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Hey Nader, have you decided where are you going to install the accusump reservoir?
 

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Discussion Starter #83 (Edited)
Doc, the Accusump is going in the engine bay wherever I can find room. The electric valve doesn't allow enough flow to locate it away from the engine.

Today I wrestled with the hard fuel line. I bought a 25' roll of 5/16" copper lined steel brake tubing from an auto parts supply house. I used a cheap (Harbor Freight) tubing bender to get it tucked in against the frame rails, and fastened it into place with a combination of the original style foam blocks and rubber-insulated (Adel) clamps.

It's one solid piece without breaks, except for the rubber hose interface to the fuel cell and carbs. I'm glad not to have a return line, because this single one was a real pain. Here's a blurry pic of it on my carpet just before final installation. Can't see some of the bends because of the angle of the shot, but I'm proud of the outcome of this first effort.

Electrics are up next!
 

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Discussion Starter #84 (Edited)
Before attacking the electrical system, I had some unfinished business with the dashboard that was fabricated a couple years ago. The stock dash couldn't be fit around the roll cage without butchering it, and it's too nice to cut, so a new dash was made.

I cut holes for the bare essentials. The fabbed dash obscures the original ignition switch, so I installed the ubiquitous racer hooded ign. switch and push-to-start button. I like the stock tachometer, however inaccurate it is, and will be using it front and center.

I won't be needing a fuel gauge, and will be placing an engine hour meter in its place. I'll leave the fuel gauge in place for now to fill in the gaping hole.

The box off to the right is the fuse panel for modern blade fuses. It has a nice cover which isn't shown here.

Oh, I've also installed a steering wheel quick release for a small OMP wheel. If worse comes to worse, I should be able to eject myself in a hurry. That's something I like about open race cars.

I'll detail some of the electricals in short order (no pun inteneded :)).
 

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Discussion Starter #85 (Edited)
One of the benefits of building a car from scratch is that a hand is laid upon every nut and bolt, and every wire-connector gets a fresh crimp.

Over that last couple months, I've been collecting bits for the electrical system. A nearby boating supply store went out of business, and I bought a bunch of marine grade Ancor wire at liquidation prices (to match my marine grade paint). Good thing, because this wire is about 4x more expensive than automotive wire. The benefits are slim, perhaps more dense stranding, better casing, whatever. I just wanted high quality wire and connectors, well-crimped and soldered, and cleanly routed so as to hopefully never have to mess with electrical issues in the future.

With Papajam's excellent wiring diagram as a guide, I bought all the colors and gauges I thought I'd need, along with connectors, Adel clamps, heat shrink, etc. This being a race car, I'm only wiring the basics, so I didn't need every single wire, switch, or bulb. For battery and alternator cables, I'm using heavy gauge welding wire. It's made of finer stranding and has neoprene casing, so it's more flexible to get around bends and corners. I'm going big on these cables since the battery will be a small Odyssey cell back in the trunk, and didn't want any extra resistance for it especially in cranking a highly compressed race engine.

I laid out most of the wiring booty to take stock and get organized before the fun begins, and the dog felt like he had to guard this electrical treasure. Good boy!:
 

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Discussion Starter #86 (Edited)
I wanted to ensure my electrical connections were secure, so I went out and got the burliest crimper you can get. This is beyond a compound action ratcheting crimper; this is hydraulic. It's 16,000 lbs of pressure in your bare hands! Like a .357 Magnum of crimpers.

Honestly, I bought it to do the big terminals on the battery and alternator cables, but found it to be excellent on smaller gauges as well. It'll do everything from 00 to 12 gauge. Fuzzy pic, but here's a comparison shot of a regular crimper's indentation versus the magnum's pinch crimp:
 

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Discussion Starter #89
The stock fuse panel is blocked by the roll cage, so I opted to put this Bussmann blade-type fuse panel on the dash within easy reach. If I want to crank the engine without firing it, I can easily pull the coil and/or fuel pump fuses from the driver's seat.

Still have a few more wires to route, and the back of the fuse box will get a little busier as more wires are routed in. Here's what I have for the dash so far, behind the scenes:
 

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Discussion Starter #90
I thought the ratcheting ones we have at work were pretty cool, until I saw that. Where did you even find that?
Like half my tools these days, I got this hydraulic crimper at the ole Harbor Freight. $69. Then get 20% off from a coupon in the back of automotive or motorcycle magazines. It's crazy, cause I've seen similar brand-name ones for over $1500.

All right. Just have to mount and wire the battery, kill switch, coil, and fuel pump, and I'll be ready to fire up this boiler! Still a handful of other relatively minor odds and ends, but I'm seeing the light at the end of this tunnel.
 

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Discussion Starter #91 (Edited)
Pretty much done with electricals. That was kind of fun! Everything is strongly crimped, soldered, wrapped in heat-shrink, then dabbed with dielectric grease outside the contacts.

For a battery, I went with the Odyssey PC680. I had some steel 1/8" thick strapping left over from my fuel cell bracketry, and used it to secure the battery against the trunk wall behind the right rear wheel. I crafted the battery tray out of a defunct Harbor Freight air hose reel bracket. Between the battery and the tray is a 1/4" thick rubber mat which is from a large roll I bought from the Boeing factory surplus store before they closed their doors a couple years ago.

These little projects go well with a glass of cheap cab, so long as you keep the metal shavings out of it!
 

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Discussion Starter #92
Remember how I had the fuel gauge in place as a vestigial instrument to fill the hole? I was going to put an engine hour meter in its place, but why have that constant and ruthless reminder of an impending engine rebuild staring at me, mocking me, when I'm just glancing at the gauges while barreling down the straight? So I opted to fit in a volt meter instead.

While I was at it, I thought a cigarette lighter would be a nice finishing touch. You know, for those after-race smokes. Actually, I wanted a 12V accessory socket for when I plug in my A/F meter or whatever.
 

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Discussion Starter #94
So it's pretty much buttoned up, electrically. Just a couple more odds and ends and I'm going to fire up the beast!

I've skipped over detailing pics of the kill switch, nothing too interesting there. Mine is a heavy duty, weatherproof unit from Longacre that weighs about 5 lbs. So I mounted it atop the dash on the right side to distribute weight. In fact, most of my unnecessarily heavy gauged wiring is routed along the right side of the car.

Here's a couple pics of the car's first signs of life. Hooray!
 

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Discussion Starter #95
The car can run as is. But I'm holding off the inaugural starting until the oil system is more complete. I have a remote oil line adapter at the engine block (nicely crafted by another board member), and correspondingly have a remote mount oil filter bracket. The remote filter will allow me to run a decent and commonly available modern oil filter, change it quickly and cleanly (thereby more often), and also allows the option of additional outputs for an oil cooler (pending), Accusump (pending), oil temp gauge, or whatever.

The location in the engine bay where I want the remote filter would require drilling through two layers of sheet metal to fit the bolts. So I'm going to take the hard way and weld a bracket with studs onto the engine bay wall, and bolt the remote filter bracket to that.

Here's a pic of the bracket build. Boring stuff, but I've been contemplating how to mount this thing for the last 4 months, and feel like I have to share now that I'm actually making progress:
 

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Hey, steel shavings help cheap cab, gives it a certain gravitas, a certain jun-sais-croque,(crock?). Aluminum shavings give you a twinkly smile. Only upsides!

The project looks great.
 

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Discussion Starter #97
I've been having great luck at Carquest for my project needs. The remote filter bracket is made for a Ford, so I asked my experienced parts guy for the biggest Ford oil filter that would fit my bracket's diameter. He came up with this filter (made to OEM specs by Wix) which looks to be almost a quart in capacity. It has the nice orange high temp silicone anti-backflow valve that other makes may lack, and will guarantee forward flow of oil dumped in from the Accusump. I liked it so much, I bought two.
 

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Discussion Starter #98
Here's the bracket welded onto the engine bay wall, across from the alternator. Once painted, it will disappear into the background and look like a factory fitting:
 

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Discussion Starter #99
And here it is mostly installed. Man, I've been mulling over this project for weeks. Glad it's done. I'll bolt it up and attach the hoses later when the paint is fully dry. Once the car is up and running, I'll turn my attention to installing the Accusump and oil cooler. But this is enough of an oil system hop-up for now.
 

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Hi,
Notice your brake booster are gone. I like this mucho. I am working on a 69 GTV and want to get rid of this set up. Tell me how you did it.

J
 
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