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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,
Getting ready to join my s4 engine with tranny (new clutch) and I obtained a new crank pilot bushing from Centerline. The bushing does not slide onto the shaft nor does it for into the crankshaft easily. Centerline states "boil for one hour". Does this remedy the problem or does the inner diameter of the bushing need to be honed. The s4 engine crank does not currently have a bushing installed. The bushing I received from Centerline is for "late" models. Thanks for any advice.
 

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What was wrong with the existing bush? Never heard of one wearing out
Pete
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Forgot to mention that I am swapping an s3 engine for an s4. The bushing on the s3 engine appears ok and have not tried to remove it. The s4 crank does not have a bushing installed. Do you think it would be ok to remove the bushing from the s3 crank and put it on the s4. I've never done one before. Thanks.
 

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Oh. Fair call.

If you can get it out without damage, yes.
Pete
 

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the "grease and dowel method" of removal ought not to cause damage, if you use wood.
fill the bush with thick grease (bit less than full), then get a wooden dowel that fits the pilot bush hole sort of snug, then hammer in the dowel (every now and again you might need to refill some grease as it moves out)
It should pop right out.

not an alfa, but you get the idea
pilot bush removal.jpg

The boil thing is just to let oil permeate into the bush (oilite)
The early manual says boil in hot oil at 248F for 4 hours then let cool down.
Perhaps the new bronze bushes are pre oiled, so 1 hour is enough.??

Either way, the pilot bush should be an easy smooth fit to the gearbox shaft. So test the old bush (if you remove it) on the shaft as well....don't presume
Might as well champfer the edge too, for ease of fitment in the future.

The last thing you want, is to find the bush is too tight, whilst you are lying on your back under the car with 70 lbs of gearbox on your chest and wondering why you can't mate them up;)
 

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An even better method than the grease method for removing the bushing: bread. No seriously, regular white bread from the grocery store (no crust). When compressed, it has a putty like texture. It's more viscous than grease (meaning the dowel fit does not need to be as exact), and less potential for mess.


I recently replaced my pilot bushing with this method as part of my engine rebuild - piece of cake. I actually used a nut driver with an 11mm socket on it instead of a wooden dowel (normal sockets won't work as they have a hole, but the nut driver sockets are solid). For the install, I just soaked the bushing in oil and lubed the crank. It should tap in fairly easily if you do this.
 

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An even better method than the grease method for removing the bushing: bread. No seriously, regular white bread from the grocery store (no crust). When compressed, it has a putty like texture. It's more viscous than grease (meaning the dowel fit does not need to be as exact), and less potential for mess.
You beat me to it!! Bread is better by far! The mess made by the grease blowback when it pops out can be epic.

Honing is fine with a brake cylinder hone.
 

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these bushes wear out of spec and need to be replaced when they do. And an inexpensive pilot bushing puller is a nice addition to the alfa mechanic's armamentarium.
 
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