 bucks, I guess the guy just wanted to get out of Alfas link: http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/alfa-romeo-cars-sale-wanted/200123-1989-milano-gold.html ). As for the flying, there is this great youth volunteer program at the local Aero museum, give time, learn to fly, just as an added bonus though.... All in all I guess I am just A very lucky kid.
 

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I was in Port Townsend several years ago, making a sales call at a local paper mill. Flew my old Mooney into your local airport. Pretty area.
 

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Congratulations on passing your checkride! Just remember it's a license to learn. Never exceed your aircraft's or your own limitations.

Luck? I only believe in luck as 10% of the equation. Hard work, motivation, and perserverance are what sets the winners apart from the rest. Not many young men have the drive, smarts, and skill to do what you've done already at 17 years old.

I've been flying military and commercial for 35 years. Still fun and challenging. I'll be retiring in about three years. Glad to see good guys coming up to pass the stick to.
 

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HA! Maybe next Ill get a Macchi or something.
Congratulations. I got my license at 17 too but I was driving a Fiat back then. (There were no $500 Alfas then) No doubt Macchi''s are cool but if you know how to fix your Milano perhaps you could build one of these, Ing. Nando Groppo srl.
I drive an Airbus now but I've done some varied flying including Acro but nothing was as fun as bush flying and you're in great location for that.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
No doubt Macchi''s are cool but if you know how to fix your Milano perhaps you could build one of these, Ing. Nando Groppo srl.
I drive an Airbus now but I've done some varied flying including Acro but nothing was as fun as bush flying and you're in great location for that.
Yea those Groppos look really cool... Who do you fly the Airbus for? My CFI also instructs on 747s and he always has some really funny storys of what happens around the airline office he works for. Yea the scenery up here is amazing and it makes the museums J3 Cub one of the most fun to fly.
 

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Tangentially related......

I am reminded of an event when a Saia Marchetti SF260 was making a display flight before the Queen of England as part of a competition to earn a contract for RAF training aircraft. The Magnetti Marelli landing gear retract motor failed, and the plane had to land sans gear.
 

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Also tangentially related . . . and being a Naval aircraft maintainer, I'm sure Steve can appreciate this . . .

Back in 1986 I was going through ground school systems training on the new USAF B-1B Bomber. Topic was the wing sweep mechanism taught by a Rockwell Engineer. A Captain in the back of the classroom raised his hand and asked what happens when the wings get stuck back. The engineer bluntly said "That can't happen," after which the entire class broke into laughter. The engineer was completely miffed at the laughter and after asking what was so funny, he was told . . . "This is aviation. It can ALWAYS happen." And sure enough, a couple years later, it did.

It can ALWAYS happen. Thus ends the lesson.
 

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After 9 in flight engine failures in single engine aircraft, I stopped wondering "if"..... Learned to de-hinge one eyeball from the other so I could always have an eye on a potential landing site.
 

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After 9 in flight engine failures in single engine aircraft, I stopped wondering "if"..... Learned to de-hinge one eyeball from the other so I could always have an eye on a potential landing site.
9?! I was thinking, do you do your own maintenance, lol
But I saw the age of some of the aircraft you fly and I understood.
I've only had one, a 150 at 300', found a road, dipped under some power lines and landed straight ahead like they teach.
 

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I had one in a biplane like my avatar at about 200'. U-turned it back to the grass parallel. That airplane could make a turn inside its own wingspan, and I had lost just one cylinder at that point. Had to dodge a big rolled up hay bale on roll-out.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Man, from what you guys say its not a matter of IF it will happen, but WHEN. I guess if I just keep my head when the time comes, all will turn out well. 0:)
 

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I recommend you find something other to do for a living than flying. It rarely works to have your job and pleasure be the same thing over a lifetime. For a while, yeah, but eventually furloughs, regulations, unions, schedules away from home all conspire against you. Plus, the two most dangerous things to a biplane are a step ladder and an airline captain.

Another consideration worth remembering...

Generally, ladies don't like airplanes. They like boats. So, get an airplane that floats.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Actually, I think i will try for my commercial, however, It would only be a just in case sort of thing. It would be just an extra option for work IF I need it. In general though, I agree with Don, in that, I dont want to fly for a living because I do love it so much and dont want to get tired of it on accident. Im actually tthinking of getting a degree in Aerospace engineering then going and getting in Chryslers work study program in their "Italian" Department. :D
 

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I flew in the Navy (A-4s) and then flew a lot of little aircraft after -- including a C-180 on floats. I concur with the earlier statement -- float-planes provide about as much fun as one can have with one's clothes on.

But then last month I had an opportunity to ride in the backseat of a freshly reconstructed TA-4J. I flew on its second, third and fourth flights since its resurrection. The test pilot was a terrific stick, a guy who flew in the last operational Navy A-4 group (out of Puerto Rico). He has some 3,500 hours of A4 time, and he still flies them for a Florida company called Draken.

We wrung the airplane out, then he turned the controls over to me. My last flight had been August 7, 1969 -- so the term rusty is too tame. I was all over the sky trying to make steep turns. But by the third flight, some of it was coming back. I made two loops, and one of them was okay -- not airshow-okay, just fair. The other was ... well, let's just say it wasn't any more exciting than it should have been, but certainly would have looked odd from the ground.

What I am most proud of is that at 72, I could still handle Gs. We pulled five sustained Gs at one point, and even without a G-suit, I was able to stay in the game -- a little tunnel-vision toward the end, but still all there. Yeeha. Felt wonderful about that!

I'll attach three photos. One is a selfie with the Tetons in the background. The second is me in front of the aircraft (which will go the a paint shop after all the test hours are flown. The bottom photo is a touch-and-go. To say this still is a wonderful and vivid memory is to shortchange it. Awesome also is a word that is too tame.

I didn't get my first lesson until I was 22, but I'd love to have started earlier. Good for you Alfatothemax. Keep it up. An aerospace engineer with a commercial license would be any company's dream employee.
 

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