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Discussion Starter #1
Well, while I wait (and wait, and wait) for the return of my front A-arms with new bushing from the shop, I've moved on to the rear axle.

I have a rear suspension rebuild kit, and (since my car is a 71 with short studs) I have to replace the studs as well.

I have removed the rubber spring stops and the straps, and the calipers but:

How do I remove the rear discs and hubs to access the emergency brake pads and then the studs?

I'm sitting staring at this:

rear hub.jpg

and I'm unclear on how to proceed. I have the car-disc and I've searched the bulletin board, but apparently this step is so simple and obvious it needs no explanation except, well for morons, and me:D

Can anyone patiently explain for me please?

thanks, Lokki
 

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1966-2013
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The brake is released, right?
(hey, gotta ask)

Likely you're currently having an issue with the parking brake shoes hanging up on a small lip on the edge of the drum that appears over time.
You'll need to get at the starwheel brake shoe adjuster via the access hole on the back side of the brake plate and back down the shoe adjustment until there's clearance to remove the rotor/drum. (it'll be shown in the parking brake adjustment section of your manual)

It's plausible that you won't be able to contract the shoes enough to allow the drum to slide over them depending on the size of the ridge.
If so, then release them as far as you can, then tap the rotor off the shoes using a soft faced mallet.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Tifosi - the brake is off and the disc spins smoothly. Here's what I mean about being a moron.... what you're saying is that I just whack the disc from behind with a hammer and the disc should slide out off the studs?

Unless the parking brake shoes hang it up, it's that simple?

(Slaps forehead) I really have to learn to start thinking of whacking stuff with a hammer as a 'normal' act and not a desperation move. ;) Next you'll tell me I really should be drinking more beer while I work on the car :D
 

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Beer during heavy mechanics does NOT make the work any easier. It just makes you care less when you see that bright red stuff dripping thru your grease covered knuckles...

Robert
 

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1966-2013
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the brake is off and the disc spins smoothly.... whack the disc from behind with a hammer and the disc should slide out off the studs?

Unless the parking brake shoes hang it up, it's that simple?
Yup.
You've got the 2 screws out of the face and the shoes aren't engaged so the only thing that's keeping the dic/drum there is the lip and/or some corrosion around the stud holes.

Oh, a correction to my previous:
The starwheel adjusters are accessed via the large holes in the face of the drum, not the backing plate.
(I was thinking of a different make at that moment in time)

And as Robert suggests, beer won't help.
Alcohol is an anti~coagulant you see, so not only do you bleed, you bleed a LOT ;)
 

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Trained (ex)Professional, , 1953-2018 RIP
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...just whack the disc from behind with a hammer and the disc should slide out off the studs?
No, no. Hit the FRONT of the rotor between the wheel studs. NEVER hit the friction surface of the rotor.
 

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A little liquid wrench or WD-40 at the base of the studs and around the inner edge of the disc where it meets the hub will help too.

Robert
 

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A long time ago, I bought a "Body Repair kit" from harbor freight, and it included a slide hammer (used to pull dents outward). I connect this to one of the wheel studs with a simple bracket, give a couple of outward hits with the slider weight, and things come apart relatively easy. This isn't meant to be a tease, I promise to take pictures next time I work on the rear axle...

No, no. Hit the FRONT of the rotor between the wheel studs. NEVER hit the friction surface of the rotor.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Actually came off very easily after I knew what to do. Used a block of wood and light hammer taps while spinning the rotor. I've now removed the axle as I have to change out the studs. It's just not my first instinct to wham something with a hammer, but I'm learning.

So far,looks like the rear suspension rebuild is going to be a little simpler than the front.... until I get to those trunion bushings. I'm sure I'll be back with another 'duh' moment or two for that.

Thanks again.


Lokki
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Removed the caliper placed the block of wood on the back (inside) of the rotor and tapped the wood block with a medium hammer. Rotated the disc slightly and did it again.
Never hit it too hard (keeping in mind the warning not to damage the rotor face) not wanting to **** the rotor at an angle on the studs. Tap, tap, tap, tap and of she came.
 

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They are. But if you undo the four bolts at the back of the splash shield, you can pull the whole axle. Robert
VeloceOne said:
Robert, I am quite aware of that, but the original question was not about pulling the axle, only the rotor. Regards Ian
Well actually Ian, the original question was how to replace the studs. So I tend to side with Robert - both the disk AND the backing plate & axle need to come out.

We all have our tricks for disassembling these things - I tend to remove the whole disk-axle-backing plate with e-brake assembly as a unit. When the disk is stuck to the axle, I use my trusty Harbor Freight press to pop out the four studs. Once you've done that, the disk will usually separate from the ridge on the outside of the axle. If not, I threaten it some more with the press.
 

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Trained (ex)Professional, , 1953-2018 RIP
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...placed the block of wood on the back (inside) of the rotor and tapped the wood block...
Now here I go and share a trade tip that will remove brake drums/rotors instantly without the use of pullers, heat, chemicals or voodoo and with zero risk of damaging the component and it gets ignored.
What's an instructor to do?:rolleyes:
Fingers crossed that the brake pedal doesn't pulse as the result of a bent rotor.
 
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